Tufo Extreme Tape



Has anyone changed a set of tubies after using Tufo tape? I am changing
to Vittoria tires, and Tufo doesn't appear to have info about whether
to completely remove the old tape or just stick another layer onto the
rim.
In taking the old tire off, though, I can say the Extreme tape is
really good - there were no starved joints or thin spots. The tire took
alot of effort to get it to peel off, and would be unlikely to snap off
the rim.
Naptha works OK,but the tape doesn't dissolve as fast as red or clear
tubular cement.
 
On 15 Sep 2005 18:16:34 -0700, [email protected] wrote:


>Naptha works OK,but the tape doesn't dissolve as fast as red or clear
>tubular cement.


My experience with any "goo" is to have four solvents on hand: Wood
alcohol, lacquer thinner, enamel reducer (from auto paint finishing)
and acetone. I haven't found any good yet that one of those four will
not remove.

But, I have to admit that I have not tried to remove
the tires I put on with tufo tape, so YMMV.
 
I used naptha on one of the wheels, and it took a long time. About 1/3
of the way around the second wheel, I looked up at one of the garage
shelves and noticed a can of gumout choke and carb cleaner. I has
acetone and xylene, among other ingredients. Lo and behold, the gumout
(likely the acetone) softened the Tufo glue, and following up with
naptha cleaned off the remaining film.
I followed up with citrus cleaner and gave the wheels and spokes a good
drying.
Looking at the tufo tape residue after getting the tires off, the stuff
is pretty amazing. It covered the rim from edge to edge - no starved
joints, and it even got in under the eyelets. Once I get the new tires
on with the tape, I'm sure they'll hold.
 
[email protected] wrote:
> I used naptha on one of the wheels, and it took a long time. About 1/3
> of the way around the second wheel, I looked up at one of the garage
> shelves and noticed a can of gumout choke and carb cleaner. I has
> acetone and xylene, among other ingredients. Lo and behold, the gumout
> (likely the acetone) softened the Tufo glue, and following up with
> naptha cleaned off the remaining film.
> I followed up with citrus cleaner and gave the wheels and spokes a good
> drying.
> Looking at the tufo tape residue after getting the tires off, the stuff
> is pretty amazing. It covered the rim from edge to edge - no starved
> joints, and it even got in under the eyelets. Once I get the new tires
> on with the tape, I'm sure they'll hold.


I'm confused. Will the old Tufo tape residue hold a new tire, should
you remove the old tape completely, or just lay a fresh strip over the
old one? I would not want to have to clean off the old tape residue as
you did every time I needed to replace a tubular. That's not something
you have to do with regular rim cement.
 
After having done the whole cleaning thing, I wouldn't do it again. The
Tufo tape becomes a layer of clear cement once it's in place and you've
ridden on the tires. Because the bond is electrostatic rather than
mechanical, if there is a next time, I'll just slap on another strip of
the tape. The two-sided cover allows for getting the tire on straight
prior to exposing the tire side of the tape and inflating to the
correct pressure.
Additionally, the Vittoria EVO Pave, which replaced the Tufo S33, is a
much easier-rolling tire. Now my clinchers are Vittoria EVO CX, and the
tubies are Vittoria EVO CG Pave tires, and I no longer keep checking to
see whether my brakes are rubbing. That's how heavy the Tufo rolling
resistance felt...there were some earlier posts indicating that Tufo
tubulars and tape cost about 20 watts, and although I don't have a
power meter, the Tufo rolling resistance is definitely high.