Turner tandem

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Bentjay, Sep 23, 2003.

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  1. Bentjay

    Bentjay Guest

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  2. Shwackman

    Shwackman Guest

    What planet is that guy from anyway? I bet the seats don't move either.
     
  3. [email protected] (Shwackman) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > What planet is that guy from anyway? I bet the seats don't move either.

    Owning a Turner SWB with the same type of seat, I beg to differ. I can clearly see the rear
    bracket is similar to mine, and the elasomer "plugs", w/ support beam, which are attached to the
    bottom of the seat by screws, are still there at the base. Turner seats have two pairs of holes
    for bottom adjustment and the back support has two slots to adjust over approximately a
    four-five inch range (I'm not where my bike is at the moment, so can't be more precise). There
    are also three holes in the back support posts to add additional recline options, though not all
    are available depending on how far back you've moved the seat (I am short, so this may be a
    problem only for my framesize).

    I don't own this (or any other) tandem, so I cannot give a knowledgable review. I have enjoyed
    my SWB very much, however, and would try his tandem before dissing it, if the opportunity
    offered itself. If I could find a) a second rider and b) if I could afford a tandem to begin
    with. :) Enjoy your rides.

    Regards,

    escapevelocity 1999 Turner SWB 1999 Wishbone Classic #31
     
  4. Bentbiker

    Bentbiker Guest

    I agree, how can you "knock" a bike, with out any experience or knowledge of it's ability? I rode a
    Turner SWB USS all last summer, it like ALL recumbents had some compromises, but it handled great,
    was very quick and the BEST hardshell seat i've used.

    escapevelocity wrote:
    > [email protected] (Shwackman) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >>What planet is that guy from anyway? I bet the seats don't move either.
    >
    >
    > Owning a Turner SWB with the same type of seat, I beg to differ. I can clearly see the rear
    > bracket is similar to mine, and the elasomer "plugs", w/ support beam, which are attached to
    > the bottom of the seat by screws, are still there at the base. Turner seats have two pairs of
    > holes for bottom adjustment and the back support has two slots to adjust over approximately a
    > four-five inch range (I'm not where my bike is at the moment, so can't be more precise). There
    > are also three holes in the back support posts to add additional recline options, though not
    > all are available depending on how far back you've moved the seat (I am short, so this may be
    > a problem only for my framesize).
    >
    > I don't own this (or any other) tandem, so I cannot give a knowledgable review. I have enjoyed
    > my SWB very much, however, and would try his tandem before dissing it, if the opportunity
    > offered itself. If I could find a) a second rider and b) if I could afford a tandem to begin
    > with. :) Enjoy your rides.
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    > escapevelocity 1999 Turner SWB 1999 Wishbone Classic #31
     
  5. "BentJay" skrev...
    > Here's a new-to-me strange tandem from Turner. Dual in-line steering wheels... whoa!

    It certainly looks intriguing. Wouldn't it need some sort of Ackerman steering? I also wonder how it
    handles. Could someone closer to him sneak by and bum a testride?

    Mikael
     
  6. On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 10:24:45 +0200, "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"BentJay" skrev...
    >> Here's a new-to-me strange tandem from Turner. Dual in-line steering wheels... whoa!
    >
    >It certainly looks intriguing. Wouldn't it need some sort of Ackerman steering? I also wonder how
    >it handles. Could someone closer to him sneak by and bum a testride?

    Ackerman compensates for the difference in steering angle between left
    vs. right wheels. It's even simpler to compensate for middle vs. front wheels - just use a shorter
    arm in front for the linkage rod, so that the front wheel turns more than the middle wheel.
    4-axle trucks do this.

    However I still don't understand the reason for this configuration. Did they decide the frame isn't
    rigid enough to support two riders between two wheels? If so, the frame would be flexing all the
    time to follow road irregularities. Maybe that's OK, but I'd think that strengthening the frame
    would require less weight than an additional wheel.

    Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
     
  7. John Rooker

    John Rooker Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 10:24:45 +0200, "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"BentJay" skrev...
    > >> Here's a new-to-me strange tandem from Turner. Dual in-line steering wheels... whoa!
    > >
    > >It certainly looks intriguing. Wouldn't it need some sort of Ackerman steering? I also wonder how
    > >it handles. Could someone closer to him sneak by and bum a testride?
    >
    > Ackerman compensates for the difference in steering angle between left
    > vs. right wheels. It's even simpler to compensate for middle vs. front wheels - just use a shorter
    > arm in front for the linkage rod, so that the front wheel turns more than the middle wheel.
    > 4-axle trucks do this.
    >
    > However I still don't understand the reason for this configuration. Did they decide the frame
    > isn't rigid enough to support two riders between two wheels? If so, the frame would be flexing all
    > the time to follow road irregularities. Maybe that's OK, but I'd think that strengthening the
    > frame would require less weight than an additional wheel.
    >
    > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
    >

    According to their website, safety was their concern. They feel that the dual front wheels provide
    better cornering and a margin of safety in the event of a front tire blowout.

    http://members.tripod.com/turnerrecumbents/index.HTML

    --
    ___________________
    John Rooker KC2KQT Rochester, NY
     
  8. tla

    tla New Member

    Joined:
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    I asked Milt about the 3-wheel design, here's what he said...
    "Why I am glad you asked, the reason for the three inline wheels are,
    The two front wheels steer so you have direction traction and the wheels span any hole of less than twenty three inches in diameter,
    You have an extra wheel if one tire flats, if a two wheel tandem has a flat there is only one wheel/tire to stop with and one can not stop such a bike at speed with only one brake,
    my machine has four brakes one is a roller drag operated by the stoker,
    it is not necessary to have heavy-duty hubs because the weight is spread over three wheels
    then with the length of a bent tandem the stance of the front wheels keeps the frame from rear wobble."

    Downside is the extra drag, weight and complications of the mid-wheel.

    For another strange tandem, check out the zox duo tandems http://www.zoxbikes.com. They have separately driven wheels.
     
  9. Pete Huber

    Pete Huber Guest

    As a rider of the Barcroft Columbia, there are times my wife would appreciate independent steering.
    Perhaps Turner is on to something.

    Pete Huber Pulaski, VA

    "John Rooker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > On Thu, 25 Sep 2003 10:24:45 +0200, "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > >"BentJay" skrev...
    > > >> Here's a new-to-me strange tandem from Turner. Dual in-line steering wheels... whoa!
    > > >
    > > >It certainly looks intriguing. Wouldn't it need some sort of Ackerman
    steering?
    > > >I also wonder how it handles. Could someone closer to him sneak by and
    bum a testride?
    > >
    > > Ackerman compensates for the difference in steering angle between left
    > > vs. right wheels. It's even simpler to compensate for middle vs. front wheels - just use a
    > > shorter arm in front for the linkage rod, so that the front wheel turns more than the middle
    > > wheel. 4-axle trucks do this.
    > >
    > > However I still don't understand the reason for this configuration. Did they decide the frame
    > > isn't rigid enough to support two riders between two wheels? If so, the frame would be flexing
    > > all the time to follow road irregularities. Maybe that's OK, but I'd think that strengthening
    > > the frame would require less weight than an additional wheel.
    > >
    > > Ken Kobayashi [email protected] http://solarwww.mtk.nao.ac.jp/kobayashi/personal/
    > >
    >
    > According to their website, safety was their concern. They feel that the dual front wheels provide
    > better cornering and a margin of safety in the event of a front tire blowout.
    >
    > http://members.tripod.com/turnerrecumbents/index.HTML
    >
    > --
    > ___________________
    > John Rooker KC2KQT Rochester, NY
     
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