Tube patch glue?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Kovie, May 21, 2004.

  1. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    tube of glue.

    Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're ok
    for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I get
    home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits still
    the best ones, or are the newer, better alternatives?

    --
    Kovie [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 21 May 2004 19:56:26 GMT, "Kovie" <[email protected]>
    may have said:

    >I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    >buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    >hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    >rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    >tube of glue.

    It's available separately in just about any auto parts store
    and many hardware stores, both in the small tubes and in a
    larger can. Even some farm equipment and supply stores have
    it. The glue will be in the same display with the patch
    kits, not mixed in with other adhesives.

    >Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    >ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    >get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    >still the best ones, or are the newer, better alternatives?

    Experience varies. I've had good results with the small
    Novara use-with-glue patches, but I most often use the
    traditional square Monkey Grips mostly because they're easy
    and inexpensive to get nearby...and they work perfectly
    well. Like you, I have had rotten luck with the self-stick
    patches; they may get you home, but they are not a permanent
    fix in my experience.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via
    e-mail. Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature. Words
    processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  3. Pete Grey

    Pete Grey Guest

    You can buy this in a container with a screw-top and brush.
    It's also possible to buy the patches in bulk, about 100 or
    so to a box.

    I think this is basically contact cement, but I broke down
    and spent a couple extra bucks for the real stuff.

    IMO, the old patches are by far the best still!

    -pete

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s01...
    > I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    > buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    > hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    > rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    > tube of glue.
    >
    > Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    > ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    > get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    > still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    > alternatives?
    >
    > --
    > Kovie [email protected]
     
  4. Zeeexsixare

    Zeeexsixare Guest

    > Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    > ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    > get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    > still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    > alternatives?

    To adapt to this problem, I've been beginning to use C-
    clamps to smash the patch onto the tube at a high
    compression force. I haven't had any leaks with them since.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Guest

    On 5/21/04 12:56 PM, in article [email protected]_s01, "Kovie"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    > buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    > hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    > rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    > tube of glue.
    >
    > Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    > ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    > get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    > still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    > alternatives?

    These work excellent. Regardless of the type you use to
    patch (A or B) Carry the separately packaged alcohol wipes
    (drugstore) and use one of these on the specific area BEFORE
    you patch.

    I have had excellent adhesion with the glueless patches
    after doing this. They take up much less room than an old
    fashioned patch kit AND you never have to worry about your
    glue drying up when you need it TOMORROW!!!
     
  6. ZeeExSixAre wrote:

    > To adapt to this problem, I've been beginning to use C-
    > clamps to smash the patch onto the tube at a high
    > compression force. I haven't had any leaks with them
    > since.

    I've used over a dozen Park glueless patches, and have never
    had one fail or subsequently leak. When I bought my first
    pack, I was told to press them very firmy onto the tube for
    at least a minute - advice I've always taken.

    John
     
  7. Skokatt

    Skokatt Guest

    "ZeeExSixAre" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >> Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    >> ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once
    >> I get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch
    >> kits still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    >> alternatives?
    >
    >
    > To adapt to this problem, I've been beginning to use C-
    > clamps to smash the patch onto the tube at a high
    > compression force. I haven't had any leaks with them
    > since.
    >

    c-clamps with stick-on patches or glue-on patches? I used a
    pinch clamp with stick-on patches on the last 2 flats and
    kept those tubes as spares. Have you had good results with
    using clamps on flat repairs with stick-on patches?

    --
    - Chris Stovall - www.skokatt.com
    _____________________________

    Everyone starts out with a full bag of luck and an empty
    bag of experience. The trick is to fill one before you
    empty the other.
     
  8. Kovie wrote:

    > I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    > buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    > hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    > rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    > tube of glue.
    >
    > Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    > ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    > get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    > still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    > alternatives?
    >
    I don't know where you live, but tubes of rubber cement
    are certainly available separately in the UK, as are
    spare patches.
     
  9. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    > These work excellent. Regardless of the type you use to
    > patch (A or B) Carry the separately packaged alcohol wipes
    > (drugstore) and use one of these on the specific area
    > BEFORE you patch.
    >
    > I have had excellent adhesion with the glueless patches
    > after doing this. They take up much less room than an old
    > fashioned patch kit AND you never have to worry about your
    > glue drying up when you need it TOMORROW!!!

    Many places I ride have a dog problem. That's why I ride
    with a water bottle filled with rubbing alcohol. It
    incidentally works wonders on patches.
     
  10. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Fri, 21 May 2004 19:56:26 GMT, "Kovie" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    >buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    >hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    >rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    >tube of glue.

    I have a 3 oz. bottle of "Rubber Cement" which IIRC was
    purchased at my local grocery store. It's made by the Super
    Glue Corporation, but I had to look hard to find that on the
    label. I've had it for a few years now and judging by how
    fast it's being consumed it will probably harden before it's
    all used up.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net
    http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  11. Zeeexsixare

    Zeeexsixare Guest

    > c-clamps with stick-on patches or glue-on patches?

    stick-on

    > I used a pinch clamp with stick-on patches on the last 2
    > flats and kept those tubes as spares. Have you had good
    > results with using clamps on flat repairs with stick-on
    > patches?

    Yep... keep in mind that they were on MTB tires, which I
    keep at around 25-30 psi, sometimes 65. I dont' know about
    using a tube for longer than around 2 months because I
    inevitably get an irreparable flat before then, such as a
    leaky valve or gigantic hole.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  12. Zeeexsixare

    Zeeexsixare Guest

    > kept those tubes as spares. Have you had good results with
    > using clamps on flat repairs with stick-on patches?

    Also, I believe I have used them one, maybe twice on road
    tubes and they worked okay too at 120. They DON'T hold
    pressure if you just use your hands. Try it sometime...
    they're not expensive ;)
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  13. Kovie

    Kovie Guest

    Thanks to all for your helpful advice. I'm just going to buy
    some contact cement and salvage all my spare patches.

    --
    Kovie [email protected]

    "Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s01...
    > I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can one
    > buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    > hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    > rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another tiny
    > tube of glue.
    >
    > Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    > ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once I
    > get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch kits
    > still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    > alternatives?
    >
    > --
    > Kovie [email protected]
     
  14. Robert Masse

    Robert Masse Guest

    On Sun, 23 May 2004 19:51:25 GMT, "Kovie" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Thanks to all for your helpful advice. I'm just going to
    >buy some contact cement and salvage all my spare patches.
    >
    >--
    >Kovie [email protected]
    >
    >
    >"Kovie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]_s01...
    >> I've got half a dozen tube patch kits but no glue. Can
    >> one buy this separately, say in the adhesive section of a
    >> hardware store, or is it specific to bike tubes? I'd
    >> rather not keep accumulating kits just to get another
    >> tiny tube of glue.
    >>
    >> Also, I've used those "instant" patches and while they're
    >> ok for quick use during rides, they inevitably leak once
    >> I get home. Are the traditional, rubber and glue patch
    >> kits still the best ones, or are the newer, better
    >> alternatives?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kovie [email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >

    Don't buy Contact Cement. What you want is Rubber Cement.
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >I've used over a dozen Park glueless patches, and have
    >never had one fail or subsequently leak. When I bought my
    >first pack, I was told to press them very firmy onto the
    >tube for at least a minute - advice I've always taken.

    How old is your oldest patch? My park pactches have all
    failed right around a year after I put them on.
    --------------
    Alex
     
  16. "Alex Rodriguez" wrote:

    > How old is your oldest patch? My park pactches have all
    > failed right around a year after I put them on.

    That's a good question. I tend to throw tubes out after
    around 4 patches (as a precaution), so the oldest surviving
    patch might not be much older than a year.

    John
     
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