Tubie or Not Tubie, That Is the Question?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Sheldon Brown, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. Sorry to be a language curmudgeon, but I gotta say I'm appalled to see
    people I respect using the infantile term "tubie" in speaking of tubular
    tires. "Tubulars," "sew-ups," even "tubs," OK, but "tubies" is beyond
    the pale! Have some pride, people!

    Sheldon "Curmudging" Brown
    +-----------------------------------------+
    | Man invented language to satisfy his |
    | deep need to complain. -- Lily Tomlin |
    +-----------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
    Tags:


  2. On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 16:35:25 -0500, Sheldon Brown
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Sorry to be a language curmudgeon, but I gotta say I'm appalled to see
    >people I respect using the infantile term "tubie" in speaking of tubular
    >tires. "Tubulars," "sew-ups," even "tubs," OK, but "tubies" is beyond
    >the pale! Have some pride, people!
    >
    >Sheldon "Curmudging" Brown
    >+-----------------------------------------+
    >| Man invented language to satisfy his |
    >| deep need to complain. -- Lily Tomlin |
    >+-----------------------------------------+
    > Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    > Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    > http://harriscyclery.com
    > Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    >http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com


    Dear Sheldon,

    A further spelling quibble . . .

    I can tell how to pronounce "tubies" because that's how the
    diminuitive -ies plural of "tube" is formed with a
    typewriter. (I doubt that it's supposed to be pronounced as
    the plural "tubbies" is pronounced when speaking of more
    than one tubby person.)

    But at first glance the popular "tubs" looks if it ought to
    be pronounced "tuhbs" instead of "toobs"--it looks exactly
    like the sort of tubs or vats used in washing.

    But I'm not sure which pronunciation is preferred. I think
    that people who write "tubs" want us to say "toobs" as a
    shortened form of "tubulars", but are afraid to write
    "tubes" because it might be confused with inner tubes and
    fear that "toobs" would look silly.

    I fling this question out in order to--well, as has been
    previously discussed:

    " . . . seamen have a custom when they meet a Whale to fling
    him out an empty Tub, by way of amusement, to divert him
    from laying violent hands upon the Ship."

    Off now to find the missing "r" in Colonel.

    Jonathan Swift
     
  3. I griped:

    >>Sorry to be a language curmudgeon, but I gotta say I'm appalled to see
    >>people I respect using the infantile term "tubie" in speaking of tubular
    >>tires. "Tubulars," "sew-ups," even "tubs," OK, but "tubies" is beyond
    >>the pale! Have some pride, people!


    Carl Fogel wrote:

    > But at first glance the popular "tubs" looks if it ought to
    > be pronounced "tuhbs" instead of "toobs"--it looks exactly
    > like the sort of tubs or vats used in washing.
    >
    > But I'm not sure which pronunciation is preferred. I think
    > that people who write "tubs" want us to say "toobs" as a
    > shortened form of "tubulars", but are afraid to write
    > "tubes" because it might be confused with inner tubes and
    > fear that "toobs" would look silly.


    I don't think so. When I see "tubs" in this context, I hear one of
    those wonderful North-of-England "u"s, which I can't really compare to
    any 'Merican phoneme.

    I don't know of any American who says "tubs." That's strictly British
    usage.

    Sheldon "Imagine John Lennon" Brown
    +---------------------------------------------------+
    | Time shouldn't just pass; things should happen. |
    | --Harry Turtledove |
    +---------------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. >>>
    But I'm not sure which pronunciation is preferred.
    <<<

    Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.

    That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    Claud Butler.

    Kind regards.

    Lewis.

    ********
     
  5. Diablo Scott

    Diablo Scott Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    > 50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    >
    > That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    > Claud Butler.
    >
    > Kind regards.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > ********
    >


    Yeah Limey, but when you say "bugs" with your accent it probably rhymes
    with "boogs" in mine.


    --
    My bike blog:
    http://diabloscott.blogspot.com/
     
  6. On 7 Feb 2005 14:27:41 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >>>>

    >But I'm not sure which pronunciation is preferred.
    ><<<
    >
    >Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    >50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    >
    >That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    >Claud Butler.
    >
    >Kind regards.
    >
    >Lewis.
    >
    >********


    Dear Lewis,

    Aha! I was wrong--"tuhbs" is the pronunciation.

    Some of you ride in clubs on tubs to pubs as long as neither
    brake rubs, fearing no snubs from any clincher rider who
    pinch-flats amidst the shrubs when he stubs the toes of his
    hubs?

    A friend confessed yesterday that he thought that the
    British "whinge" was just a dyslexic or Chaucerian
    mis-spelling of "whigne" for "whine" until a kindly
    expatriate corrected his pronunciation.

    Carl Fogel
     
  7. On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 14:40:33 -0800, Diablo Scott
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    >> 50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    >>
    >> That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    >> Claud Butler.
    >>
    >> Kind regards.
    >>
    >> Lewis.
    >>
    >> ********
    >>

    >
    >Yeah Limey, but when you say "bugs" with your accent it probably rhymes
    >with "boogs" in mine.


    Dear Diablo,

    Oh, dear, you may be right!

    That might be the kewelest Clood Bootler bahcycle!

    It's hard for me to remember that not everyone is blessed
    with the nasal Mid-Western twang whose pure roots are
    watered in the well of English undefiled that feeds the
    Arkansas, whose terminal -s- is a -w-, where hand towels are
    called warsh rags to rhyme with marsh hags and the
    Purgatoire River is known as the Picketwire.

    Carl Fogel
     
  8. Ted

    Ted Guest


    > Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    > 50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    >
    > That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    > Claud Butler.
    >
    > Kind regards.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > ********


    How on earth does a "b" rhyme with a "g", even in England?

    --
    Ted Bennett
    Portland, OR
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 15:45:08 -0700, [email protected] may have
    said:

    >A friend confessed yesterday that he thought that the
    >British "whinge" was just a dyslexic or Chaucerian
    >mis-spelling of "whigne" for "whine" until a kindly
    >expatriate corrected his pronunciation.


    The pronunciation of things in English is not always intuitive...

    http://www.dreadgazebo.com/eric.html

    The Eric of the story was neither the first nor the last person to be
    under the misapprehension that "gazebo" was pronounced "gaze bow".

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  10. On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 01:40:48 GMT, Ted
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >> Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a teenager in the
    >> 50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    >>
    >> That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a Campy equipped
    >> Claud Butler.
    >>
    >> Kind regards.
    >>
    >> Lewis.
    >>
    >> ********

    >
    >How on earth does a "b" rhyme with a "g", even in England?


    Dear Ted,

    Watch my smoke!

    I want a hero: an uncommon want,
    When every year and month sends forth a new one,
    Till, after cloying the gazettes with cant,
    The age discovers he is not the true one;
    Of such as these I should not care to vaunt,
    I'll therefore take our ancient friend Don Juan . . .

    Could never make a memory so fine as
    That which adorn'd the brain of Donna Inez. . .

    And then, by the advice of some old ladies,
    She sent her son to be shipp'd off from Cadiz. . .

    Let not a monument give you or me hopes,
    Since not a pinch of dust remains of Cheops . . .

    Let's see . . .

    Fogel, mogul, ogle, boggle, hornswoggle . . .

    Nope, that one's too tough for me--I can't even rhyme
    Manfred or Sardanapaulus.

    George Byron
     
  11. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 01:40:48 GMT, Ted
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >> Hi, Carl, I was born and raised in England and, as a

    teenager in the
    > >> 50's, we pronounced it to rhyme with 'bugs'.
    > >>
    > >> That was back in the days when the 'coolest' bike was a

    Campy equipped
    > >> Claud Butler.
    > >>
    > >> Kind regards.
    > >>
    > >> Lewis.
    > >>
    > >> ********

    > >
    > >How on earth does a "b" rhyme with a "g", even in England?

    >
    > Dear Ted,
    >
    > Watch my smoke!
    >
    > I want a hero: an uncommon want,
    > When every year and month sends forth a new one,
    > Till, after cloying the gazettes with cant,
    > The age discovers he is not the true one;
    > Of such as these I should not care to vaunt,
    > I'll therefore take our ancient friend Don Juan . . .
    >
    > Could never make a memory so fine as
    > That which adorn'd the brain of Donna Inez. . .
    >
    > And then, by the advice of some old ladies,
    > She sent her son to be shipp'd off from Cadiz. . .
    >
    > Let not a monument give you or me hopes,
    > Since not a pinch of dust remains of Cheops . . .
    >
    > Let's see . . .
    >
    > Fogel, mogul, ogle, boggle, hornswoggle . . .
    >
    > Nope, that one's too tough for me--I can't even rhyme
    > Manfred or Sardanapaulus.
    >
    > George Byron


    Don't listen to those folks from Arkansas, Ted. If we were as
    confused as them, we would have named our fair state
    Arwashington. At least we had the good sense to come up with
    something original. -- Jay Beattie.
     
  12. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    I have long held the opinion that more often than not, "poetry" is
    just "pottery" misspelled.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  13. I agree! Let's just call them singles, as they're supposed to be :p

    Regards,

    Suzy (ocker)
     
  14. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 01:40:48 GMT, Ted


    > Let's see . . .
    >
    > Fogel, mogul, ogle, boggle, hornswoggle . . .
    >
    > Nope, that one's too tough for me--I can't even rhyme
    > Manfred or Sardanapaulus.
    >
    > George Byron


    There once was rim skin named Tubie
    Who's name did confuse Dave the nubie
    ....


    Dave
     
  15. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > Sorry to be a language curmudgeon, but I gotta say I'm appalled to see
    > people I respect using the infantile term "tubie" in speaking of tubular
    > tires. "Tubulars," "sew-ups," even "tubs," OK, but "tubies" is beyond
    > the pale! Have some pride, people!
    >
    > Sheldon "Curmudging" Brown


    I could always revert to the slang of the person who instructed me in
    the fine art of tubular repair, and refer to "blow ups" (rhymes with
    "sew ups").

    Mark Janeba
     
  16. Rob Wade

    Rob Wade Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > It's hard for me to remember that not everyone is blessed
    > with the nasal Mid-Western twang whose pure roots are
    > watered in the well of English undefiled that feeds the
    > Arkansas, whose terminal -s- is a -w-, where hand towels are
    > called warsh rags to rhyme with marsh hags and the
    > Purgatoire River is known as the Picketwire.


    If you evah make your way to Rhode Island....

    If anyone ever asks "djeetyet?"

    Be sure to ask for a bowl or cup of chowdah with your gaggahs.

    You might even want to try a grindah.

    Don'tchoo evah even try smot remahks either.

    In Woonsocket, not only do you "pahk the cah", but you do it "side by
    each wit the uddahs"

    In Woonsocket, a Dynamite is a kind of grindah.

    The best place for food is "The Hill"

    "I'm goin' down to the spa" doesn't mean you're going to get a workout
    or facial.

    And remember, there are 3 kinds of clams. Quahogs, Steamers, and Little
    Necks. There's a 4'th kind, called Cherry Stones (baby quahogs), but
    they're illegal. If you're snooty and blue blood, Quahogs are Ko-hogs.
    If you're not, it's kwa-hogs.

    And no, we don't have accents here. Everyone else does.

    --
    BMO
     
  17. Boyle M. Owl

    Boyle M. Owl Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > It's hard for me to remember that not everyone is blessed
    > with the nasal Mid-Western twang whose pure roots are
    > watered in the well of English undefiled that feeds the
    > Arkansas, whose terminal -s- is a -w-, where hand towels are
    > called warsh rags to rhyme with marsh hags and the
    > Purgatoire River is known as the Picketwire.



    If you evah make your way to Rhode Island....

    If anyone ever asks "djeetyet?"

    Be sure to ask for a bowl or cup of chowdah with your gaggahs.

    You might even want to try a grindah.

    Don'tchoo evah even try smot remahks either.

    In Woonsocket, not only do you "pahk the cah", but you do it "side by
    each wit the uddahs"

    In Woonsocket, a Dynamite is a kind of grindah.

    The best place for food is "The Hill"

    "I'm goin' down to the spa" doesn't mean you're going to get a workout
    or facial.

    And remember, there are 3 kinds of clams. Quahogs, Steamers, and Little
    Necks. There's a 4'th kind, called Cherry Stones (baby quahogs), but
    they're illegal. If you're snooty and blue blood, Quahogs are Ko-hogs.
    If you're not, it's kwa-hogs.

    And no, we don't have accents here. Everyone else does.

    --
    BMO
     
  18. On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 01:39:22 -0500, "Boyle M. Owl"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > It's hard for me to remember that not everyone is blessed
    > > with the nasal Mid-Western twang whose pure roots are
    > > watered in the well of English undefiled that feeds the
    > > Arkansas, whose terminal -s- is a -w-, where hand towels are
    > > called warsh rags to rhyme with marsh hags and the
    > > Purgatoire River is known as the Picketwire.

    >
    >
    >If you evah make your way to Rhode Island....
    >
    >If anyone ever asks "djeetyet?"
    >
    >Be sure to ask for a bowl or cup of chowdah with your gaggahs.
    >
    >You might even want to try a grindah.
    >
    >Don'tchoo evah even try smot remahks either.
    >
    >In Woonsocket, not only do you "pahk the cah", but you do it "side by
    >each wit the uddahs"
    >
    >In Woonsocket, a Dynamite is a kind of grindah.
    >
    >The best place for food is "The Hill"
    >
    >"I'm goin' down to the spa" doesn't mean you're going to get a workout
    >or facial.
    >
    >And remember, there are 3 kinds of clams. Quahogs, Steamers, and Little
    >Necks. There's a 4'th kind, called Cherry Stones (baby quahogs), but
    >they're illegal. If you're snooty and blue blood, Quahogs are Ko-hogs.
    > If you're not, it's kwa-hogs.
    >
    >And no, we don't have accents here. Everyone else does.


    Dear Ro--er, Boyle,

    Interestingly, your two replies indicate that in your neck
    of the woods "Rob Wade" is pronounced "Boyle M. Owl," just
    as "Werehatrack" requires a peculiar rustling intonation
    south of Ault, Oklahoma.

    Carl Fogel
     
  19. On Mon, 07 Feb 2005 20:27:57 -0600, Werehatrack
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have long held the opinion that more often than not, "poetry" is
    >just "pottery" misspelled.


    Dear Werehatrack,

    None answer'd this; but after Silence spake
    A Vessel of a more ungainly Make:
    "They sneer at me for leaning all awry;
    "What! did the Hand then of the Potter shake!"

    It's a shame that Pope didn't write those lines.

    E. Fitzgerald
     
  20. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > Sorry to be a language curmudgeon, but I gotta say I'm appalled to see
    > people I respect using the infantile term "tubie" in speaking of tubular
    > tires. "Tubulars," "sew-ups," even "tubs," OK, but "tubies" is beyond
    > the pale! Have some pride, people!
    >
    > Sheldon "Curmudging" Brown


    A hearty second to that.

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
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