tubulars and puncture sealants

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by slowfoot, Feb 4, 2013.

  1. slowfoot

    slowfoot New Member

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    i'm thinking of moving to tubular road tires.

    my area in upstate NY has lots of chipsealed roads and gravelly crap on them.

    can everyone chime in on the use of liquid sealants (eg. stan's) for flat protection to get me back home after a puncture.
    does it work? is it easy? does it degrade the tires?

    i am hesitant to goto tubulars due to having to fix flats.

    dont care about the work involved or the added cost

    dave
     
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  2. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    I have not used these CO2 and sealants but i know other people in the forum do. However i do have experience repairing tubulars, you need to buy a special kind of yarn or thread, wax, a thick needle and the rest of the standard items like patches, glue and sandpaper. It is important to sew evenly at the end when you are done.
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Yellow Jersey still sells bulk packs of el cheapo training sewups for the poorer among us. Great deals on throwaway tubulars (probaly pisses off the whale savers, but hey, it's damned convenient). Flipping a spare on while on the road is duck soup easy and done much easier than a clincher with frozen fingers.

    Repair of sewup punctures really isn't that bad. Dunk the tub or soap spray ti find the hole. Mark it with a pen or chalk. Peel up the base tape. Carefully cut the stitching and remove with tweezers or hemostats for about 3"-4". Pull out the tube and patch. Talcum powder. CAREFULLY sew the seam back up with an inch or so of overlap on both sides of the incision.

    OK...so it really is a bit of bother...

    Never tried the Slime or Stan's in a tubular, but it should work as well or not well as it does in any other tube. As an aside, Ohio has the same chip & seal cheese grater roads and even my cheap training sewups hold up OK on them.
     
  4. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    Along with sealant, If yer gonna ride on shit roads a lot and don't race regularly, go with something sturdy. You'll still get a nice ride quality.

    As far as repair, there are probably still some places that will charge $10 a pop to repair. I tried repairing a couple and then started just stacking them on the side with the best intentions. Fixing them is a pain in the ass. Some of them made it pretty far into the tread life, I had others with less than 100 miles on 'em on my stack. When I quit riding for a spell they all ended up in the trash.

    Nowadays I ride on wide rims w/latex inner tubes under expensive tires. Almost as good a ride with non of the hassle.
     
  5. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    oops, double post
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I've not found PitStop to work terribly well. Some say Stan's works well. Others like Caffe Latex. I wouldn't count on such sealants doing the job. Unless racing, I'd choose something like Conti Sprinter Gatorskins. They have pretty good puncture resistance. I'd definitely learn to repair tubular flats. My modus operandi was to collect a number of flat tubies, and when a crappy day came along, I'd pull up a 6 pack, a DVD, and the tubie repair bits. It's a pretty easy process, although not particularly thumb friendly.
     
  7. Pat Stowe

    Pat Stowe New Member

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    I've used tufo sealant and have some canned vittoria I haven't tried yet. Stuff works great for punctures up to 1 mm, love it!
     
  8. BrianNystrom

    BrianNystrom Member

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    Although I stopped riding tubulars in 2011, I used Stan's sealant in mine for several years prior to that and it nearly eliminated flats. Around here, one of the most common causes of road flats is tiny pieces of wire that come from the steel belts of worn-out car tires. Sealant eliminated those flats entirely. I would definitely recommend it.
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    From several tests I've read on the internet and videos that I've seen on Youtube Stans beat out all the others at sealing leaks. But like any sealant you need to refresh it every 3 to 4 mos depending on weather, 3 mos for warm climates and 4 for cold climates.
     
  10. Dr Hongzhi Mo

    Dr Hongzhi Mo New Member

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    goto tubluars is actually a degrade, not an upgrade. I've been use tubluars, then clinchers, and soon to tubeless, now already 2 years in tubeless and i won't go back to any other options, tubeless is so good in all factors.
    But i still can give you some idea about your questions cause i have've been using tubluars for around 1 and a half year also with and without sealants.
    Yes, sealant works in some small puncture like metal wires. Usually i got a wire in the tire i will notice the day after my ride, it will leak in the next day, then find the wire, take out, and rotate the puncture to 6 oclock, it will be just fixed and hold presure very ok. But Bigger than a small nail won't seal.
    one side effect is the inner tube comes with powder inside to keep inner tube from stick to each other, that mix will sealant will be really sticky, it can totally block valve stem, even you remove the core, it won't leak any air just within 1 month you put sealant in. And also valve core will be very easily blocked.
    This can be solved by put some water with dish cleaner and wash the powder out before put on, and also put in fleash water to wash everything out then roll the tire to force all water out. Its actually not difficult, i can finish one tire in 5 minutes.
    the best part of tubluars is it's so easy to change a tire at road side, with carrying a used tire with old glue on it, it just cost 2-3 minutes to tear off a tire and put on the spare one.
    Anyway, you can just convert any clinchers to a tubeless only need to put on tubeless tape, why not try tubeless first before you change your wheels.
     
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