Tubular Base tape replacement

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Emory, Jun 13, 2003.

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  1. Emory

    Emory Guest

    Question All, I have a set of tubular tire that when they were removed from the wheels the base tape
    was pulled off the tire in one intance and in the other the base tape was torn. I would like to use
    these tires again but am unclear how to fix them. Putting new base tape on seems the best solutionn
    but where to get it and what to glue it on with. One person told me just to skip the base tape (that
    it was really just to protect the threads so that you could repair the tire) this solution seems
    questionable.

    Any suggestions or opions welcome.

    Yours Emory Ball
     
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  2. emory-<< I have a set of tubular tire that when they were removed from the wheels the base tape was
    pulled off the tire in one intance and in the other the base tape was torn. I would like to use
    these tires again but am unclear how to fix them. Putting new base tape on seems the best solutionn
    but where to get it and what to glue it on with.

    Send it to 'Tire Alert', they can replace the base tape correctly.

    << One person told me just to skip the base tape (that it was really just to protect the threads so
    that you could repair the tire) this solution seems questionable.

    Yep, those pesky threads...yes, ignore this advice.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. Jpinkowish

    Jpinkowish Guest

    >Send it to 'Tire Alert', they can replace the base tape correctly.

    Hi Peter, I don't know about your experience w/Tire Alert, but mine was disappointing.

    I sent them 2 Conti Competitions and TA returned them witha very thin tape applied. Additionally,
    the adhesive was all over the sidewalls in many spots and threads from the tape werecoming off
    the edges.

    A tire that once fit very snugly to the rim now fit pretty loosely. When I called them, they just
    told me to make sure that I firmly glued the tire. They never offered an explanation for the sloppy
    workmanship.

    When I removed one of the TA-repaired tires from a rim, the entire TA base tape stayed on the rim.
    The adhesive that TA uses never really fully cures.

    End of tire.

    For $20/tire, which includes ripping open the tubbie, replacing the tube with a standard butyl tube,
    restitching the tire, and return postage paid, there isn't much room for profit. I would much rather
    pay the extra $$ for them to either just open the tire and mend the original tube, or use factory
    quality base tape.

    Comments from others?

    Jan Pinkowish Bristol, CT
     
  4. Bw

    Bw Guest

    My experience with TA was the opposite, very good repair job. I can't speak for all of their work
    but I wouldn't hesitiate to send my highest quality tires with simple punctures to them again.

    Brook

    In article <[email protected]>, Jpinkowish <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Send it to 'Tire Alert', they can replace the base tape correctly.
    >
    > Hi Peter, I don't know about your experience w/Tire Alert, but mine was disappointing.
    >
    > I sent them 2 Conti Competitions and TA returned them witha very thin tape applied. Additionally,
    > the adhesive was all over the sidewalls in many spots and threads from the tape werecoming off
    > the edges.
    >
    > A tire that once fit very snugly to the rim now fit pretty loosely. When I called them, they just
    > told me to make sure that I firmly glued the tire. They never offered an explanation for the
    > sloppy workmanship.
    >
    > When I removed one of the TA-repaired tires from a rim, the entire TA base tape stayed on the rim.
    > The adhesive that TA uses never really fully cures.
    >
    > End of tire.
    >
    > For $20/tire, which includes ripping open the tubbie, replacing the tube with a standard butyl
    > tube, restitching the tire, and return postage paid, there isn't much room for profit. I would
    > much rather pay the extra $$ for them to either just open the tire and mend the original tube, or
    > use factory quality base tape.
    >
    > Comments from others?
    >
    > Jan Pinkowish Bristol, CT
     
  5. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Emory Ball writes:

    > I have a set of tubular tire that when they were removed from the wheels the base tape was pulled
    > off the tire in one intance and in the other the base tape was torn. I would like to use these
    > tires again but am unclear how to fix them. Putting new base tape on seems the best solutionn but
    > where to get it and what to glue it on with. One person told me just to skip the base tape (that
    > it was really just to protect the threads so that you could repair the tire) this solution seems
    > questionable.

    If you are going to ride tubular tires, today even more than when they were the mainstream, you
    should become proficient in their repair. This is both for cost and reliability reasons, the second
    may be more important than the first. If your base tapes are not worn through, even if they have
    tears in them, can be glued back in place with latex rubber emulsion.

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  6. Emory

    Emory Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<20030613091220.21463.00000491[email protected]>...
    > emory-<< I have a set of tubular tire that when they were removed from the wheels the base tape
    > was pulled off the tire in one intance and in the other the base tape was torn. I would like to
    > use these tires again but am unclear how to fix them. Putting new base tape on seems the best
    > solutionn but where to get it and what to glue it on with.
    >
    > Send it to 'Tire Alert', they can replace the base tape correctly.
    >
    >
    > << One person told me just to skip the base tape (that it was really just to protect the threads
    > so that you could repair the tire) this solution seems questionable.
    >
    > Yep, those pesky threads...yes, ignore this advice.
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    Thanks that was the trick and pretty cheap too. Emory
     
  7. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Jan Pinkowish writes:

    >> Send it to 'Tire Alert', they can replace the base tape correctly.

    > I don't know about your experience w/Tire Alert, but mine was disappointing. I sent them 2 Conti
    > Competitions and TA returned them with a very thin tape applied. Additionally, the adhesive was
    > all over the sidewalls in many spots and threads from the tape were coming off the edges.

    > A tire that once fit very snugly to the rim now fit pretty loosely. When I called them, they just
    > told me to make sure that I firmly glued the tire. They never offered an explanation for the
    > sloppy workmanship.

    > When I removed one of the TA-repaired tires from a rim, the entire TA base tape stayed on the rim.
    > The adhesive that TA uses never really fully cures.

    > End of tire.

    > For $20/tire, which includes ripping open the tubbie, replacing the tube with a standard butyl
    > tube, re-stitching the tire, and return postage paid, there isn't much room for profit. I would
    > much rather pay the extra $$ for them to either just open the tire and mend the original tube, or
    > use factory quality base tape.

    Replacing a tube does not require opening the entire seam. How to do this in the privacy f your own
    home is explained in the FAQ:

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html

    As I said, for reliability reasons, you should repair your own tubular tires. By the way, if you
    regularly ride tubulars, there will be tires that are slashed or otherwise irreparable and from
    these, tubes and base tapes can be salvaged for repairs.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  8. On Fri, 13 Jun 2003 15:46:27 +0000, Jpinkowish wrote:

    > When I removed one of the TA-repaired tires from a rim, the entire TA base tape stayed on the rim.
    > The adhesive that TA uses never really fully cures.

    That is nonsense. What did they use to glue the tape on?

    In all my years of repairng tubular tires (thankfully behind me), I never had to replace a base
    tape. The tape outlasts the rest of the tire. I also never replaced a tube -- well, I did throw away
    the tire if the valve went, though.

    > For $20/tire, which includes ripping open the tubbie, replacing the tube with a standard butyl
    > tube, restitching the tire, and return postage paid, there isn't much room for profit.

    Why on Earth replace the tube? Have they never heard of patches? Have they never thought that
    re-stitching the whole casing weakens it (from occasional damge done to the cords by the needle)?
    And they replace your super-light latex tube with a $2 butyl tube. How nice.

    > I would much rather pay the extra $$ for them to either just open the tire and mend the original
    >tube, or use factory quality base tape.
    >
    > Comments from others?

    If you are going to bother with tubulars, then own the entire experience, including flat repair. If
    you can't be bothered, do what the rest of us do; get clinchers. But this is nonsense. Paying
    someone to repair a tire is one thing, paying good money for base tape that is improperly glued and
    unnecessary replacement of the tube is another.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | It is a scientifically proven fact that a mid life crisis can _`\(,_ | only be cured by
    something racy and Italian. Bianchis and (_)/ (_) | Colnagos are a lot cheaper than Maserattis
    and Ferraris. -- Glenn Davies
     
  9. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    David L. Johnson writes:

    >> When I removed one of the TA-repaired tires from a rim, the entire TA base tape stayed on the
    >> rim. The adhesive that TA uses never really fully cures.

    > That is nonsense. What did they use to glue the tape on?

    I concur. Unless someone unskilled in the art did the job, the base tape was most likely secured
    with latex solution. Of course with cheap labor it is always possible that some jerk used rubber
    patching solution, who knows.

    > In all my years of repairing tubular tires (thankfully behind me), I never had to replace a base
    > tape. The tape outlasts the rest of the tire. I also never replaced a tube -- well, I did throw
    > away the tire if the valve went, though.

    That's probably because you didn't descend "hot rim" braking mountains enough. My base tapes barely
    lasted the life of the tire and on occasion, wore through. That's what the two dark grey strips are
    on the tape, aluminum oxide.

    >> For $20/tire, which includes ripping open the tubbie, replacing the tube with a standard butyl
    >> tube, re-stitching the tire, and return postage paid, there isn't much room for profit.

    > Why on Earth replace the tube? Have they never heard of patches? Have they never thought that
    > re-stitching the whole casing weakens it (from occasional damage done to the cords by the needle)?
    > And they replace your super-light latex tube with a $2 butyl tube. How nice.

    There are several occasions where a tube replacement is needed but I don't know that this was one of
    them. As I suggested, read the tubular repair item in the FAQ where tube replacement is explained.
    It does not require opening any more tire than a patch and boot requires.

    >> I would much rather pay the extra $$ for them to either just open the tire and mend the original
    >>tube, or use factory quality base tape.

    > If you are going to bother with tubulars, then own the entire experience, including flat repair.
    > If you can't be bothered, do what the rest of us do; get clinchers. But this is nonsense. Paying
    > someone to repair a tire is one thing, paying good money for base tape that is improperly glued
    > and unnecessary replacement of the tube is another.

    Amen!

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  10. Emory

    Emory Guest

    [email protected] wrote

    > If you are going to ride tubular tires, today even more than when they were the mainstream, you
    > should become proficient in their repair. This is both for cost and reliability reasons, the
    > second may be more important than the first. If your base tapes are not worn through, even if they
    > have tears in them, can be glued back in place with latex rubber emulsion.
    >
    > http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html
    >
    > Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA

    Ok I'm game but the base tape has the worst case of gunked up glue all over it where someone went
    over board gluing. I managed to get the excess off the rims but thought it might be easier to just
    the replace the base tape since it was torn on one tire and lose on another. I don't have any old
    tubies or spare base tape so I though I might send it to someone who did. Any ides there.

    As far as learning to repair what you use I agree. Tubulars are bit more work, that is why I only
    race on them and only certian wheels. I won't argue if they are any better or worse that clinchers
    that point has been done to death.

    Thanks for your time. Emory Ball
     
  11. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Emory Ball writes:

    http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8b.19.html

    > OK I'm game but the base tape has the worst case of gunked up glue all over it where someone went
    > over board gluing. I managed to get the excess off the rims but thought it might be easier to just
    > the replace the base tape since it was torn on one tire and lose on another. I don't have any old
    > tubies or spare base tape so I though I might send it to someone who did. Any ideas there.

    Lay the tire aside and put on a new one. It can't take all that long to develop a worn out tubular
    whose base tape you can steal to repair this one. Get some latex solution and become proficient in
    the art... and read that FAQ item.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  12. On Mon, 16 Jun 2003 05:14:35 +0000, jobst.brand wrote:

    > this one. Get some latex solution and become proficient in the art... and read that FAQ item.

    As a follow-up to those who don't know what the "latex solution" that Jobst refers to is: Go to a
    carpet supply house. No one else will have
    it. Ask specifically for latex emulsion, and if that draws a blank ask for seam sealer and read the
    label. I got a quart of it for $9 -- which is more than a lifetime supply -- and it works
    perfectly.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
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