Trouser Crisis

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Dulwich Cyclist, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. In a vain attempt to create a wardrobe that is comfortable on the bike and
    presentable in meetings, without getting changed, i recently bought a pair
    of Gore Windstopper trousers in the Evans sale at the Cut in Waterloo £50
    from £74.
    I would not recommend them as front pockets are not deep and side cargo
    pockets not secure enough to retain keys and change when sitting down.
    Anyone got any better solutions?
    Paul
     
    Tags:


  2. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Dulwich Cyclist wrote:

    > In a vain attempt to create a wardrobe that is comfortable on the bike and
    > presentable in meetings, without getting changed, i recently bought a pair
    > of Gore Windstopper trousers in the Evans sale at the Cut in Waterloo ï½£50
    > from ï½£74.
    > I would not recommend them as front pockets are not deep and side cargo
    > pockets not secure enough to retain keys and change when sitting down.
    > Anyone got any better solutions?


    I use a small bum-bag for things like keys, money, pda. It gets less
    sweaty than a rear shirt pocket (which a lot of my cycling clothing
    doesn't have anyway) and things don't rattle around, plus it keeps the
    valuables together conveniently.

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  3. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Sorry to pervert your thread, but I've a question about Ronhill
    bikesters. Thanks to the regulars for the recommendation, by the way,
    I bought the el cheapo version and they're so good I want to get more.
    There are a whole lot of similar ones on wiggle, though, and I'm not
    sure if I should get any of the other versions?
     
  4. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I use a small bum-bag for things like keys, money, pda. It gets less
    : sweaty than a rear shirt pocket (which a lot of my cycling clothing
    : doesn't have anyway) and things don't rattle around, plus it keeps the
    : valuables together conveniently.

    The trouble is that the OP asked for a better solution :) Bum bags
    are just look so awful that I can't contemplate wearing them as
    an everyday item of clothing.

    --
    Arthur Clune PGP/GPG Key: http://www.clune.org/pubkey.txt
    It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness
     
  5. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:

    > James Annan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : I use a small bum-bag for things like keys, money, pda. It gets less
    > : sweaty than a rear shirt pocket (which a lot of my cycling clothing
    > : doesn't have anyway) and things don't rattle around, plus it keeps the
    > : valuables together conveniently.
    >
    > The trouble is that the OP asked for a better solution :) Bum bags
    > are just look so awful that I can't contemplate wearing them as
    > an everyday item of clothing.


    You can take it off at your destination!

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  6. "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Sorry to pervert your thread, but I've a question about Ronhill
    > bikesters. Thanks to the regulars for the recommendation, by the way,
    > I bought the el cheapo version and they're so good I want to get more.
    > There are a whole lot of similar ones on wiggle, though, and I'm not
    > sure if I should get any of the other versions?
    >


    I've got a pair of the Field & Trek version of Bikesters and they aren't
    *quite* the same - less high at the back a tad I think. I prefer the real
    thing ;-) Anyhow, you can pick up Bikesters for £11.99 on Wiggle & about the
    same on ProBikeKit, which is remarkably reasonable. On the point of looking
    "normal" I suppose one could always remove the reflective band from the rear
    of each leg by simply carefully unpicking the stitching, so they they have
    more of a "normal" look about them. Could always use reflective/fluorescent
    trouser clips for added visibility when on the bike.

    Cheers, helen s
     
  7. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Dulwich Cyclist wrote:
    > In a vain attempt to create a wardrobe that is comfortable on the bike and
    > presentable in meetings, without getting changed


    It would help if you define "presentable in meetings" more closely...

    For reasonably presentable kit which is okay on a bike, I'd look at
    travel clothing as it's designed to be not too scruffy while preserving
    freedom of action and usually relying on fairly high-spec fabrics that
    are fast drying and light, all handy on a bike. Rohan have taken this
    approach up to formal business suit levels if that's a degree of
    smartness you need, though there are plenty of choices for "fairly
    smart" if you can get away with that. Any outdoor shop should have a
    pile, as travel clothing is apparently the New Black.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  8. Thanks for the rohan suggestion
    i want to avoid trouserclips and tucking trousers in socks.
    So the wrap around bits on cycling trousers are good for that.
    Presentable means for me it's ok to look cycley but not too cycley.
    I commute to london and want to get off the bike and go into a meeting
    without changing.
    Thanks all who posted.
    paul

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Dulwich Cyclist wrote:
    > > In a vain attempt to create a wardrobe that is comfortable on the bike

    and
    > > presentable in meetings, without getting changed

    >
    > It would help if you define "presentable in meetings" more closely...
    >
    > For reasonably presentable kit which is okay on a bike, I'd look at
    > travel clothing as it's designed to be not too scruffy while preserving
    > freedom of action and usually relying on fairly high-spec fabrics that
    > are fast drying and light, all handy on a bike. Rohan have taken this
    > approach up to formal business suit levels if that's a degree of
    > smartness you need, though there are plenty of choices for "fairly
    > smart" if you can get away with that. Any outdoor shop should have a
    > pile, as travel clothing is apparently the New Black.
    >
    > Pete.
    > --
    > Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    > Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    > Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    > net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
    >
     
  9. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Helen C Simmons wrote:
    >
    > I've got a pair of the Field & Trek version of Bikesters and they

    aren't
    > *quite* the same - less high at the back a tad I think. I prefer the

    real
    > thing ;-) Anyhow, you can pick up Bikesters for £11.99 on Wiggle &

    about the
    > same on ProBikeKit, which is remarkably reasonable. On the point of

    looking
    > "normal" I suppose one could always remove the reflective band from

    the rear
    > of each leg by simply carefully unpicking the stitching, so they they

    have
    > more of a "normal" look about them. Could always use

    reflective/fluorescent
    > trouser clips for added visibility when on the bike.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s


    Cheers, yes I remember reading your previous post to that effect. I've
    got the 11.99 jobbies from wiggle, I was wondering if the more
    expensive versions were any better since they mention "waterproofing".
    Otherwise I'll just get some more of the el cheapos.

    Luckily I don't need to worry about looking "presentable" like Dulwich
    cyclist in my job, lycra is fine. By coincidence I live only just down
    the road too.
     
  10. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]


    >Cheers, yes I remember reading your previous post to that effect. I've
    >got the 11.99 jobbies from wiggle, I was wondering if the more
    >expensive versions were any better since they mention "waterproofing".
    >Otherwise I'll just get some more of the el cheapos.



    I haven't got any of the more expensive ones. I have a pair of waterproof
    overtrousers which I've worn exactly zero times. I find that for the rain
    generally, the Bikesters dry out so quickly that getting wet isn't actually
    a problem. if it's cold I stick a pair of longjohns on underneath and so
    far, that's been perfectly adequate for the cycling I do. Nathan has a pair
    of same overtrousers (Tchibo special...) and he's used them over the winter
    for cycling to & from college in the rain if it's been heavy'ish rain.

    >Luckily I don't need to worry about looking "presentable" like Dulwich
    >cyclist in my job, lycra is fine. By coincidence I live only just down
    >the road too.


    Down the road from me or Dulwich cyclist??

    Cheers, helen s
     
  11. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    LSMike wrote:

    > Cheers, yes I remember reading your previous post to that effect. I've
    > got the 11.99 jobbies from wiggle, I was wondering if the more
    > expensive versions were any better since they mention "waterproofing".


    DXB isn't waterproofing, it's a light repellency treatment that helps
    keep drizzle from soaking in too quickly. It helps a bit, but do /not/
    expect "waterproof". You'll dry out pretty quickly even in standard
    tracksters/bikesters.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  12. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    > I haven't got any of the more expensive ones. I have a pair of

    waterproof
    > overtrousers which I've worn exactly zero times. I find that for the

    rain
    > generally, the Bikesters dry out so quickly that getting wet isn't

    actually
    > a problem.


    LOL me too. Only time I've used the overtrousers is when it's really
    cold as emergency extra warmth.

    > if it's cold I stick a pair of longjohns on underneath and so
    > far, that's been perfectly adequate for the cycling I do. Nathan has

    a pair
    > of same overtrousers (Tchibo special...) and he's used them over the

    winter
    > for cycling to & from college in the rain if it's been heavy'ish

    rain.
    >
    > >Luckily I don't need to worry about looking "presentable" like

    Dulwich
    > >cyclist in my job, lycra is fine. By coincidence I live only just

    down
    > >the road too.

    >
    > Down the road from me or Dulwich cyclist??


    Dulwich Cyclist. Hopefully I'm out of range down here. ;)

    > Cheers, helen s


    Cheers,
    Mike.
     
  13. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > DXB isn't waterproofing, it's a light repellency treatment that helps


    > keep drizzle from soaking in too quickly. It helps a bit, but do

    /not/
    > expect "waterproof". You'll dry out pretty quickly even in standard
    > tracksters/bikesters.
    >


    Cheers, much as I thought, hence the "". :)
     
  14. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 16/2/05 10:55 am, in article
    [email protected], "LSMike"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > wafflycat wrote:
    >> I haven't got any of the more expensive ones. I have a pair of

    > waterproof
    >> overtrousers which I've worn exactly zero times. I find that for the

    > rain
    >> generally, the Bikesters dry out so quickly that getting wet isn't

    > actually
    >> a problem.

    >
    > LOL me too. Only time I've used the overtrousers is when it's really
    > cold as emergency extra warmth.


    Same here. The only time I have worn overtrousers for cycling was when it
    was -10 or colder.

    ...d
     
  15. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David Martin wrote:

    > Same here. The only time I have worn overtrousers for cycling was when it
    > was -10 or colder.


    If I've got an A to B and it's sheeting it down before I even start,
    I'll pop them on and be glad, or if there's the prospect of riding for
    hours through non-stop Real Rain on a coldish day I'll use them. Other
    than that we are in Stan territory though...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  16. On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 11:24:01 +0000, Peter Clinch
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >are fast drying and light, all handy on a bike. Rohan have taken this
    >approach up to formal business suit levels if that's a degree of
    >smartness you need, though there are plenty of choices for "fairly
    >smart" if you can get away with that. Any outdoor shop should have a
    >pile, as travel clothing is apparently the New Black.


    Oooh, there is a Rohan near me - I've never been in before. I always
    thought it was some hairdresser or massage parlour or something...

    --
    Jesus was apparently betrayed by 8.3% of his disciples.
     
  17. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Richard Bates wrote:

    > Oooh, there is a Rohan near me - I've never been in before. I always
    > thought it was some hairdresser or massage parlour or something...


    Be warned that many regular Rohan users only ever buy stuff in the
    sales, when the prices come down to what you might normally think should
    be the regular prices... cheap they ain't, but their stuff generally
    does what it says on the tin IME.

    I've not come across anyone else using quite the same approach for
    travel clothing up to business suits, but for more everyday looking
    stuff there are plenty of alternatives in other outdoor shops.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  18. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "LSMike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...

    Cheers, yes I remember reading your previous post to that effect. I've
    got the 11.99 jobbies from wiggle, I was wondering if the more
    expensive versions were any better since they mention "waterproofing".
    Otherwise I'll just get some more of the el cheapos.

    Luckily I don't need to worry about looking "presentable" like Dulwich
    cyclist in my job, lycra is fine. By coincidence I live only just down
    the road too.

    Just a bit of feedback. I was cycling tonight in some fairly determined
    heavy drizzle. My legs basically didn't get wet and remained warm- I was
    wearing basic RonHill Bikesters.

    Cheers, helen s
     
Loading...
Loading...