Tubulars For Clydesdales

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by garage sale GT, Jun 18, 2015.

  1. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Can clydesdales use tubulars?

    Before aluminum and carbon frames, race frames were made for 125-150lb racers and felt a little flexy under heavier riders. Are tubular tires and rims the same in that they are made only for light riders?

    Tubular rims are light but would a clydesdale start to experience cracking around the eyelets?

    Has any clydesdale here gotten a lot of life out of tubular tires and rims, especially from the six speed era?
     
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  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    "Can clydesdales use tubulars?"

    Yes. I've known guys in the 200 pound weight range to use sew-ups with no more tire and wheel problems than when they were riding clinchers.

    Sew-up rims of equal quality and spoke count are no stronger and no weaker than their clincher/wired-on counterparts. The quality of the wheel building job along with the spokes chosen will determine the life span of the wheel...that and watching where one rides.

    A 165-175 pound road racer will dish out far more power and abuse to his wheels on a more frequent basis than a 200-pound recreational rider that puts in 100-miles/week just cruising along.
     
  3. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Any problems will probably manifest themselves in the tires, not the wheels. Cheap tires use butyl tubes and don't have a fabric chafing strip between the stitching and the tube. Those threads will abrade the tube a lot faster under a clyde. Also, avoid anything skinnier than 25 mm--well, maybe 23 mm if the road is glassy smooth. Besides being more durable and comfortable, fatter tires will roll faster.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Quote by OBC:
    "Any problems will probably manifest themselves in the tires, not the wheels."

    Yeah, I forgot to point that out.

    A heavier rider is going to bitch about the short service life of the cheaper training sew-ups from the Yellow Jersey or what not. Hell, even as a skinny young fart I could burn through three dozen of those in an Ohio racing season...and did. If you're willing to peel & pull at the roadside and just toss them in the trash like I did $$7-8 back in the day it's a fairly cheap route to great adhesion, road feel, ride quality and speed, of course.

    A heavier rider will benefit from finding tires that work for a racer's abuse. Spend the money up front and either learn to repair punctures or send them off in batches and pay to have them repaired.

    I've got to say that in 1970 or 1980-something the decision to go to with sew-ups for ride or speed was a no-brainer. With the advances in clincher rims and tires the performance and ride quality gap has been narrowed considerably. Nothing beats the ease of a fast roadside tire change with sew-ups though. Your 'Oh So Pro' white bar tape is going to need a cleaning no matter whether your prying a wired-on or tubular tire off!
     
  5. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Thank you for the help.

    Some high end racing grades of frame tubing are not for everybody because they can supposedly feel flexy under a larger rider.

    I was concerned that some tubular rims might also be built for lightness at all cost.
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Just like clinchers, tubular rims come in all flavors. Uber-light carbon climbing rims, carbon training and racing weight aero rims, aluminum-carbon combinations, aluminum in heavy, training and racing weights and various shapes from classic box section to the semi-aero 21, 24, 32 MM heights etc. to fairly aero models.

    Regardless of tire type or rim material, some are fragile and some are robust.

    Again, spoke gauge, spoke count and a quality build job WILL matter to a heavier rider. Every wheel builder has his favorite combination. I like Colorado Cyclist's wheel builds and talking to their wheel builders for advice will only cost you the phone call.
     
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