Tutoring the next generation of foodies

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Cindy Fuller, Mar 30, 2005.

  1. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.

    Last night as I was making our dinner, the phone rang. "Cindy, Mom's
    stuck in traffic and I've got to get dinner started. HELP!" I went
    over to find one frazzled 14-year-old. We made the dashi broth from
    scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    mushrooms. She cut up the tofu, but found that the fish cake she'd
    bought the night before was moldy. Luckily, her mother stopped by the
    grocery store on the way home and picked up some surimi (fake crab) as a
    substitute. We also loaned her some cheesecloth to strain the dashi,
    and sake and dark soy sauce to finish off the dish.

    After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    ago. The soup was quite photogenic, which should make a good impression
    on her Japanese teacher.

    All in a day's work.
    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    > [snip great story]


    What a lucky kid to have such good parents and neighbors. -aem
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    > [snip great story]


    What a lucky kid to have such good parents and neighbors. -aem
     
  4. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Cindy Fuller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    > Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    > photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    > over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    > admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    > experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    > recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.
    >
    > Last night as I was making our dinner, the phone rang. "Cindy, Mom's
    > stuck in traffic and I've got to get dinner started. HELP!" I went
    > over to find one frazzled 14-year-old. We made the dashi broth from
    > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > mushrooms. She cut up the tofu, but found that the fish cake she'd
    > bought the night before was moldy. Luckily, her mother stopped by the
    > grocery store on the way home and picked up some surimi (fake crab) as a
    > substitute. We also loaned her some cheesecloth to strain the dashi,
    > and sake and dark soy sauce to finish off the dish.
    >
    > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > ago. The soup was quite photogenic, which should make a good impression
    > on her Japanese teacher.
    >
    > All in a day's work.
    > Cindy
    >
    > --
    > C.J. Fuller


    Cool Neighbor

    The next step...........................................

    Yakitory! Uh Oh!
     
  5. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Cindy Fuller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    > Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    > photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    > over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    > admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    > experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    > recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.
    >
    > Last night as I was making our dinner, the phone rang. "Cindy, Mom's
    > stuck in traffic and I've got to get dinner started. HELP!" I went
    > over to find one frazzled 14-year-old. We made the dashi broth from
    > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > mushrooms. She cut up the tofu, but found that the fish cake she'd
    > bought the night before was moldy. Luckily, her mother stopped by the
    > grocery store on the way home and picked up some surimi (fake crab) as a
    > substitute. We also loaned her some cheesecloth to strain the dashi,
    > and sake and dark soy sauce to finish off the dish.
    >
    > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > ago. The soup was quite photogenic, which should make a good impression
    > on her Japanese teacher.
    >
    > All in a day's work.
    > Cindy
    >
    > --
    > C.J. Fuller


    Cool Neighbor

    The next step...........................................

    Yakitory! Uh Oh!
     
  6. George

    George Guest

    Dimitri wrote:
    > "Cindy Fuller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    >>Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    >>photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    >>over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    >>admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    >>experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    >>recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.
    >>
    >>Last night as I was making our dinner, the phone rang. "Cindy, Mom's
    >>stuck in traffic and I've got to get dinner started. HELP!" I went
    >>over to find one frazzled 14-year-old. We made the dashi broth from
    >>scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    >>mushrooms. She cut up the tofu, but found that the fish cake she'd
    >>bought the night before was moldy. Luckily, her mother stopped by the
    >>grocery store on the way home and picked up some surimi (fake crab) as a
    >>substitute. We also loaned her some cheesecloth to strain the dashi,
    >>and sake and dark soy sauce to finish off the dish.
    >>
    >>After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    >>mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    >>was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    >>of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    >>ago. The soup was quite photogenic, which should make a good impression
    >>on her Japanese teacher.
    >>
    >>All in a day's work.
    >>Cindy
    >>
    >>--
    >>C.J. Fuller

    >
    >
    > Cool Neighbor
    >
    > The next step...........................................
    >
    > Yakitory! Uh Oh!
    >
    >

    I was thinking okonomiyaki. It is definitely Japanese origin and easy
    for kids to make.
     
  7. George

    George Guest

    Dimitri wrote:
    > "Cindy Fuller" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    >>Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    >>photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    >>over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    >>admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    >>experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    >>recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.
    >>
    >>Last night as I was making our dinner, the phone rang. "Cindy, Mom's
    >>stuck in traffic and I've got to get dinner started. HELP!" I went
    >>over to find one frazzled 14-year-old. We made the dashi broth from
    >>scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    >>mushrooms. She cut up the tofu, but found that the fish cake she'd
    >>bought the night before was moldy. Luckily, her mother stopped by the
    >>grocery store on the way home and picked up some surimi (fake crab) as a
    >>substitute. We also loaned her some cheesecloth to strain the dashi,
    >>and sake and dark soy sauce to finish off the dish.
    >>
    >>After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    >>mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    >>was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    >>of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    >>ago. The soup was quite photogenic, which should make a good impression
    >>on her Japanese teacher.
    >>
    >>All in a day's work.
    >>Cindy
    >>
    >>--
    >>C.J. Fuller

    >
    >
    > Cool Neighbor
    >
    > The next step...........................................
    >
    > Yakitory! Uh Oh!
    >
    >

    I was thinking okonomiyaki. It is definitely Japanese origin and easy
    for kids to make.
     
  8. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    >Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    >photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came

    That's pretty cool. I can't even imagine trying to learn Japanese.
    We were, for a short time, acquainted with a Chinese couple. We never
    really communicated all that well, but their food was great.
     
  9. AlleyGator

    AlleyGator Guest

    Cindy Fuller <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    >Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    >photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came

    That's pretty cool. I can't even imagine trying to learn Japanese.
    We were, for a short time, acquainted with a Chinese couple. We never
    really communicated all that well, but their food was great.
     
  10. One time on Usenet, "aem" <[email protected]> said:
    > Cindy Fuller wrote:
    >
    > > [snip great story]

    >
    > What a lucky kid to have such good parents and neighbors. -aem


    My thoughts exactly... :)

    --
    J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
    "You still haven't explained why the pool is
    filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
     
  11. One time on Usenet, "aem" <[email protected]> said:
    > Cindy Fuller wrote:
    >
    > > [snip great story]

    >
    > What a lucky kid to have such good parents and neighbors. -aem


    My thoughts exactly... :)

    --
    J.J. in WA ~ mom, vid gamer, novice cook ~
    "You still haven't explained why the pool is
    filled with elf blood." - Frylock, ATHF
     
  12. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    We made the dashi broth from
    > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > mushrooms.


    >
    > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > ago.



    That was a nice thing you did. Now where's the recipe?

    gloria p
     
  13. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    We made the dashi broth from
    > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > mushrooms.


    >
    > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > ago.



    That was a nice thing you did. Now where's the recipe?

    gloria p
     
  14. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    > Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    > Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    > photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    > over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    > admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    > experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    > recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.


    Sorry but I just had an image of the girl taking a picture of her family
    sitting there with their chopsticks and trying to eat the soup. :)
     
  15. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:

    > Our next door neighbors' daughter is studying Japanese in middle school.
    > Her latest assignment was to cook a Japanese meal for her family, then
    > photograph the results. She wanted to make an udon soup, so she came
    > over to look for recipes in our cookbook collection. I'm the first to
    > admit that Japanese is low on my list of cookbooks, due to bad
    > experiences with early experiments in the cuisine. However, we found a
    > recipe for udon that involved poaching an egg in the broth.


    Sorry but I just had an image of the girl taking a picture of her family
    sitting there with their chopsticks and trying to eat the soup. :)
     
  16. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Puester <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Cindy Fuller wrote:
    >
    > We made the dashi broth from
    > > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > > mushrooms.

    >
    > >
    > > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > > ago.

    >
    >
    > That was a nice thing you did. Now where's the recipe?
    >

    Somehow I KNEW someone would ask. It's actually recipes. These are
    from "The Noodle Shop Cookbook", by Jacki Passmore.

    First you have to make dashi:

    1 1/2 qt. cold water
    1/4 oz. kombu seaweed
    1/2 oz. dried bonito flakes (we used more like 1/4 oz.)

    Place bonito and kombu in pot with water. Bring to boil; reduce heat
    and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, then strain
    through cheesecloth-lined sieve.

    Now you put together the udon hot pot:

    1 lb. dried udon
    1/2 lb. boneless chicken breast
    4 oz. semifirm tofu
    2 oz. kamaboko (Japanese fish cake) or surimi
    4 shiitake mushrooms, soaked 25 minutes if dried
    8 small whole scallions
    4 eggs
    shichimi (Japanese pepper)
    4 tempura shrimp (optional--we didn't use them)

    broth:
    the prepared dashi
    1/4 c. tamari or light soy sauce
    2 tsp. dark soy sauce
    1 1/2 tsp. mirin (we used sake and added a little more sugar)
    1 1/2 tbsp. sugar

    Bring 1 1/2 quarts water to boil. Add noodles; bring water back to
    boil. Pour in 1 cup cold water and again bring to boil. Add another
    cup cold water and bring back to boil. Cook 2 minutes, then test. Udon
    should still be firm at this stage. Drain and cover with cold water.

    Cut chicken, tofu, and kamaboko into 4 even-sized pieces. Set aside.
    Cut greens of 2 scallions into thin slices and set aside. Diagonally
    cut the remaining scallions into 3" pieces.

    Bring broth ingredients to boil; reduce heat and keep warm. Divide
    noodles evenly among 4 individual serving casseroles. Add chicken,
    kamaboko, tofu, mushrooms, and scallion pieces to each casserole. Add
    broth, cover and simmer 6-7 minutes. Can also be cooked in microwave on
    high for 2 minutes or in 375° oven for 10 minutes.

    Use chopsticks to make a depression in the center of the noodles. Break
    an egg over each portion. Place tempura shrimp (if using) beside the
    egg. Cover casseroles; cook another 2-3 minutes. Don't let egg become
    too firm. Uncover, sprinkle on reserved scallion greens, and serve at
    once.

    My young neighbor is a pretty accomplished cook already, courtesy of her
    mother. She and a friend cooked the entire Thanksgiving dinner by
    themselves last year. Last summer I taught her how to make blackberry
    crisp. Most of what I did yesterday was keep her calm and focused on
    what she needed to do.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  17. Cindy Fuller

    Cindy Fuller Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Puester <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Cindy Fuller wrote:
    >
    > We made the dashi broth from
    > > scratch, something I'd never done before, and soaked the shiitake
    > > mushrooms.

    >
    > >
    > > After we had finished eating, the phone rang again. It was my student's
    > > mother: "I'm bringing over some of this soup. It's wonderful!" And it
    > > was. Dashi made from scratch is a whole lot better than the envelopes
    > > of dashi-no-moto (think dashi bouillon) that turned me off 20+ years
    > > ago.

    >
    >
    > That was a nice thing you did. Now where's the recipe?
    >

    Somehow I KNEW someone would ask. It's actually recipes. These are
    from "The Noodle Shop Cookbook", by Jacki Passmore.

    First you have to make dashi:

    1 1/2 qt. cold water
    1/4 oz. kombu seaweed
    1/2 oz. dried bonito flakes (we used more like 1/4 oz.)

    Place bonito and kombu in pot with water. Bring to boil; reduce heat
    and simmer uncovered for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, then strain
    through cheesecloth-lined sieve.

    Now you put together the udon hot pot:

    1 lb. dried udon
    1/2 lb. boneless chicken breast
    4 oz. semifirm tofu
    2 oz. kamaboko (Japanese fish cake) or surimi
    4 shiitake mushrooms, soaked 25 minutes if dried
    8 small whole scallions
    4 eggs
    shichimi (Japanese pepper)
    4 tempura shrimp (optional--we didn't use them)

    broth:
    the prepared dashi
    1/4 c. tamari or light soy sauce
    2 tsp. dark soy sauce
    1 1/2 tsp. mirin (we used sake and added a little more sugar)
    1 1/2 tbsp. sugar

    Bring 1 1/2 quarts water to boil. Add noodles; bring water back to
    boil. Pour in 1 cup cold water and again bring to boil. Add another
    cup cold water and bring back to boil. Cook 2 minutes, then test. Udon
    should still be firm at this stage. Drain and cover with cold water.

    Cut chicken, tofu, and kamaboko into 4 even-sized pieces. Set aside.
    Cut greens of 2 scallions into thin slices and set aside. Diagonally
    cut the remaining scallions into 3" pieces.

    Bring broth ingredients to boil; reduce heat and keep warm. Divide
    noodles evenly among 4 individual serving casseroles. Add chicken,
    kamaboko, tofu, mushrooms, and scallion pieces to each casserole. Add
    broth, cover and simmer 6-7 minutes. Can also be cooked in microwave on
    high for 2 minutes or in 375° oven for 10 minutes.

    Use chopsticks to make a depression in the center of the noodles. Break
    an egg over each portion. Place tempura shrimp (if using) beside the
    egg. Cover casseroles; cook another 2-3 minutes. Don't let egg become
    too firm. Uncover, sprinkle on reserved scallion greens, and serve at
    once.

    My young neighbor is a pretty accomplished cook already, courtesy of her
    mother. She and a friend cooked the entire Thanksgiving dinner by
    themselves last year. Last summer I taught her how to make blackberry
    crisp. Most of what I did yesterday was keep her calm and focused on
    what she needed to do.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me
     
  18. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Cindy Fuller wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Puester <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>That was a nice thing you did. Now where's the recipe?
    >>

    >
    > Somehow I KNEW someone would ask. It's actually recipes. These are
    > from "The Noodle Shop Cookbook", by Jacki Passmore.
    >


    recipe snipped
    >
    > My young neighbor is a pretty accomplished cook already, courtesy of her
    > mother. She and a friend cooked the entire Thanksgiving dinner by
    > themselves last year. Last summer I taught her how to make blackberry
    > crisp. Most of what I did yesterday was keep her calm and focused on
    > what she needed to do.
    >
    > Cindy
    >




    Thanks.

    gloria p
     
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