Type II and Blood pressure question

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by jamesbath, Apr 12, 2004.

  1. jamesbath

    jamesbath Guest

    I have noticed a correlation between my wife's blood sugar
    and her blood pressure. I want to know if anyone else has
    observed the following phenomena. The first thing I do
    every morning is take her blood pressure. Then I read her
    glucose level. I've noticed over many months of checking
    that when her blood pressure is high, at around 160
    systolic, her glucose level is low in the mid 80's and
    sometimes high 70's. At this point, I give her an Ensure
    which has 19 GM of sugar. Minutes later her BP drops 20
    points as her glucose goes up to around 100. I mentioned
    this to her last young doctor, and she made light of it,
    saying that there could be no such correlation. But I've
    seen it happen enough to know there is.

    Has anyone experienced this sort of thing?

    --

    James H. Bath http://www.geocities.com/jimbath1/

    Love is a gift; a gift you can only have by giving it away.
     
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  2. Ladysycamore

    Ladysycamore Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I have noticed a correlation between my wife's blood sugar
    > and her blood pressure. I want to know if anyone else has
    > observed the following phenomena. The first thing I do
    > every morning is take her blood pressure. Then I read her
    > glucose level. I've noticed over many months of checking
    > that when her blood pressure is high, at around 160
    > systolic, her glucose level is low in the mid 80's and
    > sometimes high 70's. At this point, I give her an Ensure
    > which has 19 GM of sugar. Minutes later her BP drops 20
    > points as her glucose goes up to around 100. I mentioned
    > this to her last young doctor, and she made light of it,
    > saying that there could be no such correlation. But I've
    > seen it happen enough to know there is.
    >
    > Has anyone experienced this sort of thing?
    >

    Can't say that I have, but I haven't been keeping such a
    close eye on my pressure and glucose (at the same time). My
    pressure tends to go up or down according to how much I am
    dialyzing (I'm on peritoneal dialysis), so I am probably not
    a good example of this.

    However, do some research (if you can) online, and if you
    find anything, print it out (or take good notes) and then
    show it to your doctor. I hate it when doctors don't want to
    even consider the possibilities of certain things.

    Good luck.

    --
    ~LadySycamore~ Co-Administrator dialyze.org: For renal
    patients by renal patients
    http://dialyze.org/forums/index.php

    El Ciberbosque: "Sycamore's next step in the quest for world
    domination" http://www.ciberbosque.org/index.php
     
  3. jamesbath

    jamesbath Guest

    Thanks for the reply. I'll keep snooping. And I wish you the
    best of luck with your continued health progress.

    --

    James H. Bath http://www.geocities.com/jimbath1/

    Love is a gift; a gift you can only have by giving it away.

    "LadySycamore" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:eek:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > I have noticed a correlation between my wife's blood
    > > sugar and her blood pressure. I want to know if anyone
    > > else has observed the following phenomena. The first
    > > thing I do every morning is take her blood
    pressure.
    > > Then I read her glucose level. I've noticed over many
    > > months of
    checking
    > > that when her blood pressure is high, at around 160
    > > systolic, her
    glucose
    > > level is low in the mid 80's and sometimes high 70's. At
    > > this point, I
    give
    > > her an Ensure which has 19 GM of sugar. Minutes later
    > > her BP drops 20 points as her glucose goes up to around
    > > 100. I mentioned this to her
    last
    > > young doctor, and she made light of it, saying that
    > > there could be no
    such
    > > correlation. But I've seen it happen enough to know
    > > there is.
    > >
    > > Has anyone experienced this sort of thing?
    > >
    >
    > Can't say that I have, but I haven't been keeping such a
    > close eye on my pressure and glucose (at the same time).
    > My pressure tends to go up or down according to how much I
    > am dialyzing (I'm on peritoneal dialysis), so I am
    > probably not a good example of this.
    >
    > However, do some research (if you can) online, and if you
    > find anything, print it out (or take good notes) and then
    > show it to your doctor. I hate it when doctors don't want
    > to even consider the possibilities of certain things.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >
    > --
    > ~LadySycamore~ Co-Administrator dialyze.org: For renal
    > patients by renal patients
    > http://dialyze.org/forums/index.php
    >
    > El Ciberbosque: "Sycamore's next step in the quest for
    > world domination" http://www.ciberbosque.org/index.php
     
  4. Cledus

    Cledus Guest

    Your observations are opposite to what I would expect. Blood
    is thicker when the bg is high. It is much thinner when bg
    is low. So my expectation would be that blood pressure would
    be higher with high bg because the thickness is greater. Not
    an expert opinion - just a personal theory.

    On the other hand, I have noticed that my wife gets very
    pale when her bg is low. This may indicate that blood
    pressure is too low. Again, just a theory - not an informed,
    expert opinion.

    Anyway, I believe that it is reasonable that one might
    observe a relationship between blood pressure and bg levels.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks for the reply. I'll keep snooping. And I wish you
    > the best of
    luck
    > with your continued health progress.
    >
    > --
    >
    > James H. Bath http://www.geocities.com/jimbath1/
    >
    > Love is a gift; a gift you can only have by giving
    > it away.
    >
    >
    >
    > "LadySycamore" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:eek:[email protected]
    > thlink.net...
    > > [email protected] wrote:
    > >
    > > > I have noticed a correlation between my wife's blood
    > > > sugar and her
    blood
    > > > pressure. I want to know if anyone else has observed
    > > > the following phenomena. The first thing I do every
    > > > morning is take her blood
    > pressure.
    > > > Then I read her glucose level. I've noticed over many
    > > > months of
    > checking
    > > > that when her blood pressure is high, at around 160
    > > > systolic, her
    > glucose
    > > > level is low in the mid 80's and sometimes high 70's.
    > > > At this point,
    I
    > give
    > > > her an Ensure which has 19 GM of sugar. Minutes later
    > > > her BP drops 20 points as her glucose goes up to
    > > > around 100. I mentioned this to her
    > last
    > > > young doctor, and she made light of it, saying that
    > > > there could be no
    > such
    > > > correlation. But I've seen it happen enough to know
    > > > there is.
    > > >
    > > > Has anyone experienced this sort of thing?
    > > >
    > >
    > > Can't say that I have, but I haven't been keeping such a
    > > close eye on my pressure and glucose (at the same time).
    > > My pressure tends to go up or down according to how much
    > > I am dialyzing (I'm on peritoneal dialysis), so I am
    > > probably not a good example of this.
    > >
    > > However, do some research (if you can) online, and if
    > > you find anything, print it out (or take good notes) and
    > > then show it to your doctor. I hate it when doctors
    > > don't want to even consider the possibilities of certain
    > > things.
    > >
    > > Good luck.
    > >
    > > --
    > > ~LadySycamore~ Co-Administrator dialyze.org: For renal
    > > patients by renal patients
    > > http://dialyze.org/forums/index.php
    > >
    > > El Ciberbosque: "Sycamore's next step in the quest for
    > > world domination" http://www.ciberbosque.org/index.php
    > >
    >
     
  5. jamesbath

    jamesbath Guest

    One theory I've come up with to account for the blood
    pressure going up as the glucose goes down is this: her body
    is demanding an elevated amount of glucose and other
    nutrients in order to fuel the healing process going on in
    her feet. She has pressure wounds in her heels (ulcerations)
    which she contracted in the hospital some months back. I
    read somewhere that the body requires 50 to 100 times the
    normal blood flow through a wound site, in order to get the
    materials to the site for rebuilding the tissue and to take
    away the waste products such as carbon dioxide and dead
    cells. Obviously, with such a stepped-up bio-manufacturing
    process underway, glucose as fuel will be needed in much
    greater than normal supplies.

    And here's the rub, if you will. If there is not enough
    glucose per volume of blood, the wound site is going to be
    crying for more blood. In other words, if the blood is well
    saturated with the nutrients the wound needs, then the blood
    flow through the area can be at a slower (less pressurized)
    pace than if the blood is deficient of the needed chemicals,
    in which case a lot of blood would have to pass through, in
    the same amount of time, to deliver the same amount of
    nutrients.

    --

    James H. Bath http://www.geocities.com/jimbath1/

    Love is a gift; a gift you can only have by giving it away.

    "cledus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Your observations are opposite to what I would expect.
    > Blood is thicker when the bg is high. It is much thinner
    > when bg is low. So my
    expectation
    > would be that blood pressure would be higher with high bg
    > because the thickness is greater. Not an expert opinion -
    > just a personal theory.
    >
    > On the other hand, I have noticed that my wife gets very
    > pale when her bg
    is
    > low. This may indicate that blood pressure is too low.
    > Again, just a theory - not an informed, expert opinion.
    >
    > Anyway, I believe that it is reasonable that one
    > might observe a relationship between blood pressure
    > and bg levels.
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Thanks for the reply. I'll keep snooping. And I wish you
    > > the best of
    > luck
    > > with your continued health progress.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > James H. Bath http://www.geocities.com/jimbath1/
    > >
    > > Love is a gift; a gift you can only have by giving
    > > it away.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "LadySycamore" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:eek:[email protected]
    > > thlink.net...
    > > > [email protected] wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > I have noticed a correlation between my wife's blood
    > > > > sugar and her
    > blood
    > > > > pressure. I want to know if anyone else has observed
    > > > > the following phenomena. The first thing I do every
    > > > > morning is take her blood
    > > pressure.
    > > > > Then I read her glucose level. I've noticed over
    > > > > many months of
    > > checking
    > > > > that when her blood pressure is high, at around 160
    > > > > systolic, her
    > > glucose
    > > > > level is low in the mid 80's and sometimes high
    > > > > 70's. At this
    point,
    > I
    > > give
    > > > > her an Ensure which has 19 GM of sugar. Minutes
    > > > > later her BP drops
    20
    > > > > points as her glucose goes up to around 100. I
    > > > > mentioned this to
    her
    > > last
    > > > > young doctor, and she made light of it, saying that
    > > > > there could be
    no
    > > such
    > > > > correlation. But I've seen it happen enough to know
    > > > > there is.
    > > > >
    > > > > Has anyone experienced this sort of thing?
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Can't say that I have, but I haven't been keeping such
    > > > a close eye on
    my
    > > > pressure and glucose (at the same time). My pressure
    > > > tends to go up or down according to how much I am
    > > > dialyzing (I'm on peritoneal
    dialysis),
    > > > so I am probably not a good example of this.
    > > >
    > > > However, do some research (if you can) online, and if
    > > > you find
    anything,
    > > > print it out (or take good notes) and then show it to
    > > > your doctor. I hate it when doctors don't want to even
    > > > consider the possibilities of certain things.
    > > >
    > > > Good luck.
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > ~LadySycamore~ Co-Administrator dialyze.org: For renal
    > > > patients by renal patients
    > > > http://dialyze.org/forums/index.php
    > > >
    > > > El Ciberbosque: "Sycamore's next step in the quest for
    > > > world domination" http://www.ciberbosque.org/index.php
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    >
     
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