Tunnel Builder pro

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bruce Johnston, Feb 23, 2003.

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  1. Anyone shell out 300,000 smackers for the Cisco software Tunnel Builder Pro?

    We had a local ISP that got cut off from the backbone which was resolved later. They say they run
    tunnels for fun sometimes. They say they ran a tunnel over to a broadband customer who was with a
    broadband service provider, and in behind their firewall, then back out through the NAT in their
    firewall to the outside world. We were talking about the price of the software considering many
    OC-48 operaters have their own fiber. Their response was that how many people have 10 routers
    operating at OC-48? And don't own their own fiber? And don't have oodles of dark fiber? And don't
    peer those routers with several other backbones through which excess traffic can be dumped (for a
    fee) during rare periods of circuit outage? Considering the tradeoffs, who is using Tunnel Builder
    Pro and has justified the cost savings in their network?

    ------------------------------------

    From old article on Cisco Tunnel Builder Pro

    Bandwidth protection, a necessary but expensive staple in high-capacity fiber networks, got better
    and cheaper this week with Cisco Systems' introduction of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
    bandwidth protection.

    The new solution to an old problem features a network architecture that uses MPLS Traffic
    Engineering Fast Reroute and an application developed by PARC Technologies called Tunnel Builder
    Pro. It minimizes and in some cases eliminates the need for non-productive redundant circuits.

    While Cisco's MPLS traffic engineering can compute the best available path in the case of a reroute
    of traffic, Tunnel Builder Pro enhances this capability by computing backup tunnels using an
    algorithm called hybrid optimization. The solution is part of and uses other features of Cisco's
    IOS Software.

    These other features include support of Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP) Hellos, a mechanism
    used for detecting failures in Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and other packet-over-Sonet networks.

    Current methods of protection, such as SONET automatic protection switching and SDH multiplexed
    switching protection, require an equal amount of idle, non-revenue generating capacity to lie in
    wait for a network failure.

    "Even the best protection schemes won't give you 100% protection. So [carriers] need to weigh the
    amount of money they want to spend for it," said Amrit Hanspal, product manager for MPLS and QoS in
    Cisco's Internet technologies division.

    In addition to the one-for-one backup scheme in other protection scenarios, network operators
    generally limit network utilization to 60% before adding more capacity. "That's a lot of unused
    bandwidth," Hanspal said.

    MPLS bandwidth protection can be used in tandem with existing Sonet/SDH protection schemes, but
    rather than eliminating circuits used for protection, Cisco's solution makes that bandwidth
    available for revenue generating traffic.

    Tunnel Builder Pro uses a backup route generator that contains the algorithm for calculating
    the size of necessary backup tunnels. It includes a server that continuously pulls utilization
    and routing information from routers and an HTML/Java-based client that displays a real-time
    network map.

    Although the $300,000 price tag for Tunnel Builder Pro is twice that of a backup OC-48 line card
    required for Sonet/SDH protection, Cisco estimates that the elimination of recurring operating
    expenses associated with maintaining the OC-48 circuits in a 10-router network (approximately
    $800,000) brings its MPLS bandwidth protection in at one-third the cost.

    "MPLS protection gives service providers the two things they want. It reduces capital expense by
    allowing them to leverage existing infrastructure and at the same time cuts operating expenses be
    getting rid of recurring costs for unused circuits," Hanspal said.
     
    Tags:


  2. Sorry, that was mean for Cisco, late really tired, didn't show, RBR is right on top.

    B-
    ----------------------------
    "Bruce Johnston" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Anyone shell out 300,000 smackers for the Cisco software Tunnel Builder
    Pro?
    >
    > We had a local ISP that got cut off from the backbone which was resolved later. They say they run
    > tunnels for fun sometimes. They say they ran a tunnel over to a broadband customer who was with a
    > broadband service provider, and in behind their firewall, then back out through the NAT in their
    > firewall to the outside world. We were talking about the price of
    the
    > software considering many OC-48 operaters have their own fiber. Their response was that how many
    > people have 10 routers operating at OC-48? And don't own their own fiber? And don't have oodles of
    > dark fiber? And
    don't
    > peer those routers with several other backbones through which excess
    traffic
    > can be dumped (for a fee) during rare periods of circuit outage?
    Considering
    > the tradeoffs, who is using Tunnel Builder Pro and has justified the cost savings in their
    > network?
    >
    > ------------------------------------
    >
    > From old article on Cisco Tunnel Builder Pro
    >
    > Bandwidth protection, a necessary but expensive staple in high-capacity fiber networks, got better
    > and cheaper this week with Cisco Systems' introduction of Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS)
    > bandwidth protection.
    >
    > The new solution to an old problem features a network architecture that
    uses
    > MPLS Traffic Engineering Fast Reroute and an application developed by PARC Technologies called
    > Tunnel Builder Pro. It minimizes and in some cases eliminates the need for non-productive
    > redundant circuits.
    >
    > While Cisco's MPLS traffic engineering can compute the best available path in the case of a
    > reroute of traffic, Tunnel Builder Pro enhances this capability by computing backup tunnels
    > using an algorithm called hybrid optimization. The solution is part of and uses other features
    > of Cisco's
    IOS
    > Software.
    >
    > These other features include support of Resource Reservation Protocol
    (RSVP)
    > Hellos, a mechanism used for detecting failures in Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet and other
    > packet-over-Sonet networks.
    >
    > Current methods of protection, such as SONET automatic protection
    switching
    > and SDH multiplexed switching protection, require an equal amount of idle, non-revenue generating
    > capacity to lie in wait for a network failure.
    >
    > "Even the best protection schemes won't give you 100% protection. So [carriers] need to weigh the
    > amount of money they want to spend for it," said Amrit Hanspal, product manager for MPLS and QoS
    > in Cisco's Internet technologies division.
    >
    > In addition to the one-for-one backup scheme in other protection
    scenarios,
    > network operators generally limit network utilization to 60% before adding more capacity. "That's
    > a lot of unused bandwidth," Hanspal said.
    >
    > MPLS bandwidth protection can be used in tandem with existing Sonet/SDH protection schemes, but
    > rather than eliminating circuits used for protection, Cisco's solution makes that bandwidth
    > available for revenue generating traffic.
    >
    > Tunnel Builder Pro uses a backup route generator that contains the
    algorithm
    > for calculating the size of necessary backup tunnels. It includes a server that continuously pulls
    > utilization and routing information from routers
    and
    > an HTML/Java-based client that displays a real-time network map.
    >
    > Although the $300,000 price tag for Tunnel Builder Pro is twice that of a backup OC-48 line card
    > required for Sonet/SDH protection, Cisco estimates that the elimination of recurring operating
    > expenses associated with maintaining the OC-48 circuits in a 10-router network (approximately
    > $800,000) brings its MPLS bandwidth protection in at one-third the cost.
    >
    > "MPLS protection gives service providers the two things they want. It reduces capital expense by
    > allowing them to leverage existing
    infrastructure
    > and at the same time cuts operating expenses be getting rid of recurring costs for unused
    > circuits," Hanspal said.
     
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