Trouble building Ritchey Break Away

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by 886014, Dec 17, 2009.

  1. 886014

    886014 New Member

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    G'day Guys, I have a steel Ritchey Break Away I bought up in the States ages ago but never got around to building it would you believe. So tonight I sat down to finish the job and pretty much got it completed except for one major snag.

    Regardless of what I do I can't get the rear derailleur out far enough to be able to select the highest (11) gear. Even with the High screw backed right out it just doesn't move out far enough. I'm using a Shimano Dura-ace 7800 derailleur with a compact on the front. The groupset came off another bike which was functioning perfectly so I doubt there is anything wrong with the derailleur. The other thing I've noticed is that when I fit a wheel the skewer nut needs to be tightened considerably before I can do the quick release up. Not sure if that's related?I haven't been able to check the rear hanger alignment but it doesn't appear to be at any bizarre angle or anything.

    While I'm not a professional mechanic by any means, I've built plenty of bikes previously but have to admit this one has me a bit stumped. Wondering if anyone has any clues?

    Pete
     
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  2. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    Put a 1mm axle spacer under the bolt that affixes the rear derailleur to the frame. Return spring on the RD is getting tired. Coupled with steel dropouts and der hanger which are thinner, keeping the RD closer to the center of the bicycle.

    If that doesn't work you 'may' need a mew derailleur.
     
  3. Reezcycle

    Reezcycle New Member

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    Hi Pete! Sorry I'm no bike wizard, but you might try & get some good tips here ==> How to Adjust Rear Derailleurs on a Bicycle | eHow.com

    Good luck!:D
     
  4. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Before you add spacers, double check the way you've attached the cable to the rear derailleur. It sounds crazy, but with the DA derailleur you've got to make sure you just pinch the cable under the cable clamp and don't try to thread or wrap the cable. It doesn't sound like it would make a difference but I upgraded a couple of bikes to DA a few seasons ago and that mistake in cable clamping prevented either of them from shifting to the far outboard cog. Reattaching the cable properly fixed the problem in both cases.

    It's pretty easy to check, if your derailleur moves far enough with no cable attached but doesn't move through the proper range with the cable attached and you have slack in the cable then it's a problem with cable attachment. If you look closely you can see where an improperly attached cable clamp interferes with the parallelogram of the derailleur body and limits its motion. I'm working from memory and don't have a bike to look at but IIRC it has something to do with the small square cable clamping plate and my mistake of rotating it which seemed more secure but which moves the little right angle tang such that it interferes with proper motion.

    Good luck,
    -Dave
     
  5. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I do believe that'd be it. I've had that one happen before...

    http://techdocs.shimano.com/media/t...I_5V50E/SI_5V50E_En_v1_m56577569830612494.pdf

    In the section "Stroke adjustment and cable securing" item 2. The bottom diagram shows how the cable fixing bolt and plate should be orientated. The plate 'tab' can interfere with the parrallelogram.

    I think Shimano worked with bike shops on ways to confuse the average Joe and those who don't RTFM.
     
  6. 886014

    886014 New Member

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    OK, that particular derailleur hasn't done a huge amount of work from memory, but I can see the logic in what you're saying. I tried to reuse a chain on this build, always a recipe for disaster with Shimano's lovely joining pins, so it finished up getting a master link ( ... by design, of course :rolleyes:) The upshot now is that I can easily break the chain and have a triple Ultegra derailleur sitting here I can slip in pretty easily so will give that a go.

    Incidentally, for those who suggested the cable, the H adjustment can be done with the cable not attached so it's nothing to do with the cable but thanks anyway. I once had an equally perplexing shifting problem that was caused by the cable being on the wrong side of the bolt, woops. I believe the other side allows you to use the derailleur with old clusters with wider spacing but of course "steps" the wrong amount with 10 speed.

    Pete
     
  7. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Have you looked closely at the diagram Swampy posted and your derailleur. The question is whether the tab has been rotated 90 degrees and is interfering with the parallelogram. My error for saying you could test by disconnecting the cable, the real test is whether the tab on the cable fixing washer has been rotated out of position as shown in the Shimano diagram.

    -Dave

    P.S. Here's the relevant part of the Shimano PDF. With the fixing washer rotated as shown in the 'do not do' image the symptoms will be just as you describe because the tab hits the parallelogram in the small cog position with or without a cable attached.
     
  8. 886014

    886014 New Member

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    Coffee time so thought I'd post that it looks as if it's solved. I tried another derailleur and it worked fine, yet the one I took off was fine on another bike and the spring was clearly strong. I had a real good look at the DA derailleur while it was off and it seemed to be working ok, so I put it back on and it adjusted up quite ok. Go figure!

    The only thing I can think of is that there was something wedged either in the mechanism or under the H screw that was preventing it moving right out. I hate these jobs where you can't be certain of a conclusion but if it's ok now there's nothing to be done about it.

    Anyway, just to put a saddle on it, cut the steerer and I reckon I'll call it built. Will be interesting to see how it rides ... tomorrow. Today it's raining ;)

    Thanks for the suggestions.

    Pete
     
  9. skg_ent

    skg_ent New Member

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    Pete,

    I've had a steel Break-Away and now own a ti-carbon road frame. It's an awesome riding frame. The steel BAB was the best riding steel bike I've ever owned. If you have any questions about the Break-Away frame itself, let me know and I'm happy to chat more about it. I never ran DA on it, however, only Ultegra derailleurs. There's also a Facebook page for the Ritchey Break-Away with a bunch of fans and owners on it too. :D That may also be a helpful place to get real-world info from actual owners. Have fun with your BAB!

    -Stacy
     
  10. 886014

    886014 New Member

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    Thanks Stacy, I'll look into that. I haven't ridden a steel frame for many years so it should be interesting. Yesterday I had the LBS cut the steerer as it's not worth me owning a jig to do it. As I was taking the completed bike back to my car a guy on the street literally bailed me up and was very enthusiastic about what a great looking bike it was. He couldn't believe it when I showed him that it was actually a "folding" bike and how it broke apart. For a bike that was mainly built from surplus parts I had and an old set of Ksyrium ES rims it does look pretty sweet I'd have to admit. I haven't weighed it yet, but it's quite light too.

    Pete
     
  11. skg_ent

    skg_ent New Member

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    Hey Pete!
    Like you I've had several people comment on how great my BAB looks, and they can't believe it breaks apart. For me, the break apart feature not only looks invisible but rides as though it's not even there. I found the steel bike to be a lively and very comfortable ride. I actually sold my carbon race bike and bought the steel Break-Away because I live in a place where the roads are terrible and the carbon was too rough of a ride; the carbon felt like my fillings were rattling out. The steel BA was such a welcome change and sacrificed nothing in performance. My steel BA was 17 lbs, only .5 lb heavier than my carbon bike , and kept up with no problems with my pals with carbon bikes. I even beat them in hill climbs sometimes. One of the things I like best about it is being able to stow the bike broken apart in the back of my car. It's nice not to have to run a car rack, where my bike gets all crudded up with road grime. Have fun with your bike and let me know if I can answer any questions about it.
    -Stacy
     
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