Truckers Views of Cyclists



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A

Andy

Guest
Cycling along today on a narrowish bendy stretch of road I realised there was a lorry behind which
couldn't safely overtake so I bumped up on the pavement to let it by as I generally do so long as
I'm not going to mow down any 2 yr olds in the process. A mile or so further on I happened to meet
the same trucker when I stopped at one of those catering trailers you find in lay-bys and industrial
estates. After thanking me for letting him pass it became apparent that my helpful actions were
considered extremely rare amongst the assembled truckers and that generally cyclists are arrogant
gits with no consideration for other road users whatsoever.

After a bit of thinking I pointed out that people on road bikes with expensive skinny wheels
probably wouldn't want to bump up over kerbs and that some strange people genuinely do believe the
law is the law is the law so they wouldn't cycle on pavements if their lives depended on it. The
truckers pointed out that the highway code advises any slow moving road user to pull in to let other
traffic pass and that even when a suitable pull in spot presented itself the vast majority of
cyclists would ignore it. Not to mention those that ride 2 or 3 abreast stopping traffic which could
otherwise pass.....etc etc.

I conceded that yes a lot of cyclists are arrogant gits and ate my bacon roll.
 
W

W K

Guest
"Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> The truckers pointed out that the highway code advises any slow moving road user to pull in to
> let other traffic pass and that even when a suitable
pull
> in spot presented itself the vast majority of cyclists would ignore it.

When have you ever held up traffic for more than a couple of seconds?

Perhaps you should tell them that lane 2 on a motorway is for overtaking, and that overtaking
requires one of them to go faster than the other.
 
A

Alex Graham

Guest
Andy wrote:
> Cycling along today on a narrowish bendy stretch of road I realised there was a lorry behind which
> couldn't safely overtake so I bumped up on the pavement to let it by as I generally do so long as
> I'm not going to mow down any 2 yr olds in the process. A mile or so further on I happened to meet
> the same trucker when I stopped at one of those catering trailers you find in lay-bys and
> industrial estates. After thanking me for letting him pass it became apparent that my helpful
> actions were considered extremely rare amongst the assembled truckers and that generally cyclists
> are arrogant gits with no consideration for other road users whatsoever.
>
> After a bit of thinking I pointed out that people on road bikes with expensive skinny wheels
> probably wouldn't want to bump up over kerbs and that some strange people genuinely do believe the
> law is the law is the law so they wouldn't cycle on pavements if their lives depended on it. The
> truckers pointed out that the highway code advises any slow moving road user to pull in to let
> other traffic pass and that even when a suitable pull in spot presented itself the vast majority
> of cyclists would ignore it. Not to mention those that ride 2 or 3 abreast stopping traffic which
> could otherwise pass.....etc etc.

Personally I don't like holding other road users up, as long as they behave in a reasonably
civilised manner. More often than not, if I am turning right, if there is another car turning right
as well they often try and cut accross while I am turning, so drive behind very close and beep for
me to move over. Mostly this happens before I have completed the turn, at which point I would return
to the gutter and they can then do whatever.

The most pathetic thing about it all is the fact that I invariably have to re-overtake the same car
when it is either stationary or in slow moving traffic.

In the same way some cyclists let the side down a lot of motorists do as well.

--

-Alex

----------------------------------
[email protected]

http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/cycling.php http://www.westerleycycling.org.uk
----------------------------------
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
W K <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Perhaps you should tell them that lane 2 on a motorway is for overtaking, and that overtaking
> requires one of them to go faster than the other.

Especially on a two lane motorway. Travelled 10 miles on the A1M on Wednesday behind a truck that
couldn't go fast enough to pass the inside truck but didn't want to stay behind it.

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Alex Graham <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Personally I don't like holding other road users up, as long as they behave in a reasonably
> civilised manner.

Curiously I find my willingness to let them go on their way is directly proportional to the
consideration they show me. Sat on my tail revving their engines and showing impatience its amazing
how wide I am and how long before I find a convenient pull in. Sit back with a bit of patience and I
will be out of their way with a thank you wave as soon as I can. More haste, less speed as they say.

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
B

Bob

Guest
Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Alex Graham <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > Personally I don't like holding other road users up, as long as they behave in a reasonably
> > civilised manner.
>
> Curiously I find my willingness to let them go on their way is directly proportional to the
> consideration they show me. Sat on my tail revving their engines and showing impatience its
> amazing how wide I am and how
long
> before I find a convenient pull in. Sit back with a bit of patience and I will be out of their way
> with a thank you wave as soon as I can. More haste, less speed as they say.
>
> Tony

Just a little point - the truck probably wasn't revving out of frustration or impatience - the
driver needs to rev in order to double-clutch and change down gear.

Anyway I'm a firm believer that we should all have a go at every mode of transport. Maybe then we'd
understand the needs of other road users and show a bit more consideration.

Bob
 
S

Simon Proven

Guest
Andy wrote:

> The truckers pointed out that the highway code advises any slow moving road user to pull in to
> let other traffic pass and that even when a suitable pull in spot presented itself the vast
> majority of cyclists would ignore it.

This is fairly typical of most road users: a half remembered HC rule. The actual rule is rule 145:

"Do not hold up a long queue of traffic, especially if you are driving a large or slow moving
vehicle. Check your mirrors frequently, and if necessary, pull in where it is safe and let
traffic pass."

I think I'm going to have to start carrying my copy of the HC with me on the bike for these sorts of
conversations.
 
C

Call Me Bob

Guest
On Thu, 24 Apr 2003 21:07:59 +0100, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

>Anyway I'm a firm believer that we should all have a go at every mode of transport.

Good idea, couldn't agree more. Now then, I'll go first with the hot air balloon and
catamaran, shall I?

Bob
--
Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
 
G

Geoff Bowles

Guest
I do my best - over something like 50 years I've been an enthusiast for cars, motorcycles, road
bikes and mountain bikes, as well as being a very active pedestrian (not to mention canoes, kayaks,
skis and rock climbing!). On public roads, I've always regarded any mode of transport - from a
bicycle to a minibus - as a vehicle, subject to the same laws and rules as other road users. Yes,
that means I stop at red traffic lights if I'm on my bike, I don't overtake bicycles in my car if
the roads too narrow/blind or there's oncoming traffic, and I never drive or pedal on pavements. For
me, it's not so much a question of abiding by the law as of common courtesy and good manners. For
the same reason, I don't have a lot of patience with people who flout the rules - especially if they
then try to justify their actions- usually quite aggressively!

While there are always exceptions, I've found the most considerate road users to be motor-cyclists
and professional drivers (e.g. bus and truck drivers). Sad to say, the stroppiest and least
considerate road users often seem to be cyclists...

> >Anyway I'm a firm believer that we should all have a go at every mode of transport.
 
A

Arthur Clune

Guest
Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
: in spot presented itself the vast majority of cyclists would ignore it. Not to mention those that
: ride 2 or 3 abreast stopping traffic which could otherwise pass.....etc etc.

This one often comes up, but many times riders riding 2 abrest are a) not any wider than one rider
(since one rider has to stay out from the kerb) and b) easier to pass, being shorter.

The trouble with riding singled out all the time is that you soon find that it leads drivers to try
and overtake, realise that they are not going to make it, and then try and pull back in in the
middle of the group. This is very dangerous.

All the groups I ride with ride 2 abrest, but then swap into a single line to let cars past if
there's not enough room for them to pass the double line and it's safe for them to pass.

Arthur

--
Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
Lord Lester
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Just a little point - the truck probably wasn't revving out of frustration or impatience - the
> driver needs to rev in order to double-clutch and change down gear.
>

I can easily hear the difference between a double declutch downshift and revving the engine
accompanied with his hissing of air brakes to indicate frustration at my being there.

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Call me Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Thu, 24 Apr 2003 21:07:59 +0100, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Anyway I'm a firm believer that we should all have a go at every mode of transport.
>
> Good idea, couldn't agree more. Now then, I'll go first with the hot air balloon and catamaran,
> shall I?
>

Bags I Schumacher's Ferrari

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
B

Bob

Guest
Tony Raven <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > Just a little point - the truck probably wasn't revving out of
frustration
> > or impatience - the driver needs to rev in order to double-clutch and change down gear.
> >
>
> I can easily hear the difference between a double declutch downshift and revving the engine
> accompanied with his hissing of air brakes to indicate frustration at my being there.
>
> Tony

Gee, braking and accelerating at the same time - now that's clever!

Bob
 
B

Bob

Guest
Call me Bob <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> On Thu, 24 Apr 2003 21:07:59 +0100, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Anyway I'm a firm believer that we should all have a go at every mode of transport.
>
> Good idea, couldn't agree more. Now then, I'll go first with the hot air balloon and catamaran,
> shall I?

Get behind me in the queue - I've been waiting eighteen months since my original booking for
"suitable" weather to go up in a balloon.

Bob
 
C

Chris Malcolm

Guest
"Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

>Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

>: in spot presented itself the vast majority of cyclists would ignore it. Not to mention those that
>: ride 2 or 3 abreast stopping traffic which could otherwise pass.....etc etc.

>This one often comes up, but many times riders riding 2 abrest are a) not any wider than one rider
>(since one rider has to stay out from the kerb) and b) easier to pass, being shorter.

>The trouble with riding singled out all the time is that you soon find that it leads drivers to try
>and overtake, realise that they are not going to make it, and then try and pull back in in the
>middle of the group. This is very dangerous.

>All the groups I ride with ride 2 abrest, but then swap into a single line to let cars past if
>there's not enough room for them to pass the double line and it's safe for them to pass.

Cyclists are very dangerous. Look at how many bike accidents involve another bike. Keep well away
from other cyclists.

--
Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 650 3085 School of Artificial Intelligence, Division of
Informatics Edinburgh University, 5 Forrest Hill, Edinburgh, EH1 2QL, UK
[http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/daidb/people/homes/cam/ ] DoD #205
 
G

Gadget

Guest
I've had truck drivers pull across roundabouts just to impede traffic for me to get across and in
case I was mistaken he actually gave me the signal to move off the junction. Another truck driver
that works for the same company as myself once said "cyclist and lorry driver are the two most hated
road users. We're in the way and too slow"

Just my pennysworth

Gadget
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Bob <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Gee, braking and accelerating at the same time - now that's clever!
>

You've never learnt to "heel and toe". Pretty standard fare in any competitive motorsport.

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
"Bob" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

> Gee, braking and accelerating at the same time - now that's clever!

But by no means impossible. Racing drivers do this to be able to double declutch under braking. Toes
on the brake pedal, side of the foot on the gas. Known in the trade as "heel and toe".

I doubt the lorry driver was doing this though. Probably alternating them for maximum noise and
intimidation, as you were no doubt aware.

--
Dave...
 
R

Richard J Webb

Guest
>"Do not hold up a long queue of traffic, especially if you are driving a large or slow moving
>vehicle. Check your mirrors frequently, and if necessary, pull in where it is safe and let
>traffic pass."
>

<cager mode> Tell that to the the flat cap brigade </cager mode>

Richard Webb
 
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