Two sideviews of Armstrong in TT position

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Robert Chung, Feb 22, 2004.

  1. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

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  2. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

  3. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

  4. "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Ewoud Dronkert wrote:
    >> On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 09:05:59 +0100, Robert Chung wrote:
    >>> From last year's TdF (via cyclingnews.com):
    >>>
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos/2003/tour03/stage12/olympia/ARMSTRONG38
    > 15.jpg
    >>>
    >>> From this year's Volta ao Algarve (via velonews.com):
    >>> http://www.velonews.com/images/int/5594.6938.f.jpg
    >>
    >> See overlay on http://www.phys.uu.nl/~dronkert/cycling/la-tt.jpg
    >
    > Kraig Willett just put this up: http://www.biketechreview.com/misc/la_position.htm

    It should be noted that these two pictures are at different positions in LA's pedal stroke. This
    could easily result in the miniscule differences expressed in the animation.
     
  5. MrBob

    MrBob Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Robert Chung" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From last year's TdF (via cyclingnews.com):
    > http://www.cyclingnews.com/photos/2003/tour03/stage12/olympia/ARMSTRONG3815.jp g
    >
    > From this year's Volta ao Algarve (via velonews.com):
    > http://www.velonews.com/images/int/5594.6938.f.jpg

    Wow - return of 'Death Brakes' (Dura Ace AX, circa 1983). Cool looking, very aero, but awful
    stopping power. Though, not much stopping power necessary for a TT.

    MrBob

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  6. Jiyang Chen

    Jiyang Chen Guest

    "MrBob"
    >Though, not much stopping power necessary for a TT.

    ?????? Time trials are not run in straight lines.
     
  7. > "MrBob"
    > >Though, not much stopping power necessary for a TT.
    >
    > ?????? Time trials are not run in straight lines.

    Nor are time trials often run on hair-raising descents.

    If you think about it, hard braking is typically required in only two circumstances during a TT-

    #1: The unexpected. Could be caused by a crash ahead of you, or unexpected
    road conditions. In a time trial, you're either alone or only with a small number of riders, all
    from your own team. And unexpected road conditions should never be the case for top-caliber riders,
    who are going to check out the course ahead of time.

    #2: An *extremely* technical course. But even then a skilled rider is
    going to minimize the use of his brakes since, after all, that's burning up energy that will have to
    be made up afterward.

    If the course was so demanding and technical that it required extreme braking, I would think the
    advantages of cutting-edge aerodynamics probably wouldn't be an issue.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  8. Jiyang Chen

    Jiyang Chen Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]...
    > > "MrBob"
    > > >Though, not much stopping power necessary for a TT.
    > >
    > > ?????? Time trials are not run in straight lines.
    >
    > Nor are time trials often run on hair-raising descents.
    >
    > If you think about it, hard braking is typically required in only two circumstances during a TT-
    >
    > #1: The unexpected. Could be caused by a crash ahead of you, or
    unexpected
    > road conditions. In a time trial, you're either alone or only with a
    small
    > number of riders, all from your own team. And unexpected road
    conditions
    > should never be the case for top-caliber riders, who are going to
    check out
    > the course ahead of time.
    >
    > #2: An *extremely* technical course. But even then a skilled rider
    is
    > going to minimize the use of his brakes since, after all, that's
    burning up
    > energy that will have to be made up afterward.
    >
    > If the course was so demanding and technical that it required extreme braking, I would think the
    > advantages of cutting-edge aerodynamics
    probably
    > wouldn't be an issue.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >

    Thx for the info.
     
  9. On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 05:39:47 GMT, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> "MrBob"
    >> >Though, not much stopping power necessary for a TT.
    >>
    >> ?????? Time trials are not run in straight lines.
    >
    >Nor are time trials often run on hair-raising descents.
    >
    >If you think about it, hard braking is typically required in only two circumstances during a TT-
    >
    >#1: The unexpected. Could be caused by a crash ahead of you, or unexpected
    >road conditions. In a time trial, you're either alone or only with a small number of riders, all
    >from your own team. And unexpected road conditions should never be the case for top-caliber riders,
    >who are going to check out the course ahead of time.
    >
    >#2: An *extremely* technical course. But even then a skilled rider is
    >going to minimize the use of his brakes since, after all, that's burning up energy that will have
    >to be made up afterward.

    I saw some tapes of the Tour of Italy (around the time Rominger won
    it) and there were scary descents (one in which both Gontchar and Leblanc crashed) and a lot of
    narrow 90 degree corners in them at the starts.

    And I've done pleny of local and regional level time trials in which hard braking is required at
    turnarounds.

    JT
     
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