Tubeless repair

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jon Keech, Jul 28, 2003.

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  1. Jon Keech

    Jon Keech Guest

    Howdy,

    I have a pair of Michelin Jet S tubeless tires and the rear one has been damaged. They're stellar in
    anything dry and I would like to rescue it from the garbage.

    During a race last weekend I somehow managed to slash the rear tire and it is cut clean through the
    casing. I patched the hole with a regular patch (as Michelin was clever enough to use a butyl rubber
    coating on the inside) but the slash is large enough that the patch doesn't quite cut it. This
    results in a bubble forming through the slash when I reinflate them. I haven't tried to ride on them
    as I fear they would just blow out.

    Is it possible for me to sew up the slash and then patch over it on the inside? Any suggestions
    would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks

    Jon
     
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  2. Fakhina Sohl

    Fakhina Sohl Guest

    "Jon Keech" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > During a race last weekend I somehow managed to slash the rear tire and it is cut clean through
    > the casing. Is it possible for me to sew up the slash and then patch over it on the inside? Any
    > suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    I've done this with conventional tubed MTB tyres, and it's worked successfully - I see no reason why
    it wouldn't work for you with tubeless.

    The tyre needs structure and sealing. As long as you can provide both, you're set.

    I sewed the tyre with synthetic thread, then finished it with a smear of AquaSeal or ShoeGoo or
    similar over the sewn section. I had a tube to seal the air in the tyre for me - you'll have to be
    clever with a patch over your sew-up repair.

    My biggest problem was that the sewn section of tyre was a little thicker than the rest, and it was
    close to my rim brake pads (it was actually a slipped brake pad that cut the tyre) so it was
    difficult to avoid brake rubbing.

    If you have tubeless wheels I'll assume you're a techno-weenie ;-) so you probably have disc brakes
    - so my rim-brake concerns won't bother you.

    fs
     
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