Truly remarkable statin result?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Peter, Jul 18, 2003.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Six months ago, about a year after a quad bypass I was being treated
    for slightly high blood pressure but not being treated for high
    cholesterol. Cholesterol level 8.0.

    The consultant advised seeing the effect of cholesterol lowering
    margerine over three months. The (surprisingly palatable) margerine
    was taken as per manufacturer's instructions for the three months.
    Cholesterol dropped from 8.0 to 7.4.

    The consultant then prescribed Rosuvastatin (10mg\day) with
    continuing margerine. Three months later I was told that my
    cholesterol level was 3.5.

    What concerns me is that the drop seems to be too good to be true!
    There are difficulties in getting a re-test within six months.

    Please can one or more knowledgeable people tell me whether this
    remarkable drop is possible, or is it more likely to be the result
    of a botched path-lab test or a clerical error?

    Thanks for your constructive comments.

    Peter
     
    Tags:


  2. Dr Chaos

    Dr Chaos Guest

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 00:12:18 +0000 (UTC), Peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Six months ago, about a year after a quad bypass I was being treated
    > for slightly high blood pressure but not being treated for high
    > cholesterol. Cholesterol level 8.0.
    >
    > The consultant advised seeing the effect of cholesterol lowering
    > margerine over three months. The (surprisingly palatable) margerine
    > was taken as per manufacturer's instructions for the three months.
    > Cholesterol dropped from 8.0 to 7.4.
    >
    > The consultant then prescribed Rosuvastatin (10mg\day) with
    > continuing margerine. Three months later I was told that my
    > cholesterol level was 3.5.
    >
    > What concerns me is that the drop seems to be too good to be true!
    > There are difficulties in getting a re-test within six months.
    >
    > Please can one or more knowledgeable people tell me whether this
    > remarkable drop is possible, or is it more likely to be the result
    > of a botched path-lab test or a clerical error?


    It is possible. According to one study, rosuvastatin is even better
    than the market leader (atorvastatin, aka Lipitor) at gettting LDL
    to target levels.

    According to the study results below, rosuvastatin 10mg lowered LDL by
    49% in the patient study population. I will assume that is some kind
    of average or median, and thus your 52.7% result (7.4 -> 3.5) in total
    cholesterol seems within range of reasonably expected statistical
    fluctuations.

    ----------------------------

    ACC: Crestor (Rosuvastatin) Lowers LDL Cholesterol, Reaches Target Lipid Levels

    ORLANDO, FL -- March 20, 2001-- Data show that Crestor (rosuvastatin -
    previously known as ZD4522), AstraZeneca’s new statin, is superior to
    the most widely prescribed statins, including atorvastatin, in terms
    of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and getting more
    patients to their target lipid levels.

    Crestor also raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol
    significantly more than atorvastatin, according to data from Phase III
    clinical trial results presented today at the 50th Annual Scientific
    Session of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).

    "Heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of hospitalization
    and death for both men and women in Canada", says Dr. Lawrence Leiter,
    Head, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael’s
    Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. "Too many Canadians continue to have
    unacceptably high levels of cholesterol, despite the fact that we know
    hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular
    disease. The aggressive LDL [low-density lipoprotein] reductions that
    can be achieved with drugs like Crestor should certainly help bring
    more patients’ cholesterol to optimal levels."

    Data from two head-to-head comparative trials involving over 1,000
    patients show a significantly better reduction in LDL cholesterol (a
    major marker for the development of cardiovascular disease) with
    Crestor, compared to other widely prescribed statins.1,2 In one study,
    LDL cholesterol was reduced by 49 percent with Crestor 10 mg compared
    to 37 percent with simvastatin 20 mg and 28 percent with pravastatin
    20 mg.2 In another study, Crestor 10 mg reduced LDL cholesterol by 43
    percent compared to a 35 percent reduction with atorvastatin 10mg.1

    In addition to LDL cholesterol lowering, Crestor 10 mg produced a
    significantly greater increase in HDL cholesterol compared with
    atorvastatin 10 mg (12 percent versus 8 percent, respectively) and a
    similar increase compared to simvastatin and pravastatin.1,2
    Triglyceride levels were effectively reduced to the same extent by all
    the statins. All studies also show that Crestor is safe and well
    tolerated, similar to other statins.1,2,3

    Greater numbers of patients reach target cholesterol levels within
    guidelines

    "A number of recent Canadian research studies have demonstrated that
    the majority of Canadian patients fail to achieve their LDL
    cholesterol goals," says Dr. Leiter. "In the studies reported today, a
    greater proportion of patients treated with rosuvastatin reached their
    LDL target relative to those treated with comparative statins."

    In the comparative trial versus pravastatin and simvastatin, 91
    percent of medium-risk patients attained target LDL-cholesterol goals
    (as defined by the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Expert
    Panel4) with Crestor 10 mg compared to 45 percent of similar patients
    achieving goal with pravastatin 20 mg, and 68 percent with simvastatin
    20 mg. In the high-risk category, 67 percent of patients achieved
    target levels with Crestor 10 mg versus only seven percent with
    pravastatin 20 mg and 19 percent with simvastatin 20 mg.2

    Similar findings were observed in the comparative trial with
    atorvastatin. Eighty-seven percent of medium-risk patients attained
    target LDL cholesterol goals (as defined by the National Cholesterol
    Education Program Expert Panel4) with Crestor 10 mg compared with 72
    percent of similar patients with atorvastatin 10 mg. In the high-risk
    category, 47 percent of patients achieved target levels with Crestor
    10 mg versus only 19 percent with atorvastatin 10 mg.1

    "These findings are crucial because the majority of patients are
    initiated and remain on a statin at the lowest available dose, which
    is why so many currently fail to reach their goal. It is therefore
    logical to give patients the most effective statin," states
    Dr. Michael Davidson, President of the Chicago Center for Clinical
    Research, and Principal Investigator for the study that compared
    Crestor to atorvastatin.





    >
    > Thanks for your constructive comments.
    >
    > Peter



    --
    ---------------------------------------------
    Matthew Kennel, [email protected]
    Institute For Nonlinear Science, UC San Diego
    ---------------------------------------------
     
  3. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Thank you for your reassuring answer to my question.

    Peter

    On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 00:40:39 +0000 (UTC), Dr Chaos
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 19 Jul 2003 00:12:18 +0000 (UTC), Peter <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Six months ago, about a year after a quad bypass I was being treated
    >> for slightly high blood pressure but not being treated for high
    >> cholesterol. Cholesterol level 8.0.
    >>
    >> The consultant advised seeing the effect of cholesterol lowering
    >> margerine over three months. The (surprisingly palatable) margerine
    >> was taken as per manufacturer's instructions for the three months.
    >> Cholesterol dropped from 8.0 to 7.4.
    >>
    >> The consultant then prescribed Rosuvastatin (10mg\day) with
    >> continuing margerine. Three months later I was told that my
    >> cholesterol level was 3.5.
    >>
    >> What concerns me is that the drop seems to be too good to be true!
    >> There are difficulties in getting a re-test within six months.
    >>
    >> Please can one or more knowledgeable people tell me whether this
    >> remarkable drop is possible, or is it more likely to be the result
    >> of a botched path-lab test or a clerical error?

    >
    >It is possible. According to one study, rosuvastatin is even better
    >than the market leader (atorvastatin, aka Lipitor) at gettting LDL
    >to target levels.
    >
    >According to the study results below, rosuvastatin 10mg lowered LDL by
    >49% in the patient study population. I will assume that is some kind
    >of average or median, and thus your 52.7% result (7.4 -> 3.5) in total
    >cholesterol seems within range of reasonably expected statistical
    >fluctuations.
    >
    >----------------------------
    >
    >ACC: Crestor (Rosuvastatin) Lowers LDL Cholesterol, Reaches Target Lipid Levels
    >
    >ORLANDO, FL -- March 20, 2001-- Data show that Crestor (rosuvastatin -
    >previously known as ZD4522), AstraZeneca’s new statin, is superior to
    >the most widely prescribed statins, including atorvastatin, in terms
    >of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and getting more
    >patients to their target lipid levels.
    >
    >Crestor also raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol
    >significantly more than atorvastatin, according to data from Phase III
    >clinical trial results presented today at the 50th Annual Scientific
    >Session of the American College of Cardiology (ACC).
    >
    >"Heart disease and stroke remain the leading causes of hospitalization
    >and death for both men and women in Canada", says Dr. Lawrence Leiter,
    >Head, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael’s
    >Hospital, Toronto, Ontario. "Too many Canadians continue to have
    >unacceptably high levels of cholesterol, despite the fact that we know
    >hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular
    >disease. The aggressive LDL [low-density lipoprotein] reductions that
    >can be achieved with drugs like Crestor should certainly help bring
    >more patients’ cholesterol to optimal levels."
    >
    >Data from two head-to-head comparative trials involving over 1,000
    >patients show a significantly better reduction in LDL cholesterol (a
    >major marker for the development of cardiovascular disease) with
    >Crestor, compared to other widely prescribed statins.1,2 In one study,
    >LDL cholesterol was reduced by 49 percent with Crestor 10 mg compared
    >to 37 percent with simvastatin 20 mg and 28 percent with pravastatin
    >20 mg.2 In another study, Crestor 10 mg reduced LDL cholesterol by 43
    >percent compared to a 35 percent reduction with atorvastatin 10mg.1
    >
    >In addition to LDL cholesterol lowering, Crestor 10 mg produced a
    >significantly greater increase in HDL cholesterol compared with
    >atorvastatin 10 mg (12 percent versus 8 percent, respectively) and a
    >similar increase compared to simvastatin and pravastatin.1,2
    >Triglyceride levels were effectively reduced to the same extent by all
    >the statins. All studies also show that Crestor is safe and well
    >tolerated, similar to other statins.1,2,3
    >
    >Greater numbers of patients reach target cholesterol levels within
    >guidelines
    >
    >"A number of recent Canadian research studies have demonstrated that
    >the majority of Canadian patients fail to achieve their LDL
    >cholesterol goals," says Dr. Leiter. "In the studies reported today, a
    >greater proportion of patients treated with rosuvastatin reached their
    >LDL target relative to those treated with comparative statins."
    >
    >In the comparative trial versus pravastatin and simvastatin, 91
    >percent of medium-risk patients attained target LDL-cholesterol goals
    >(as defined by the U.S. National Cholesterol Education Program Expert
    >Panel4) with Crestor 10 mg compared to 45 percent of similar patients
    >achieving goal with pravastatin 20 mg, and 68 percent with simvastatin
    >20 mg. In the high-risk category, 67 percent of patients achieved
    >target levels with Crestor 10 mg versus only seven percent with
    >pravastatin 20 mg and 19 percent with simvastatin 20 mg.2
    >
    >Similar findings were observed in the comparative trial with
    >atorvastatin. Eighty-seven percent of medium-risk patients attained
    >target LDL cholesterol goals (as defined by the National Cholesterol
    >Education Program Expert Panel4) with Crestor 10 mg compared with 72
    >percent of similar patients with atorvastatin 10 mg. In the high-risk
    >category, 47 percent of patients achieved target levels with Crestor
    >10 mg versus only 19 percent with atorvastatin 10 mg.1
    >
    >"These findings are crucial because the majority of patients are
    >initiated and remain on a statin at the lowest available dose, which
    >is why so many currently fail to reach their goal. It is therefore
    >logical to give patients the most effective statin," states
    >Dr. Michael Davidson, President of the Chicago Center for Clinical
    >Research, and Principal Investigator for the study that compared
    >Crestor to atorvastatin.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> Thanks for your constructive comments.
    >>
    >> Peter
     
Loading...