Tubulars or Clinchers?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Az cactus, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. Az cactus

    Az cactus New Member

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    Ok, I'd like to know your expert opinion on this, I'm willing to spend $1000.00 on a wheelset, I just upgraded to cat 3 and never rode tubulars and I'm thinking about it, just recall an organizer at a race saying " if you see anybody racing crits on tubulars tell the officials, that's too dangerous.
    Should I stick to clinchers?
    Pros and cons?, maybe there is a post about it already, Didn't found anything though, ... any comments?

    Az C
     
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  2. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    Where the hell did that come from??? I don't suppose said organiser has noticed that people have been racing crits on tub's for the last squillion years? The World, as we know it, is coming to an end. We used to live in cardboard box in middle t'road, lad...
    On your question, clinchers nowadays are so good that I don't know that I'd bother with changing to tub's for the road. Tub's are quick to change and nice to ride, but the difference ain't what it used to be. As to tub's being unsafe for crits - absolute crap.
     
  3. chrispopovic

    chrispopovic New Member

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    Ignore your friends, buy the tubulars. Anyone who tells you they're too much trouble either hasn't ridden them or doesn't know better. I've ridden Ksyrium clincher SSCs for years. They are absolutley bullet proof and wonderful wheels. However, I just bought a set of ZIPP 404s and WOW! I've got over 800 miles on them in the past month and a half and they're a dream. Tubs give you a much better feel for the road and tend to almost "give back" the energy you put in them. I've ridden mine in crits, road races, and training and they perform fine. Just take note that the tires aren't cheap and you're not going to get the miles out of the rubber that you get on your clinchers. Tub rubber is definitely more expensive. They also tend to lose air rather quickly too. But that's mainly because of the cheap valve extenders I put on the 404s. Rookie mistaked on my part. And I would definitely reccomend you take the time to learn how to stretch your tires. A good tip I got was to buy an old pair of tube rims (hell, you can pretty much find them on eBay for nothing) and stretch out your spare(s). It's a bitch at first but you'll figure it out. You can go with the tape to get 'em on but after awhile you may decide to glue 'em raw.

    Best of luck and enjoy the wheels.
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I think that official was deranged. Dangerous? Hmmm. I've only been riding clinchers, but in 5 days the Reynolds Stratus DV tubs that I ordered will be here. So I guess I'll see what tubs are all about real soon.
     
  5. Eastway82

    Eastway82 New Member

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    I've been itching to get back to tubs since I got back into cycling a few years ago (always rode and raced tubs twenty years ago). Clinchers now are very good, but there's nothing like the feel of a good tub at very high pressure, for a really zingy ride. I'm restoring my old race bike and just for fun the other day took the front wheel out of my current bike (FSA RD400 radial spoke with Mich Krylion carbon clincher) and put in a 25 year old Campag record/Mavic GP4 32-spoke front with a new tub. Guess which one feels nicest! And despite all the claims for light weight from FSA, the old tub wheel was the same weight, give or take a few grammes.
    If the cash fairy ever visits me again, I'll be after some new wheels and tubs.
     
  6. rudycyclist

    rudycyclist New Member

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    $1000 will buy you a nice wheelset, possibly some carbons:p. Our team races Bontrager X Lite carbon aeros (tubular). Our team manager takes care of any repairs/re gluing. If it was my choice, I'd probably stick to clinchers although the X Lite carbon aeros only come in tubular. I think that may be the only reason we use tubular is because these wheels only come in tubular. Getting back to what kind of wheels to buy, I'd stick with clinchers. Easy to change and reliable. See if you can ride a set of tubulars to feel any difference in ride quality.
     
  7. BlueJersey

    BlueJersey New Member

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    Go tubular if you want sub 1400g deep dish, 38mm and up, carbon wheels.

     
  8. JIM WV

    JIM WV New Member

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    Foolish comment, having ridden both for 19 years. Personally, if a tubular is glued properly, I believe that they are safer than a clincher in case of a puncture. Clinchers typically go limp and flop on the rim allowing the rim to hit the pavement -- with an immediate crash which has happened to me. Tubulars puncture and tend to flatten out on the rim and you can maintain a degree of control. Plus, I've punctured tubs in crits and easily ridden the balance of my lap to the wheelpit without much of a problem. A completely flat clincher can be near impossible to ride on even very very slowly.

    Wouldn't use tubs for training anymore but I still prefer them for racing.
     
  9. Fox Farm

    Fox Farm New Member

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    Well said. I use both and have used my tubs for training. Tufo Hi Carbon tires and they last much longer than most tubs. Cost about $45 each. I have used both glue and glue tape and find the tape to be quick and easy. I also use the Tufo sealant in the tires so I seldom have flats if ever. I tend to wear out the tire before I kill it with a flat.

    I have recently tried the Tufo tubular clichners and they are pretty good. Not as supple as tubulars or Conti 3000 Grand Prix clinchers but they have excellent wear and rolling feelings. They will take you a little while to learn how to mount them but after doing it twice, it's not a problem. I inflate them fully unmounted to let them stretch out a little, just like with regular tubulars.
     
  10. EoinC

    EoinC New Member

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    That's good to hear. My old Saronni is hanging on the workshop wall at my house down in Australia. I have plans of resurrecting it for old times sake. It has 32 hole Dura-Ace hubs on GP4 rims - Bullet-proof. The rims still have the last set of tubs mounted on them - circa 1983 - I wonder if they've matured yet?
     
  11. Az cactus

    Az cactus New Member

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    Thanks for all your comments guys, I appreciate them, I'll definitely go with tubulars, I'll look for a good set tomorrow!.

    AzC
     
  12. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    i'm late to the thread, but i'll add my 2 cents worth anyway.l

    i've been on tubiulars since 1972. i have never rolled one off the rim. learning to properly mount a sew-up is easy. just ask the local 'old-timers' for their advice. and gm fastac makes it darn near impossible to roll a tire.

    last month i ordered a new bike with all the bells and whistles. i let the young salesguy talk me into trying the 'new' clinchers. after giving them 400+ miles i'm going back to tubulars.
     
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