Typical Cyclists?



T

Tosspot

Guest
Tony B wrote:
> Discovery out on a stealth training run...
>
> http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=7a4_1173478371


Streuth, if I was one of those people on that crossing, I might well
have been tempted to make a "citizens arrest". That was madness. You
think of the moral outrage on this ng is a car had attempted the same stunt.

There's progress through traffic, but thats taking the ****.
 
J

John Hearns

Guest
soup wrote:
>
>
> ARRGGH again with the supernumery l
> http://www.digave.com/videos/how.htm
>

It is not supernumary.
HTML = hyperext markup language
followed on from SGML

Eight plus three characted dot-separated file names are from DOS. Not
every operating system has this restriction, or convention.
 
S

soup

Guest
John Hearns wrote:

> It is not supernumary.
> HTML = hyperext markup language
> followed on from SGML


Thanks for the lesson on what HTML stands for, however to get that
link to work (Firefox on WinXP)properly the "l" should be removed so the
link ends in htm not html the one with html doesn't work.
I replied in "Driver uses her car as a weapon, Deptford" with the
html ending link then 30secs later I posted again saying the link was
wrong and it should end in htm , posted that link in here used the html
ending so posted again and said "ARRGGH again with the supernumerary l"
perhaps supernumerary was the wrong word to use the again was referring
to mucking up previously in the "Driver uses her car as a weapon,
Deptford" thread.

--
www.cheesesoup.myby.co.uk
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, soup
('[email protected]') wrote:

> John Hearns wrote:
>
>> It is not supernumary.
>> HTML = hyperext markup language
>> followed on from SGML

>
> Thanks for the lesson on what HTML stands for, however to get that
> link to work (Firefox on WinXP)properly the "l" should be removed so the
> link ends in htm not html the one with html doesn't work.


Because Microsoft are still tied to an operating system written in the late
nineteen seventies for very primitive eight bit computers which stored the
file 'extension' - essentially file type information - in three bytes.

The world has moved on, but trust Microsoft to be stuck in the past.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

Morning had broken, and we had run out of gas for the welding torch.
 
O

OG

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <[email protected]>, soup
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>> John Hearns wrote:
>>
>>> It is not supernumary.
>>> HTML = hyperext markup language
>>> followed on from SGML

>>
>> Thanks for the lesson on what HTML stands for, however to get that
>> link to work (Firefox on WinXP)properly the "l" should be removed so the
>> link ends in htm not html the one with html doesn't work.

>
> Because Microsoft are still tied to an operating system written in the
> late
> nineteen seventies for very primitive eight bit computers which stored the
> file 'extension' - essentially file type information - in three bytes.
>
> The world has moved on, but trust Microsoft to be stuck in the past.


Neither true nor relevant.

But mainly - if you are directing the browser to a file called abc.html you
won't find it if it is actually called abc.htm.
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, OG
('[email protected]') wrote:

>
> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> in message <[email protected]>, soup
>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>>
>>> John Hearns wrote:
>>>
>>>> It is not supernumary.
>>>> HTML = hyperext markup language
>>>> followed on from SGML
>>>
>>> Thanks for the lesson on what HTML stands for, however to get that
>>> link to work (Firefox on WinXP)properly the "l" should be removed so
>>> the link ends in htm not html the one with html doesn't work.

>>
>> Because Microsoft are still tied to an operating system written in the
>> late
>> nineteen seventies for very primitive eight bit computers which stored
>> the file 'extension' - essentially file type information - in three
>> bytes.
>>
>> The world has moved on, but trust Microsoft to be stuck in the past.

>
> Neither true nor relevant.
>
> But mainly - if you are directing the browser to a file called abc.html
> you won't find it if it is actually called abc.htm.


You don't direct your browser to a file, you direct it to a Uniform
Resource Locator. The server maps the locator onto a resource, and returns
you the output of that resource. You don't know, and don't need to know,
how that mapping worked. If I, for example, direct you to the URL
http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/story/article_57.html

does that imply there's a file somewhere on my server called
article_57.html? The answer may become more perspicuous if you note that
the URL
http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/story?article=57

returns exactly the same thing. And if you then note that the URL
http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/nitf?article=57

returns the same content in a different format, you may get some idea of
what is going on.

So - in summary - the URL need have nothing whatever to do with a file name
(there is, in this case, no file as such at all). I on the whole
deplore 'filename extensions', particularly as a way of indicating the
content of the file. But 'HTML' at least means something. 'HTM' merely
means 'we're incompetent, and too ignorant to even know it'.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

X-no-archive: No, I'm not *that* naive.
 
O

OG

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> in message <[email protected]>, OG
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>>
>> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> in message <[email protected]>, soup
>>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>>>
>>>> John Hearns wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> It is not supernumary.
>>>>> HTML = hyperext markup language
>>>>> followed on from SGML
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for the lesson on what HTML stands for, however to get that
>>>> link to work (Firefox on WinXP)properly the "l" should be removed so
>>>> the link ends in htm not html the one with html doesn't work.
>>>
>>> Because Microsoft are still tied to an operating system written in the
>>> late
>>> nineteen seventies for very primitive eight bit computers which stored
>>> the file 'extension' - essentially file type information - in three
>>> bytes.
>>>
>>> The world has moved on, but trust Microsoft to be stuck in the past.

>>
>> Neither true nor relevant.
>>
>> But mainly - if you are directing the browser to a file called abc.html
>> you won't find it if it is actually called abc.htm.

>
> You don't direct your browser to a file, you direct it to a Uniform
> Resource Locator. The server maps the locator onto a resource, and returns
> you the output of that resource. You don't know, and don't need to know,
> how that mapping worked. If I, for example, direct you to the URL
> http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/story/article_57.html
>
> does that imply there's a file somewhere on my server called
> article_57.html? The answer may become more perspicuous if you note that
> the URL
> http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/story?article=57
>
> returns exactly the same thing. And if you then note that the URL
> http://www.jasmine.org.uk/dogfood/nitf?article=57
>
> returns the same content in a different format, you may get some idea of
> what is going on.
>
> So - in summary - the URL need have nothing whatever to do with a file
> name
> (there is, in this case, no file as such at all). I on the whole
> deplore 'filename extensions', particularly as a way of indicating the
> content of the file. But 'HTML' at least means something. 'HTM' merely
> means 'we're incompetent, and too ignorant to even know it'.
>
> --
> [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
>
> X-no-archive: No, I'm not *that* naive.


Thanks for the thumbnail.