Trouble Commuting.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by D Hall, May 19, 2003.

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  1. D Hall

    D Hall Guest

    After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    (haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.

    Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    into work.

    cheers in advance for any advice.

    Darren.
     
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  2. In message <[email protected]>, D Hall
    <[email protected]> writes
    >After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    >afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    >(haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    >quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    >breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    >so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.
    >
    >Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    >idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    >into work.
    >
    >cheers in advance for any advice.
    >
    >Darren.

    It sounds as if you've identified the problems - lack of fitness and inadequate food. The fitness
    will come back with time, my recommendation for a high calorie, easily digestible breakfast is
    sweetened porridge, failing that cake. (I actually prefer cake for breakfast but it somehow doesn't
    see right.)
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  3. In message <[email protected]>, D Hall
    <[email protected]> writes
    >After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    >afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    >(haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    >quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    >breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    >so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.
    >
    >Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    >idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    >into work.
    >
    >cheers in advance for any advice.
    >
    >Darren.

    You seem to have identified the causes of the problem, inadequate fitness and inadequate food. The
    fitness will return with exercise over time, my recommendation for energy-giving breakfast food is
    sweetened porridge or, failing that, cake. (I prefer cake but it somehow doesn't seem to be the
    right thing to be eating for breakfast.)
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    D Hall wrote:
    > After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    > afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    > (haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    > quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    > breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    > so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.

    For a non-voluminous breakfast with a good chunk of energy either a bowl of cereal (add a banana
    sliced on top) and some juice or an egg roll and juice. Wonderful though I think coffee is, it's a
    diuretic (actually dehydrates you to some extent) so not necessarily the best thing before a big
    ride. You can supplement brekkie with "little and often" nibbles of stuff like raisins or banana
    chips when you're on the move.

    > Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    > idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    > into work.

    Shouldn't take that long if you have got the basic muscles in there somewhere used to 30 milers.

    It could just be you're just slightly under the weather at the moment (even if you don't realise it:
    minor ailments can leave you simply not feeling 100% rather than having you feel actively ill).

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 19 May 2003 06:12:20 -0700, [email protected] (D Hall) wrote:

    >I was quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat
    >much breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case,
    >and if so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.

    I feel your pain. I cannot eat too much at breakfast due to IBS; the solution I suggest is to eat
    what you normally would and carry something like cereal bars for when you get going. Or maybe get up
    earlier, eat small breakfast, then get ready to go and eat second small breakfast as you hop on the
    bike, in the hope that by the time your body notices it'll be too buy pedalling to protest...

    >Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    >idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    >into work.

    Guessing: about two weeks if repeated regularly, assuming you're used to cycling (which you
    say you are).

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  6. Thus spake Michael MacClancy <[email protected]>

    > It sounds as if you've identified the problems - lack of fitness and inadequate food. The fitness
    > will come back with time, my recommendation for a high calorie, easily digestible breakfast is
    > sweetened porridge, failing that cake. (I actually prefer cake for breakfast but it somehow
    > doesn't see right.)

    Not enough food and not enough fluid methinks.

    I *love* cake. Even a big bowl of cornflakes won't keep you going for very long, I'm afraid.

    I'd suggest:

    1) A bowl of cereal (I mostly eat muesli) before leaving the house.
    2) Plenty to drink en route.
    3) A High-carbohydrate snack on arrival at work.

    The body attempts to restore glycogen supplies soon after exercise so the post-ride snack will help
    your homeward journey.

    A reasonably high carbohydrate evening meal might also help your morning commute the next day.

    You could also consider taking your ride to work faster on only two days per week and take it easy
    on the other days.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  7. hi Darren

    > Is this likely to be the case, and if so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I
    > can eat for breakfast.

    half strength orange juice in your water bottle.

    Jeremy Parker
     
  8. Tom C

    Tom C Guest

    Darren Hall wrote

    > >I was quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat
    > >much breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts).

    And don't forget the mid afternoon drop of blood sugar too. You'll need something to fuel the
    journey home. You're probably using about 3-400 calories on the journey back so don't worry too much
    about the impact on your weight.

    Tom
     
  9. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Tom C wrote:
    > Darren Hall wrote
    >
    >>> I was quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat
    >>> much breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts).
    >
    > And don't forget the mid afternoon drop of blood sugar too. You'll need something to fuel the
    > journey home. You're probably using about 3-400 calories on the journey back so don't worry too
    > much about the impact on your weight.
    >
    > Tom

    16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??
     
  10. Tom C

    Tom C Guest

    Tom wrote

    > > 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??

    Tim replied

    > A 140lb rider doing 16mph on a still day on the flat - 557 cal.
    >
    > Tim.

    I stand corrected!

    Tom www.brightfield.org.uk
     
  11. Simon Mason

    Simon Mason Guest

    "D Hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    > afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    > (haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    > quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    > breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    > so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.
    >
    > Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    > idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    > into work.

    I usually find no problem eating one of those ghastly looking Heinz "Full Breakfasts" in a tin
    on top of a couple of slices of toast. Either that or carefully microwave two eggs then put them
    on top of Marmite toast. Have a cup of strong coffee. I also take one litre of Lemon Barley
    Water or the like in the bottlecage.

    Try to set off early enough so you have plenty of time in hand and try to find the wind direction,
    so if it's a headwind allow another 10 mins. You can do yourself in upping your speed if you are
    running late.

    --
    Simon Mason Anlaby East Yorkshire. 53°44'N 0°26'W http://www.simonmason.karoo.net
     
  12. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Tim Woodall wrote:

    >> 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??
    >>
    > http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/9.23.html
    >
    > A 140lb rider doing 16mph on a still day on the flat - 557 cal.
    >
    > Tim.

    That's quite suprising as I burn ~85 calories during 5 minute stints on a rowing machine covering
    about 1250m each time.
     
  13. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Mon, 19 May 2003 18:41:44 GMT,
    Tenex <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Tim Woodall wrote:
    >
    >>> 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??
    >>>
    >> http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/9.23.html
    >>
    >> A 140lb rider doing 16mph on a still day on the flat - 557 cal.
    >>
    >> Tim.
    >
    > That's quite suprising as I burn ~85 calories during 5 minute stints on a rowing machine covering
    > about 1250m each time.
    >
    85cal*4200J/cal=357000J
    357000J/300sec = 1200W

    557*4200/3600 = 650W.

    So in a five minute rowing stint you are burning calories at less than twice the rate that a fairly
    mediocre cyclist might be able to maintain for an hour or more.

    Regards,

    Tim

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  14. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Tim Woodall wrote:
    > On Mon, 19 May 2003 18:41:44 GMT,
    > Tenex <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Tim Woodall wrote:
    >>
    >>>> 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??
    >>>>
    >>> http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/9.23.html
    >>>
    >>> A 140lb rider doing 16mph on a still day on the flat - 557 cal.
    >>>
    >>> Tim.
    >>
    >> That's quite suprising as I burn ~85 calories during 5 minute stints on a rowing machine covering
    >> about 1250m each time.
    >>
    > 85cal*4200J/cal=357000J
    > 357000J/300sec = 1200W
    >
    > 557*4200/3600 = 650W.
    >
    > So in a five minute rowing stint you are burning calories at less than twice the rate that a
    > fairly mediocre cyclist might be able to maintain for an hour or more.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > Tim

    Errrr I think I follow that. So the rower is quite a useful exercise machine? Seems like a
    reasonable rate of calorie burning. Shame there's no fresh air / car fumes etc. ;-)

    Pity I can't row as well as two years ago as I was much fitter then.
     
  15. Neal Milne

    Neal Milne Guest

    "D Hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After cycling to work for the first time this morning (about 16 miles), I was unusually wasted
    > afterwards. Normally I'm used to doing about 30-40 miles when I'm out on my bike recreationally
    > (haven't been out much this year though) and don't usually have any problems, which is why I was
    > quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't eat much
    > breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts). Is this likely to be the case, and if
    > so, can anyone suggest any decent non-voluminous stuff I can eat for breakfast.
    >
    > Alternatively, this could be 'cos I'm just totally unfit at the moment, if so, has anyone any
    > idea how long it may take to get into condition so I don't feel like I'm going to die when I get
    > into work.
    >
    > cheers in advance for any advice.
    >
    > Darren.

    Give your body a couple of weeks to get used to it. When I started commuting the 17miles to work I
    felt drained and needed a cereal bar or similar when I got into work. Now I can manage OK on a bowl
    of muesli for breakfast and a sandwich and a bit of fruit at lunchtime.

    Neal
     
  16. Mike Farnes

    Mike Farnes Guest

    "Neal Milne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Give your body a couple of weeks to get used to it. When I started commuting the 17miles to work I
    > felt drained and needed a cereal bar or similar when I got into work. Now I can manage OK on a
    > bowl of muesli for breakfast and a sandwich and a bit of fruit at lunchtime.
    >
    > Neal

    This sounds like good advice. Commuting can be surprisingly strenuous compared to a leisurely
    recreational ride. There's probably a lot more starting and stopping; sometimes you need to sprint a
    little when you're overtaking and the traffic suddenly speeds up; you may feel pressured into going
    a bit faster if someone can't get past you, etc.

    Personally I only have a small bowl of cornflakes and a glass of water before my 15-mile commute. I
    certainly don't have anything special the night before and I rarely have a drink on the way (unless
    it's particularly hot). I do enjoy a jam sandwich and some water when I arrive at work, though.

    As Neal says, just give yourself time and maybe learn to take things a little easier if necessary.

    Mike
     
  17. D Hall

    D Hall Guest

    "Neal Milne" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    Thanks to all for the advice, it all sounds very sensible.

    I think what I'll do is only cycle to work every other day for a couple of weeks until I get used to
    it and experiment with the breakfasts. Cake and diluted orange juice sounds like something I could
    get used to though.

    Incidentally, I had no problems on the return journey yesterday (apart from the persistent
    torrential rain!) after pigging out all day so I think it must have been the breakfast problem.

    Darren.
     
  18. Thus spake "Tenex" <[email protected]>

    > Tom C wrote:
    > > Darren Hall wrote
    > >
    > >>> I was quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't
    > >>> eat much breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts).
    > >
    > > And don't forget the mid afternoon drop of blood sugar too. You'll need something to fuel the
    > > journey home. You're probably using about 3-400 calories on the journey back so don't worry too
    > > much about the impact on your weight.
    > >
    > > Tom

    > 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??

    I reckon 3-400 Kcal is a reasonable guesstimate for ~1 hour of moderate exertion.

    An elite athlete going flat out for an our might burn 6-700 Kcal but would cover rather more
    than 16 miles.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  19. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    > Thus spake "Tenex" <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    >> Tom C wrote:
    >>> Darren Hall wrote
    >>>
    >>>>> I was quite alarmed at how knackered I was this morning. I suspect this is because I didn't
    >>>>> eat much breakfast before I left (not really keen on big breakfasts).
    >>>
    >>> And don't forget the mid afternoon drop of blood sugar too. You'll need something to fuel the
    >>> journey home. You're probably using about 3-400 calories on the journey back so don't worry too
    >>> much about the impact on your weight.
    >>>
    >>> Tom
    >
    >> 16 miles must surely be more than 3-400 calories??
    >
    >
    > I reckon 3-400 Kcal is a reasonable guesstimate for ~1 hour of moderate exertion.
    >
    > An elite athlete going flat out for an our might burn 6-700 Kcal but would cover rather more than
    > 16 miles.

    See Tim's post 557 Kcal is the result.
     
  20. Porridge topped with sliced banana and a dash of milk. Lovely stuff and enough to keep the hunger
    pangs from this fatbirdonabike until lunchtime. Easily made in the microwave too.

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Clean up the waste & get rid of the trapped wind to send a reply

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
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