Tube - washer on valve stem

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by noonievut, Jun 28, 2009.

  1. noonievut

    noonievut New Member

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    Is it important to use the washer on the valve stem? I just got cxp33's and because the top of the rim is more aero than my previous rim, I notice that the washer doesn't fit as good as it did on my older rims. Any reason why I should leave this on? Thanks.
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Nope. None. Leave it off.
     
  3. Peter@vecchios

    Peter@vecchios New Member

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    First, baby powder the tube. Makes it last longer and easier to install. Tubes move around inside of a tire when riding. If you don't powder or do use the nut, it can either stick to the inside of the tire causing a flat or tear the valve if you use the nut.

    Powder and don't use the nut.
     
  4. Camilo

    Camilo New Member

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    I'm not familiar with a valve stem washer. What is it?
     
  5. waldowales

    waldowales New Member

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    Automatic device that saves you the trouble of washing your stem by hand.
     
  6. camdyson

    camdyson New Member

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    Ha ha! I think they are referring to the round threaded stem nut...

    My mechanic advised against the powder "trick" when I brought up that I use it on lightweight tubes - I think from memory the reason was that some powders can attack the tube material? May be arguing one old wives' tale against another here, so I won't pass judgement...

    Cam
     
  7. Peter@vecchios

    Peter@vecchios New Member

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    If it's safe for a baby's but, it isn't going to hurt a latex tube.
     
  8. lspeedguy

    lspeedguy New Member

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    This is an old post that I stumbled on - I like having that round washer on the tube valve which I snug down on the rim - I like short valves and ,if that washer is missing, when I attempt to pump a new tube with my floor pump the valve will go down into the rim making it tough for the pump nozzle to get a good grip on the valve .

    Having that washer there prevents this from happening and it's the only reason I keep it on .
     
  9. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    From memory - the older style talcum powder often had asbestos in it. The new baby talc does not. So use it without any worries and it does allow the tube to squirm into shape inside the tire on initial inflation.
     
  10. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Your mechanic is wrong, get another mechanic. I've used baby or talc powder for years on both latex and butyl tubes and never had an issue with rotting tubes, in fact if you don't use it the tube will stick to the tire and could tear it when you go to remove the tube. I think most people use talc on their tubes and have been doing so for many many years.
     
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  11. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yup. Use powder. Less twisting and easier seating of the tube during installation and less friction between the tire and tube when riding.

    Like Froze, I've used talcum powder for decades with no issues.
     
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