TUFO tubular-clincher caution



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Bryan C

Guest
I recently installed the TUFO Prestige Cyclocross tubular-clinchers. I
had read that they could be run at lower pressure than clinchers
without fear of a pinch flat. Since the max pressure on these is 65
psi, I aired them down by increments until I was at 30 lbs on the
front tire, 40 on the rear. This didn't seem especially low, but while
turning a corner on pavement at around 20 mph, the front tire came off
the rim, dumping me hard. I have since looked for recommended minimum
pressure on these tires, but I haven't found any. Any recommendations
on minimum pressure from experience? Obviously, for me it is higher
than 30 psi. So what good are these tires if they have to stay pumped
up as high or higher than clinchers?
 
E

Eric S. Sande

Guest
>So what good are these tires if they have to stay pumped up as high
>or higher than clinchers?


I'm one of the few riders here that actually still rides tubies.

On occasion.

One answer is that you can pump them up to a high level, MUCH
higher than clinchers. Why this is desirable is an open question.

It's definitely better to have a harder tire, but the downside
is that they are more susceptible to flatting.

Also they are very difficult to patch, it is not a trivial exercise
to patch a tubular tire.

Trust me, you are going to have to carry the extra tire, the Tubasti
cement, and so forth.

And the needle and thread to sew up the casing in the event you can
actually find the hole in the tube.


_______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
__________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
 
B

Benjamin Weiner

Guest
Eric S. Sande <[email protected]> wrote:

> >So what good are these tires if they have to stay pumped up as high
> >or higher than clinchers?


> One answer is that you can pump them up to a high level, MUCH
> higher than clinchers. Why this is desirable is an open question.
> It's definitely better to have a harder tire, but the downside
> is that they are more susceptible to flatting.


> Also they are very difficult to patch, it is not a trivial exercise
> to patch a tubular tire.
> Trust me, you are going to have to carry the extra tire, the Tubasti
> cement, and so forth.


The OP was referring to Tufo cyclocross tubular-clinchers
(that mount on a clincher rim). Some cyclocross riders use tubulars
because tubies can run lower pressures (for traction on soft
surfaces) without pinch-flatting. So it's actually the opposite
from what one wants for a road tire. I don't know if
tubular-clinchers on a clincher rim have the same pinch flat
resistance.

People I know who have used Tufo tubular clinchers often found them
very hard to mount or change. Perhaps the OP's rims are a little
undersized and that's why the tire came off. I think 25 psi is a
little low under almost any circumstance, but especially on
pavement. Tufo tubular clinchers have a disadvantage for distance
or training rides - you need to carry an entire spare tire like a t
ubular, but they don't fold up as compact (you could carry a folding
clincher and a tube, though). This isn't an issue on a cyclocross
course where you can run to the pit.
 
D

David L. Johnson

Guest
On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 20:42:42 -0700, Benjamin Weiner wrote:

> The OP was referring to Tufo cyclocross tubular-clinchers (that mount on a
> clincher rim). Some cyclocross riders use tubulars because tubies can run
> lower pressures (for traction on soft surfaces) without pinch-flatting.
> So it's actually the opposite from what one wants for a road tire. I
> don't know if tubular-clinchers on a clincher rim have the same pinch flat
> resistance.


I would doubt it, since the reason tubulars have less likelihood of
pinch-flatting is that the rim does not have such a lip on a tubular.
That is, it's a function of the rim, not magical properties of the tire.

--

David L. Johnson

__o | Let's not escape into mathematics. Let's stay with reality. --
_`\(,_ | Michael Crichton
(_)/ (_) |
 

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