Tubeless Tires

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by T_blood, Apr 26, 2003.

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  1. T_blood

    T_blood Guest

    Here is a stupid question....the new bike I have came with tubeless tires. After giving it some
    thought I am curious how I will repair a flat? What happens when I pick up a thorn or such while
    out? Before I just quickly replaced the tube, but now???
     
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  2. Nelson Binch

    Nelson Binch Guest

    "T_Blood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | Here is a stupid question....the new bike I have came with tubeless tires. After giving it some
    | thought I am curious how I will repair a flat? What happens when I pick up a thorn or such while
    | out? Before I just quickly replaced the tube, but now???

    Carry a glue type patch kit and an inner tube. Yes, I know that carrying a tube defeats the "Less
    weight with no tubes" philosophy, but it beats walking.

    The first couple years that Gary Fisher bikes had tubeless systems, they came with tubes (sometimes
    mounted, sometimes in the parts bag. Their system used a special rimstrip design to seal with the
    bead, while UST uses an undrilled rim bed - I guess Bontrager (the maker of the Fisher version)
    didn't trust their system that much at first.

    One thing I have been told by some reps (I still run tubes, so I've never put this to the test) is
    that you can leave a thorn *in the tire* and it won't lose air as fast as a tube will.

    ---
    __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    http://intergalax.com

    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.476 / Virus Database: 273 -
    Release Date: 4/24/2003
     
  3. Todd B

    Todd B Guest

    I have founs the best way to repair a tubeless tube while riding is.....with a tube. "Nelson Binch"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "T_Blood" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > | Here is a stupid question....the new bike I have came with tubeless tires. After giving it some
    > | thought I am curious how I will repair a flat? What happens when I pick up a thorn or such while
    > | out? Before I just quickly replaced the tube, but now???
    >
    > Carry a glue type patch kit and an inner tube. Yes, I know that carrying
    a
    > tube defeats the "Less weight with no tubes" philosophy, but it beats walking.
    >
    > The first couple years that Gary Fisher bikes had tubeless systems, they came with tubes
    > (sometimes mounted, sometimes in the parts bag. Their system used a special rimstrip design to
    > seal with the bead, while UST
    uses
    > an undrilled rim bed - I guess Bontrager (the maker of the Fisher version) didn't trust their
    > system that much at first.
    >
    > One thing I have been told by some reps (I still run tubes, so I've never put this to the test) is
    > that you can leave a thorn *in the tire* and it won't lose air as fast as a tube will.
    >
    >
    > ---
    > __o _`\(,_ Cycling is life, (_)/ (_) all the rest, just details. Nelson Binch =^o.o^=
    > http://intergalax.com
    >
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com). Version: 6.0.476 / Virus Database: 273
    > - Release Date: 4/24/2003
     
  4. John Harlow

    John Harlow Guest

    > Here is a stupid question....the new bike I have came with tubeless tires. After giving it some
    > thought I am curious how I will repair a flat? What happens when I pick up a thorn or such while
    > out? Before I just quickly replaced the tube, but now???

    A tube can work in a pinch (pun intended) - but Slime will patch most thorn type punctures without
    you even knowing you have one. Deflate them and squirt a bit in there.

    The good news is tubeless are so reliable you'll rarely if ever have tire problems anymore.
     
  5. Jan Sacharuk

    Jan Sacharuk Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, John Harlow wrote:

    > The good news is tubeless are so reliable you'll rarely if ever have tire problems anymore.

    Here's something I've been wondering: do tubeless tyres come in sizes big enough for so-called
    'free-ride' bikes, and are they just as reliable?

    I'm running 2.4s on my VPS-3, and I don't recall ever seeing a tubeless tyre that big. And even if I
    COULD get them that big, would it be practical to run them? All of my flats are almost certainly
    going to be pinch related. Mavic doesn't make a downhill UST wheelset, does it?

    I'm not exactly burning to jump on this bandwagon, but if it works better, it works better, and I'm
    all for that.

    JS

    --
    ========================= [email protected] ========================
    Jan Sacharuk Member in Good Standing of The Discordian Solidarity Turn on viewing of the X-Geek-Code
    header to see my Geek Code
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    "This is a dumb world. In my world, there are people in chains,
    and we can ride them like ponies." - Evil Willow, BtVS
     
  6. Jan Sacharuk wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, John Harlow wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The good news is tubeless are so reliable you'll rarely if ever have tire problems anymore.
    >
    >
    > Here's something I've been wondering: do tubeless tyres come in sizes big enough for so-called
    > 'free-ride' bikes, and are they just as reliable?
    >
    > I'm running 2.4s on my VPS-3, and I don't recall ever seeing a tubeless tyre that big. And even if
    > I COULD get them that big, would it be practical to run them? All of my flats are almost certainly
    > going to be pinch related. Mavic doesn't make a downhill UST wheelset, does it?
    >
    > I'm not exactly burning to jump on this bandwagon, but if it works better, it works better, and
    > I'm all for that.
    >
    > JS
    >

    There are a few 2.3 tires out there. I have found that the 2.0 pythons hook up just as well (if not
    better) than the 2.4s I had on the rat ride. The ability to run lower pressure gives you a similar
    amount of contact patch.

    To the original poster. Carry a spare tube.

    A

    --
    My hands are full of thorns but I can't quit groping for the rose.
     
  7. Tk

    Tk Guest

  8. Nate

    Nate Guest

    [email protected] (T_Blood) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Here is a stupid question....the new bike I have came with tubeless tires. After giving it some
    > thought I am curious how I will repair a flat? What happens when I pick up a thorn or such while
    > out? Before I just quickly replaced the tube, but now???

    In my tubeless experience (3 sets of tires over past year) I always have carried a patch kit (for
    patching the tire) and an extra tube. One of my tires is *unpatchable* so after trying to patch it
    for six hours (over many occasions) I used tubeless slime, and it works great. I have several sets
    of tires, tubed and t-less, but i really like the ride quality and performance of the tubeless
    better. Don't believe the "no mo' pinch flat" hype. Certain types may still pinch flat if the
    pressure is too low. Nate
     
  9. > hours (over many occasions) I used tubeless slime, and it works great. I have several sets of
    > tires, tubed and t-less, but i really

    Hey, is this some specific, just for bicycle tubeless tires slime?-) Or will anything work, like the
    stuff they put in motorcycle tires?

    Juho
     
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