Two questions today

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Paul D, Feb 20, 2006.

  1. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    Two topics, unrelated except they both occured to me whilst riding home from
    work today.

    Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which is
    currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are pretty
    worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?

    Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning nicely.
    However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs, although
    not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    to change?

    Ta in advance
     
    Tags:


  2. Jon is Away!

    Jon is Away! Guest

    Paul D wrote:
    > Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning nicely.
    > However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    > end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs, although
    > not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    > for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    > to change?


    The inability to freewheel (Is it fixed or singlespeed?), can mean that
    you'll be more sensitive to saddle position. It's not something I've
    noticed, but with odd exceptions I've not ridden my fixie more than 10
    miles in one go.

    If you're pushing hard at 120+ rpm, I offer my congratulations. I lose
    the ability to put significant power in at a bit less than that and
    tend to be more "Following the pedals and trying not to slow down." ;-)

    Jon
     
  3. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Paul D wrote:

    > not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    > for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    > to change?


    FSVO "unfit", but that's pretty hard work. Even pros get aches from
    time to time, and that's not because they're "unfit".

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Paul D wrote:

    > Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of
    > which is currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces
    > are pretty worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?


    No. That's the easy question. Next question I guess will be when to
    replace. I'll pass on that!

    ~PB
     
  5. Jon is Away!

    Jon is Away! Guest

    Pete Biggs wrote:
    > No. That's the easy question. Next question I guess will be when to
    > replace. I'll pass on that!


    Before a) you can see the inner tube.
    b) The sidewall detaches from the rest of the rim and rolls alongside
    you.

    Either would be bad.

    Jon
     
  6. sothach

    sothach Guest

    Paul D wrote:

    > Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning nicely.
    > However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    > end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs, although
    > not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    > for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    > to change?


    I'd look at the seat height / leg extension, I found after training in
    lower gears I needed to raise the seat a couple of cm's. I guess your
    legs muscles get better at extending, but I'm no Joe Beer (not with
    capitals, anyway). How do you find this gear ratio on hills? I'm
    building up a fixie with 39/15, which is close to your 42/16, but I'm a
    bit leary of the hills on my commute...
     
  7. M-gineering

    M-gineering Guest

    Paul D wrote:
    > Two topics, unrelated except they both occured to me whilst riding home from
    > work today.
    >
    > Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which is
    > currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are pretty
    > worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?
    >


    open pro's start out with 1.5 wall, and probably go bang at 0.6


    > Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning nicely.
    > However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    > end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs, although
    > not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    > for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    > to change?


    unfit, not enough to drink, or you should eat more banana's ;)


    --
    ---
    Marten Gerritsen

    INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
    www.m-gineering.nl
     
  8. Paul D wrote:

    > Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which is
    > currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are pretty
    > worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?


    No; I think CXP22s are the only Mavic 700c rims with a wear indicator.
    Does the braking surface feel as though it has a pronounced "half-moon"
    rather than flat profile all round the rim? If so, probably time for a
    rebuild.

    David Belcher
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    David E. Belcher wrote:
    >
    > I think CXP22s are the only Mavic 700c rims with a wear indicator.


    A719, Open Sport (replacement for MA3) and probably a few other new 700c
    models have wear indicators.

    ~PB
     
  10. Paul D wrote:

    > Two topics, unrelated except they both occured to me whilst riding home from
    > work today.
    >
    > Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which is
    > currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are pretty
    > worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?


    If there were, you'd be able to see them. They're usually small pits or
    a groove right round the rim. When these disappear, the rim has become
    too thin.

    > Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning nicely.
    > However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    > end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs, although
    > not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe 120rpm+
    > for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing wrong/able
    > to change?


    120rpm is too fast. Try a 14T sprocket if you really are spinning out
    the 16T; that would mean you were commuting at nearly 30mph, but you
    might be the bastard son of Jacques Anquetil and Beryl Burton for all I
    know ;-)
     
  11. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    "Jon is Away!" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Paul D wrote:
    >> Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning
    >> nicely.
    >> However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    >> end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs,
    >> although
    >> not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe
    >> 120rpm+
    >> for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing
    >> wrong/able
    >> to change?

    >
    > The inability to freewheel (Is it fixed or singlespeed?), can mean that
    > you'll be more sensitive to saddle position. It's not something I've
    > noticed, but with odd exceptions I've not ridden my fixie more than 10
    > miles in one go.
    >


    Its a flop flip hub so I've got a 16T track cog on side & a 16T BMX
    freewheel on the other. Probably 75% using the single speed (had a crash on
    ice whilst back pedalling on the fixie & a bit cautious using it in the cold
    wet mornings now). However, I'm well into the mindset of fixed riding, so I
    don't coast much on the SS, except on the long downhills.

    > If you're pushing hard at 120+ rpm, I offer my congratulations. I lose
    > the ability to put significant power in at a bit less than that and
    > tend to be more "Following the pedals and trying not to slow down." ;-)
    >
    > Jon
    >


    Having concentrated on getting a smoother circular pedal stroke for the last
    few months I can now go for a good few minutes at quite a high pace. What
    scares me is that moment on the fixed when you just lose the rhythm
    momentarilly at high speed and then find your legs out of time with the
    pedals...and the back wheel all over the place!

    I do find I subconsciously push harder using the singlespeed as I know I
    have a 'get out' freewheel, whereas I hold back a little from getting
    completely tatered on the fixed.
     
  12. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Tue, 21 Feb 2006 13:45:00 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >David E. Belcher wrote:
    >>
    >> I think CXP22s are the only Mavic 700c rims with a wear indicator.

    >
    >A719, Open Sport (replacement for MA3) and probably a few other new 700c
    >models have wear indicators.



    And in the case of the A719 at least,the wear indicators are hidden
    inside the wall (a small milled slot, which will get exposed as the
    outer wears).


    Tim
     
  13. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    "sothach" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Paul D wrote:
    >
    >> Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning
    >> nicely.
    >> However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and towards the
    >> end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both legs,
    >> although
    >> not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard at maybe
    >> 120rpm+
    >> for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might be doing
    >> wrong/able
    >> to change?

    >
    > I'd look at the seat height / leg extension, I found after training in
    > lower gears I needed to raise the seat a couple of cm's. I guess your
    > legs muscles get better at extending, but I'm no Joe Beer (not with
    > capitals, anyway). How do you find this gear ratio on hills? I'm
    > building up a fixie with 39/15, which is close to your 42/16, but I'm a
    > bit leary of the hills on my commute...
    >


    I actually read somewhere long ago that when starting out on a fixed after
    1000's miles on a freewheel, to lower the seat by up to 10mm to help avoid
    the 'bouncing' when spinning fast. I can't say I altered my seat at all, but
    my legs don't feel like they're stretching. Maybe that's the point, bad seat
    position but I've lived with it for so long I'm certain I'm right...hmmm.

    I choose 42x16 (71 inch) after messing around with my 9 spd bike in
    september, doing runs to work & back in one gear. It's a bit low for the
    flat and consequently I'm about 2-4 mins slower on it (single speed - slower
    still if I can't coast down the hills) than my geared bike over the 15 1/2
    miles to work, but it is do-able up all the hills on my commute and
    surrounding area (east dorset), which are mostly short and sharpish. I
    thought I might go for 78 inch at one point, but it really wasn't fun up the
    hills. I'm considering going to a 48 ring and changing the freewheel for an
    18T (a 72 inch gear & freewheeling downhill) and keeping the 16T fixed (81
    inch so I can go downhill faster, but uphills will be a struggle).
     
  14. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    "David E. Belcher" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Paul D wrote:
    >
    >> Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which
    >> is
    >> currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are pretty
    >> worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?

    >
    > No; I think CXP22s are the only Mavic 700c rims with a wear indicator.
    > Does the braking surface feel as though it has a pronounced "half-moon"
    > rather than flat profile all round the rim? If so, probably time for a
    > rebuild.
    >
    > David Belcher
    >


    Half moon - oh yes, hence me worrying a little. I think it's the end of the
    road for my trusty open pro's. Anybody want the pair (with 105 hubs) for a
    brakeless fixie for a few quid?!
     
  15. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    "Zog The Undeniable" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Paul D wrote:
    >
    >> Two topics, unrelated except they both occured to me whilst riding home
    >> from work today.
    >>
    >> Firstly, I've got a well used pair of open pro's, the front one of which
    >> is currently doing service on my commuter. The braking surfaces are
    >> pretty worn - do open pro's have wear indicators in the walls?

    >
    > If there were, you'd be able to see them. They're usually small pits or a
    > groove right round the rim. When these disappear, the rim has become too
    > thin.
    >
    >> Secondly, 42x16 on my fixed/singlespeed means i'm mastering spinning
    >> nicely. However, my commute is ~50mins/15 miles of said spinning, and
    >> towards the end I'm starting to get mild cramps in my calf muscles (both
    >> legs, although not necessarily at the same time) when pushing fairly hard
    >> at maybe 120rpm+ for minutes at a time. Unfit, or something else I might
    >> be doing wrong/able to change?

    >
    > 120rpm is too fast. Try a 14T sprocket if you really are spinning out the
    > 16T; that would mean you were commuting at nearly 30mph, but you might be
    > the bastard son of Jacques Anquetil and Beryl Burton for all I know ;-)


    Not pushing 120rpm all day long, but it equates to a bit over 25mph -
    perfectly feasable for downhills and some of the miles of flat I have to do.
    As detailed in an earlier post, I chose a 71 inch gear in order to get up
    the hills on my commute, sacrificing a bit of flat speed.
     
  16. Pete Biggs wrote:

    > David E. Belcher wrote:
    > >
    > > I think CXP22s are the only Mavic 700c rims with a wear indicator.

    >
    > A719, Open Sport (replacement for MA3) and probably a few other new 700c
    > models have wear indicators.
    >


    Thanks for that info, Pete - the products on the website seem to have
    changed since I was on there a couple of weeks ago (though usually 2006
    stuff seems to appear on makers' sites the *other* side of New Year)!

    David Belcher
     
  17. Jon is Away!

    Jon is Away! Guest

    Paul D wrote:
    > Half moon - oh yes, hence me worrying a little. I think it's the end of the
    > road for my trusty open pro's. Anybody want the pair (with 105 hubs) for a
    > brakeless fixie for a few quid?!


    Potentially interested for the hubs. Email to discuss. (I would email
    you, but I can't demunge your address with Google Groups!)

    Jon
     
  18. Jon is Away!

    Jon is Away! Guest

    Paul D wrote:
    > I choose 42x16 (71 inch) after messing around with my 9 spd bike in
    > september, doing runs to work & back in one gear. It's a bit low for the
    > flat and consequently I'm about 2-4 mins slower on it (single speed - slower
    > still if I can't coast down the hills) than my geared bike over the 15 1/2
    > miles to work, but it is do-able up all the hills on my commute and
    > surrounding area (east dorset), which are mostly short and sharpish. I
    > thought I might go for 78 inch at one point, but it really wasn't fun up the
    > hills. I'm considering going to a 48 ring and changing the freewheel for an
    > 18T (a 72 inch gear & freewheeling downhill) and keeping the 16T fixed (81
    > inch so I can go downhill faster, but uphills will be a struggle).


    I used to run 72" fixed in Edinburgh, but dropped down to 69" because
    my knees were getting sore after the climb home and I didn't fancy
    buggering up another joint (Bad wrists due to an excessive of
    climbing). Are your dropouts long enough to allow that variance in
    chain? If not, you might want to carry an extra link or two separately
    and use two magic links, thus allowing rapid chain length modification.

    Jon
     
  19. Paul D

    Paul D Guest

    "Jon is Away!" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Paul D wrote:
    >> I choose 42x16 (71 inch) after messing around with my 9 spd bike in
    >> september, doing runs to work & back in one gear. It's a bit low for the
    >> flat and consequently I'm about 2-4 mins slower on it (single speed -
    >> slower
    >> still if I can't coast down the hills) than my geared bike over the 15
    >> 1/2
    >> miles to work, but it is do-able up all the hills on my commute and
    >> surrounding area (east dorset), which are mostly short and sharpish. I
    >> thought I might go for 78 inch at one point, but it really wasn't fun up
    >> the
    >> hills. I'm considering going to a 48 ring and changing the freewheel for
    >> an
    >> 18T (a 72 inch gear & freewheeling downhill) and keeping the 16T fixed
    >> (81
    >> inch so I can go downhill faster, but uphills will be a struggle).

    >
    > I used to run 72" fixed in Edinburgh, but dropped down to 69" because
    > my knees were getting sore after the climb home and I didn't fancy
    > buggering up another joint (Bad wrists due to an excessive of
    > climbing). Are your dropouts long enough to allow that variance in
    > chain? If not, you might want to carry an extra link or two separately
    > and use two magic links, thus allowing rapid chain length modification.
    >
    > Jon
    >


    Yes, dropouts long enough, just.
     
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