tubes tubes tubes... (not for tubeless :D )

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by astroluc, Aug 11, 2005.

  1. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    So... I got a flat the other day, and I switched out my tube (as I do when this happens) and my new tube just does not seem to hold the pressure... When I fill up the tire w/ my floor pump (w/ psi guage), after I remove the nozzle from the valve, the tire still feels soft although I filled it to required psi. So, I reattached the nozzle to the valve and it showed 40-50 lbs under required pressure... So I repeated this seveal times to see if the results were the same/similar; they were!

    Now, I have replaced several tubes in my time, and this is the first time this has happened. My conclusion is that this tube I have used is cheap; and more akin to a balloon than a cycling tire innertube.

    The point of this post is this; I would like your thoughts about my situation (whether you agree or not), and what you would suggest as a consistantly good brand of tubes (and where to purchase). Thank you.
     
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  2. RBS

    RBS New Member

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    perhaps the problem is not with the tube. sometimes whatever pierced the tire is still stuck in the tire ready to puncture any new tube. i run my fingers around the inside perimeter after a flat too make sure that nothing is there. having said that you also may have a bad tube (or batch of tubes). i've tried all the brands - cheap and expensive and they all seem to work the same for me. some just won't hold air no matter what. just chuck 'em and ride on.

    later

    bob



     
  3. John M

    John M New Member

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    I apologize if this seems too basic and I don't mean to insult one's intelligence, but I don't know your experience level.
    There are a few possibilities.
    1. The tube is defective and had a leak from the start.
    2. The reason for the first flat is still present. A sharp object (thorn, glass, shard of metal, etc...) could still be wedged into the tire and may have punctured the new tube when you brought it up to pressure the first time. Always carefully inspect the tire before installing the new tube to ensure that it is clear of debris.
    3. The tube could have been pinched between the tire and rim during installation and was punctured during inflation (akin to a "snakebite" puncture). Always check to be sure that the tire is seated properly all around the rim prior to inflation.

    I think that you are probably correct in that the tube was bad to start with. Most bike shop brands of tubes are generally OK for day to day training use. Yes, you may find a bad one occasionally. From my shop mechanic days, I found that a common spot for defects (fortunately rare in the first place) is where the valve stem joins the tube.

    That being said, if you want specific brands, I have had good reliability with Continental and Michelin tubes. Vittoria and Vredestein are also good. Expect to pay $5-8 for top quality butyl tubes in a LBS, less online.
     
  4. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    thank you for your responses so far; I will triple check to see if there is anything which maybe pinching/puncturing the new tube...

    ...here is some more info: the Tube seems to be holding air (no apparant leak) just not pressure. I fill it to the the proper psi and it still seems soft after removing the pump nozzle. As I mentioned I have replaced/used many tubes and never had this specific problem.

    I may just end up chucking this tube and washing my hands of it


    I am what you would call an experienced noob. Rode extensively in the early 90s; completely lost touch with riding for nigh on a decade, and have jumped back in headfirst this year! (turning 30 can do that.)
     
  5. John M

    John M New Member

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    Chuck that tube. You have already spent more value in time than the cost of a new tube. There may be a small defect that does not leak when the tube is filled with air outside of the tire because you only generate a few PSI. But when you subject it to 100+ PSI, it then leaks.
     
  6. astroluc

    astroluc New Member

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    gotcha'... DONE
     
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