tubular glue vs. rubber cement

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Doom, Apr 10, 2003.

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  1. Doom

    Doom Guest

    Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and tubular
    glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries tubular glue.
    If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a hardware store that
    would suffice? Thanks.

    --
    --------------------------
    Andre Charlebois BPE, MCSE4.0, CNA, A+ webmaster for Triathlon New Brunswick www.TriNB.com
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>, Doom <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    >tubular glue?

    Rubber cement is not strong enough.

    > I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries tubular glue.

    Ask them to order you a half-dozen tubes. If they can't do that then they either don't care for your
    business or are too incompetent to be your bike shop.

    Many mail-order vendors will sell you glue.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=3313
    http://www.excelsports.com/new.asp?page=8&description=Rim+Cement&vendorCode=CONTI&major=1&minor=28

    > If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a hardware store
    > that would suffice? Thanks.

    Tubular glue is essentially a contact cement, but whether a contact cement from the hardware store
    would hold the tire on I don't know and wouldn't recommend experimenting when known good
    alternatives are out there (ie, real rim cement). Keep in mind that the glue needs to not only have
    a strong enough bond but also react well to the sometimes considerable heat from rim brakes.

    Many people use 3M Fastack which is not a bicycle-specific product but does successfully hold tires
    on rims. I don't generally see it in hardware stores but perhaps a good auto-parts store or auto
    body shop would have it - it is marketed as a "trim adhesive" for cars. I don't prefer it to real
    rim cement.

    If there are any track riders in your area, they'll know where to get glue.

    --Paul
     
  3. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Andre Charlebois writes:

    > Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    > tubular glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries
    > tubular glue. If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a
    > hardware store that would suffice?

    Yes. Tubular cement must be pressure sensitive (aka sticky) or hardening glue like shellac (track
    glue). Rubber cement has no adhesion once cured. Not only is that unsafe but it prevents changing a
    flat and getting the spare to stick.

    NEVER! use RTV sealer because it put silicones on the rim, the world's best mold release, that would
    prevent any other glue from sticking.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
  4. On Thu, 10 Apr 2003 23:32:26 +0000, Doom wrote:

    > Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    > tubular glue?

    Yes. tubular glue has to remain flexible and sticky even after the tire had been removed and
    replaced (think flats). Rubber cement will not re-stick. Besides, I don't think it's strong enough.

    > I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries tubular glue.

    Where are you getting the wheel from?  What shop would sell a wheel, but no glue? Glue is easily
    available on the internet. Some folks like Fastack -- automotive trim glue. Check Manny, Moe, and
    Jack for that.

    Wait a minute. You're in New Bruswick? Oh, Nova Scotia, not New Jersey...

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems. _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Jeff Martin

    Jeff Martin Guest

    Got to any good auto parts store and pickup some 3M Fastac #8031. This has worked great for my for
    years and is much cheaper then tubular glue. "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 10 Apr 2003 23:32:26 +0000, Doom wrote:
    >
    > > Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference
    between
    > > rubber cement and tubular glue?
    >
    > Yes. tubular glue has to remain flexible and sticky even after the tire had been removed
    > and replaced (think flats). Rubber cement will not re-stick. Besides, I don't think it's
    > strong enough.
    >
    > > I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries tubular glue.
    >
    > Where are you getting the wheel from? What shop would sell a wheel, but no glue? Glue is easily
    > available on the internet. Some folks like Fastack -- automotive trim glue. Check Manny, Moe, and
    > Jack for that.
    >
    > Wait a minute. You're in New Bruswick? Oh, Nova Scotia, not New Jersey...
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems. _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    > (_)/ (_) |
     
  6. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Doom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    > tubular glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries
    > tubular glue. If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a
    > hardware store that would suffice? Thanks.

    3M Fastack is an acceptable tubular cement, available at auto body supply stores. Rubber cement is
    nowhere near safe.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  7. Bob Shanteau

    Bob Shanteau Guest

    "Doom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    > tubular glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries
    > tubular glue. If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a
    > hardware store that would suffice? Thanks.
    >
    > Andre Charlebois BPE, MCSE4.0, CNA, A+ webmaster for Triathlon New Brunswick www.TriNB.com

    Andre,

    You can get tubular glue at good prices from either La Bicicleta or Ital-Tecno, both Canadian
    bike shops:

    http://www.labicicletta.com/wheels.html

    http://www.ital-tecno.com/webpage2.htm

    They also have good prices on tires.

    The following article describes the advantages and disadvantages of various brands of tubular
    glue, including 3M Fast Tack. The best glue for road use is Vittoria Mastik One. Use at least one
    coat on the rim and one coat on the tire. Install the tire right after applying the last coat on
    the rim. I now use a flux brush and find that it is no longer a messy job (I used to try to use
    the tip of the tube or my finger to spread the glue). I apply a little glue to the brush and
    spread the glue between spoke holes. Repeat until the whole rim is done. This is an excellent
    article on gluing tubulars:

    http://www.engr.ukans.edu/~ktl/bicycle/Tubular.html

    Is the rim on the tubular rim you are purchasing made of metal or carbon fiber? I've never used
    carbon fiber, but I understand there are some special considerations for cleaning glue off the rim.
    There is really no reason to ever clean the rim, though. I only do it when the brand of glue on the
    rim is different from the brand I am applying, since it is a good idea not to mix brands. In your
    case, start with a high quality brand like Vittoria Mastik One, stick with it, and you won't ever
    have to worry about cleaning rims.

    Bob Shanteau
     
  8. Doom-<< Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    tubular glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries
    tubular glue. If rubber cement is a poor choice,

    Go to a good hardware store and get some 3M 'Fastac' trim adhesive..I wouldn't use rubber cement-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. Mike Krueger

    Mike Krueger Guest

    << Might be a stupid question, but is there any functional difference between rubber cement and
    tubular glue? I'm getting a tubular wheel, and there is no bike shop in the area that carries
    tubular glue. If rubber cement is a poor choice, is there another generic glue available at a
    hardware store that would suffice? Thanks. >>

    A buddy of mine thought he could use "barge" cement (shoe glue) to mount his tubulars, and the
    result was not pretty. Moral of the story: use the right tool for the job. Properly gluing a tubular
    will insure that the tire does not roll off, wrecking your bike and seriously injuring you. The best
    products are Vittoria Mastik One and Continental rim cement, available from many mail order
    suppliers for about $3/tube.
     
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