Tube patching



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Chere

Guest
I did my first tube patching job today. I left a little air in the tube and when I let the air out,
it was a little pouchy but a good seal. I'm deducting from this that the tube should have been flat
when the patch went on. Correct? Will this interfer with the integrity of the tube? Should I chuck
it and buy a new one or can I keep this one in the bag for emergency use? Thanks,
--
Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
B

Brian Hughes

Guest
It sounds to me like you've done it correctly. I've patched many tubes and I never bother squeezing
out every bit of air when fixing them. In fact I try to leave just a little in them so the tube is
the same relative size as it is when in the tire. I don't over-inflate when patching, but I do
over-inflate to find the hole(s) at first, then bleed out most of the air.

Concerning patches in tubes. For what it's worth, I have 4 bikes (2 bents 2 uprights). Of these 8
tires, not one single tube doesn't have a repair patch in it. In fact, most have 2 or more (I think
the worst one has 6 or
7). I live in goat head country so I would have to buy new tubes all the time if I want them all to
be "patchless". But I've found a patched tube works every bit as well as a new tube if patched
correctly. No integrity concern at all.

Brian Tailwind/V-Rex

"chere" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I did my first tube patching job today. I left a little air in the tube and when I let the air
> out, it was a little pouchy but a good seal. I'm deducting from this that the tube should have
> been flat when the patch went on. Correct? Will this interfer with the integrity of the tube?
> Should I chuck it and buy a new one or can I keep this one in the bag for emergency use? Thanks,
> --
> Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
B

Brian Hughes

Guest
It sounds to me like you've done it correctly. I've patched many tubes and I never bother squeezing
out every bit of air when fixing them. In fact I try to leave just a little in them so the tube is
the same relative size as it is when in the tire. I don't over-inflate when patching, but I do
over-inflate to find the hole(s) at first, then bleed out most of the air.

Concerning patches in tubes. For what it's worth, I have 4 bikes (2 bents 2 uprights). Of these 8
tires, not one single tube doesn't have a repair patch in it. In fact, most have 2 or more (I think
the worst one has 6 or
7). I live in goat head country so I would have to buy new tubes all the time if I want them all to
be "patchless". But I've found a patched tube works every bit as well as a new tube if patched
correctly. No integrity concern at all.

Brian Tailwind/V-Rex

"chere" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I did my first tube patching job today. I left a little air in the tube and when I let the air
> out, it was a little pouchy but a good seal. I'm deducting from this that the tube should have
> been flat when the patch went on. Correct? Will this interfer with the integrity of the tube?
> Should I chuck it and buy a new one or can I keep this one in the bag for emergency use? Thanks,
> --
> Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
C

Chere

Guest
"goat head country" - now there's a new one... I'm dying to know what "goat head" is and why it
causees flats
:)

Glad to hear a patch job will serve well as either the working tube or the spare standby.

--
Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
D

Denny Voorhees

Guest
Chere, I used to throw tubes away or use them for bungy cords if they had flatted, but with the nice
thin patching kits I've found the patch to work fine, especially on 1.25 inch and larger tubes. I
usually put about 10 pounds of air in the patched tube and let it set overnight. Right now the Giro
has no patched tubes, but all my spare tubes are patched and I've ridden many miles on patched
tubes. I carry my spare tubes in a ziplock bag, it helps protect the tube in the bike bag from
chaffing. A little talcum powder tossed in keeps them slippery for replacement. When the patch is
done correctly it's basically bonded to the tube. Denny in Sayre, PA "Bent but not Broken
www.recumbentstuff.com "brian hughes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> It sounds to me like you've done it correctly. I've patched many tubes >
Brian
> Tailwind/V-Rex
>
>
> "chere" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > I did my first tube patching job today. I left a little air in the tube and when I let the air
> > out, it was a little pouchy but a good seal. I'm deducting from this that the tube should have
> > been flat when the patch went on. Correct? Will this interfer with the integrity of the tube?
> > Should I chuck it and buy a new one or can I keep this one in the bag for emergency use? Thanks,
> > --
> > Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
> >
> >
> >
 
C

Chere

Guest
Thanks Denny That makes sense... I'm heading for the talc and baggie right now.

--
Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
B

Brian Hughes

Guest
Goat-head thorns--found out in the US Southwest. They're ruthless tough thorns that have barbs
sticking out at angles such that no matter how they fall on the ground, there will be a long sharp
barb sticking straight up ready to puncture your tire. They can and will puncture any tire no matter
how you try to flat-proof them--I use kevlar belt tires, tube liners, thorn-proof tubes, slime, etc
and still get flats from those G** D*** Goat-heads.

Brian Tailwind/V-Rex

"chere" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> "goat head country" - now there's a new one... I'm dying to know what "goat head" is and why it
> causees flats
> :)
>
> Glad to hear a patch job will serve well as either the working tube or the spare standby.
>
> --
> Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
G

Geob

Guest
> "goat head country" - now there's a new one... I'm dying to know what "goat head" is and why it
> causees flats

Don't they have goat heads in FL? These are nasty lil sticker/burr thingees. Goats have curved
horns, these have two straight 'horns' sticking out of the bur in such a way as to look for all the
world like a lil goat head. 1/4 - 1/2 inch from chin to end of 'horns'. If you step on one of these
barefoot, and send those spikes all the way in it kinda gets your attention. The 'horn' (thorn,
spike) tapers from base to point yielding a structure that maintains its integrity throughout many
'insertions'. So if the dog brings one in on to a hard floor and you are padding about blurry-eyed
getting the mornings 1st cup... well, you see where I'm going.

This is one of the critters that has increased its range due to mankind. Sorta like the Russian
Thistle (tumble weed), Black Widows, White Tailed Kites (bird of prey). The bicycle and automobile
tire spreads these lil monsters everywhere across the country. I am surprised they aren't where you
are. They are in TX, CA, etc. Maybe we should take a poll, see where they are.

Consider yourself blessed by not knowing about them.
 
C

Chere

Guest
Hmmmmm.... could be they're the things my kids (after stepping on them in bare feet) named
"Fu*kleberries".

We probably have Goat Heads in FL... seems like a lot of the vegetation there either has a thorn
or a burr on it. I'm not too familiar with FL plants - gave up gardening there after discovering
FIRE ANTS.

--
Chere ~ GRR Sanibel, FL / Cumberland, MD
 
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