Typical spending by bicycle tourists



Status
Not open for further replies.
B

Brent Hugh

Guest
Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per day,
per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.

Do any of you know any good research in this area?

Below is what a quick google search picked up, just FYI:

http://elena.aut.ac.nz/homepages/staff/Tony-Bewlay/can/home/articles/aussie_touring.html

Research by Tourism Victoria has shown (Hopkins 1999), backpacker tourists (of which cycle tourists
are a subset) spend less per day - about Aus$59 (US$36) - than the average overseas tourist, but
stay longer and thus tend to spend about double the average per capita.

According to data from Bicycle Victoria's Great Rides and the Bicycle Institute of NSW's Big Ride,
local cycle tourists spend about this amount per day, too. The spending of cycle tourists tends to
be of kinds that have high multiplier effects, estimated at around 2.6 by the Bureau of Resource
Economics, in local economy and employment.

------

http://www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/focus/walk_to_money.pdf

Tourists coming to Vermont to walk and bicycle in the scenic, human- scale towns and compact,
pedestrian-friendly town centers have proved to be an economic boon. In 1992, an estimated 32,500
visiting cyclists spent $13.1 million in Vermont about twice the amount of money generated by
Vermont's maple syrup producers in a good year.

Source: Bicycle Touring in Vermont and Vermont's Scenic Byways Program, Bruce Burgess for the
Vermont Agency of Transportation, 1995

----

http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/resources/08_0538.pdf

Average UK expenditure was £146 (US$232) per trip, or £30-35 ($48-56) per night. (Source: Sustrans
Cycle Tourism Information Pack TT21,
1998).

VTCC Stepping Out brochure evaluation (2000) indicated Victorian trip spending of between Aus$200
(US$123) and Aus$1200 (US$740), and average Aus$400-Aus$500 (US$247-US$308) per trip.

------

Here is contact info for Sustrans:

"Sustrans publishes a comprehensive guide to standards for the construction of the National Cycling
network. They live at 35 King Street Bristol. Tel. 01179 268893

"Website www.sustrans.org.uk

"Sustrans also produce a very good information pack (number TT21) explaining the possibilities and
benefits of developing tourism called, logically enough 'Cycle Tourism'."

----------------------

Brent Hugh/bhugh @ mwsc.edu

+++++++++++++++++ Brent Hugh / bhugh @ mwsc.edu +++++++++++++++
+ Missouri Western St College Dept of Music, St. Joseph, MO +
+ Piano Home Page : http://staff.mwsc.edu/~bhugh +
+ Music IQ Songs : http://mp3.com/MusicIQ + ++ Music of the Human Genome :
http://mp3.com/brent_d_hugh ++++
 
K

Ken

Guest
[email protected] (Brent Hugh) wrote in news:[email protected]:

> Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.

As with any category of tourist, the range is huge. Luxury bicycle tour outfitters like Butterfield
& Robinson charge upwards of US$400 per day. These kinds of tours cater to middle aged folks who
have extra spending money and like eating gourmet meals and sleeping in 4 star hotels, but also like
the slow pace and outdoors experience of touring by bicycle.
 
R

Robert J. Matte

Guest
Brent Hugh wrote:
>
> Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
> Do any of you know any good research in this area?

A few years back I tracked my bike touring spending for an Indiana trails group. I spent about
$100/day when staying at motels. Staying at a state park campground instead of a motel could shave
$25-$30/day from that.

It's not to hard to work out. Motels are more expensive on weekends. Even cheap motels like Motel 6
and Super 8 bump up their rates to the $40-$45/night range on Fridays and Saturdays. So with the
various hotel taxes figure about $45-$50/night for lodging.

Eating 2-3 meals out per day can tack on another $25-$30/day if you eat well and tip well at decent
independent restaurants, not fast food chains. I always prefer to eat at independent restaurants
with specialties I find out about from locals.

Often in the evenings I would go to a movie or a play. Tack on $10/day for entertainment.

Then there is incidental spending on things I forgot to bring or ran out of like batteries, mosquito
repellent, sun screen, firewood if staying at a campground, etc. I like to pick up a daily newspaper
and I never pass up an ice cream stand or gourmet coffee shop. Sometimes you have to buy a trail
pass. So add in another $5-$10/day for sundries.

I would usually pick up souvenirs for myself and family members. Often a T-shirt or two with the
nearest university's logo and some local specialty products. I also like to indulge a couple other
hobbies of mine while touring and stop at used/new bookstores and record stores. Add in another
$10-$15/day for gifts/souvenirs/shopping.

Bikes mean business! (TM)

-Bob Matter
-----------
"No national railway of a developed country has ever run a profit. They're not supposed to. The
correlative economic and social benefits they throw off -- bringing commuters to taxpaying
corporations daily, for one thing -- more than offset any net loss they suffer."
-- Stephen B. Goddard
 
J

Jeremy Parker

Guest
> omeone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
It would definitely be worth while contacting Sustrans in the UK <www.sustrans.org.uk> who, I think,
have done quite a lot of research. I vaguely recall some research from Scotland which said that
cyclists do spend quite a lot of money, but some people don't like them because they only stay
overnight, unlike some other kinds of tourists, golfers, for example, who stay for a whole week.

Jeremy Parker
 
N

Nyrides

Guest
If they're trying to prove that touring cyclists provide any great economic benefits to the
communities we choose to visit, I'm not sure they'll be happy with the results.

When I tour, I spend between $65-100(US) on a hotel room (avg. $75) and MAYBE $20 a day on food.
Because I can't carry a whole lot on the bike, I don't purchase any souvenirs. And because I don't
like to travel far from the hotel once I've gotten off the bike for the day, I don't do a whole lot
of tourist stuff.

When I travel with my wife, by car, it's the same (or a little more) for the hotel room, but we'll
go out to lunch ($30) and dinner ($50-60 or more) and spend a few dollars visiting tourist
attractions, etc.

I think the beauty of touring, especially solo, is that it can be so inexpensive, especially if you
eat dinner at the gas station next to your Super 8 Motel!

--
Low-Impact Rides in the NY/LI region www.geocities.com/NYRides "Brent Hugh" <[email protected]> wrote
in message news:[email protected]...
> Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
> Do any of you know any good research in this area?
>
>
> Below is what a quick google search picked up, just FYI:
>
>
http://elena.aut.ac.nz/homepages/staff/Tony-Bewlay/can/home/articles/aussie_ touring.html
>
> Research by Tourism Victoria has shown (Hopkins 1999), backpacker tourists (of which cycle
> tourists are a subset) spend less per day - about Aus$59 (US$36) - than the average overseas
> tourist, but stay longer and thus tend to spend about double the average per capita.
>
> According to data from Bicycle Victoria's Great Rides and the Bicycle Institute of NSW's Big Ride,
> local cycle tourists spend about this amount per day, too. The spending of cycle tourists tends to
> be of kinds that have high multiplier effects, estimated at around 2.6 by the Bureau of Resource
> Economics, in local economy and employment.
>
> ------
>
> http://www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/focus/walk_to_money.pdf
>
> Tourists coming to Vermont to walk and bicycle in the scenic, human- scale towns and compact,
> pedestrian-friendly town centers have proved to be an economic boon. In 1992, an estimated 32,500
> visiting cyclists spent $13.1 million in Vermont about twice the amount of money generated by
> Vermont's maple syrup producers in a good year.
>
> Source: Bicycle Touring in Vermont and Vermont's Scenic Byways Program, Bruce Burgess for the
> Vermont Agency of Transportation, 1995
>
> ----
>
> http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/resources/08_0538.pdf
>
> Average UK expenditure was £146 (US$232) per trip, or £30-35 ($48-56) per night. (Source: Sustrans
> Cycle Tourism Information Pack TT21,
> 1998).
>
> VTCC Stepping Out brochure evaluation (2000) indicated Victorian trip spending of between Aus$200
> (US$123) and Aus$1200 (US$740), and average Aus$400-Aus$500 (US$247-US$308) per trip.
>
> ------
>
> Here is contact info for Sustrans:
>
> "Sustrans publishes a comprehensive guide to standards for the construction of the National
> Cycling network. They live at 35 King Street Bristol. Tel. 01179 268893
>
> "Website www.sustrans.org.uk
>
> "Sustrans also produce a very good information pack (number TT21) explaining the possibilities and
> benefits of developing tourism called, logically enough 'Cycle Tourism'."
>
>
> ----------------------
>
>
> Brent Hugh/bhugh @ mwsc.edu
>
> +++++++++++++++++ Brent Hugh / bhugh @ mwsc.edu +++++++++++++++
> + Missouri Western St College Dept of Music, St. Joseph, MO +
> + Piano Home Page : http://staff.mwsc.edu/~bhugh +
> + Music IQ Songs : http://mp3.com/MusicIQ + ++ Music of the Human Genome :
> http://mp3.com/brent_d_hugh ++++
 
G

Gary Smiley

Guest
On my tour in Europe last june (see http://biketour.garysmiley.com ) I averaged around $60/day.
Stayed in cheap hotels ($30-40) or hostels ($12/day). Ate the continental breakfast at the hotel,
grabbed a sandwich for lunch, had lots of pastries everywhere, but always sat down and had a good
meal every evening (better than most food in the US). Just thinking about makes me want to go back!
But I hear the exchange rate is not so good this year.

Brent Hugh wrote:

> Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
> Do any of you know any good research in this area?
>
> Below is what a quick google search picked up, just FYI:
>
> http://elena.aut.ac.nz/homepages/staff/Tony-Bewlay/can/home/articles/aussie_touring.html
>
> Research by Tourism Victoria has shown (Hopkins 1999), backpacker tourists (of which cycle
> tourists are a subset) spend less per day - about Aus$59 (US$36) - than the average overseas
> tourist, but stay longer and thus tend to spend about double the average per capita.
>
> According to data from Bicycle Victoria's Great Rides and the Bicycle Institute of NSW's Big Ride,
> local cycle tourists spend about this amount per day, too. The spending of cycle tourists tends to
> be of kinds that have high multiplier effects, estimated at around 2.6 by the Bureau of Resource
> Economics, in local economy and employment.
>
> ------
>
> http://www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/focus/walk_to_money.pdf
>
> Tourists coming to Vermont to walk and bicycle in the scenic, human- scale towns and compact,
> pedestrian-friendly town centers have proved to be an economic boon. In 1992, an estimated 32,500
> visiting cyclists spent $13.1 million in Vermont about twice the amount of money generated by
> Vermont's maple syrup producers in a good year.
>
> Source: Bicycle Touring in Vermont and Vermont's Scenic Byways Program, Bruce Burgess for the
> Vermont Agency of Transportation, 1995
>
> ----
>
> http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/resources/08_0538.pdf
>
> Average UK expenditure was £146 (US$232) per trip, or £30-35 ($48-56) per night. (Source: Sustrans
> Cycle Tourism Information Pack TT21,
> 1998).
>
> VTCC Stepping Out brochure evaluation (2000) indicated Victorian trip spending of between Aus$200
> (US$123) and Aus$1200 (US$740), and average Aus$400-Aus$500 (US$247-US$308) per trip.
>
> ------
>
> Here is contact info for Sustrans:
>
> "Sustrans publishes a comprehensive guide to standards for the construction of the National
> Cycling network. They live at 35 King Street Bristol. Tel. 01179 268893
>
> "Website www.sustrans.org.uk
>
> "Sustrans also produce a very good information pack (number TT21) explaining the possibilities and
> benefits of developing tourism called, logically enough 'Cycle Tourism'."
>
> ----------------------
>
> Brent Hugh/bhugh @ mwsc.edu
>
> +++++++++++++++++ Brent Hugh / bhugh @ mwsc.edu +++++++++++++++
> + Missouri Western St College Dept of Music, St. Joseph, MO +
> + Piano Home Page : http://staff.mwsc.edu/~bhugh +
> + Music IQ Songs : http://mp3.com/MusicIQ + ++ Music of the Human Genome :
> http://mp3.com/brent_d_hugh ++++
 
K

Karen M.

Guest
Brent wrote :
> Someone from our state division of tourism [in Missouri, I'm guessing] was asking about research
> into average spending (per day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
> Do any of you know any good research in this area?
...

Search by area and trail or tour name to get some good numers. Sparta-Elroy Trail (WI) has data
posted on-line (I used it for an economic development class last year). I think these are
provided by the state. Katy Trail may also have something. GOBA (Ohio) has surveyed their 3300
riders as to actual dollars spent. This is a camping trip with baggage sag and local service orgs
providing meal stops (sometimes at highway robber prices; $2 for PB&J??). There are some motel
pansies riding as well. Catered private tours might have data they can share. Usually they charge
premium prices for providing hotel reservations, sag service, sumptuous picnic lunches, and the
rest, so their clients are on the upper end of the income bell-shaped curve. But there's also
college kids spending the summer riding self-contained; they might not spend $50/day on lodging
and $30/day on meals. Their impact will be more on local grocery stores. If you find interesting
stuff outside of replies herein, please share! --Karen M.
 
D

Dennis P. Harri

Guest
On Wed, 05 Mar 2003 14:28:49 GMT in rec.bicycles.misc, "NYRides" <[email protected]> wrote:

> I think the beauty of touring, especially solo, is that it can be so inexpensive, especially if
> you eat dinner at the gas station next to your Super 8 Motel!

it can be even cheaper when you stay in a youth hostel (still under $20/night most places).
 
A

Alan

Guest
This is from a West Virginia article on trails:

. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT The vast number of trails and the variety of settings in West Virginia
provide the basis for an outstanding statewide trail system. However, enhanced efforts to link
individual facilities into a cohesive trail network are needed. When coupled with an aggressive
marketing campaign, there can be little doubt that the state can substantially increase the number
of out-of-state visitors drawn to a well-planned trail system. In addition to the general
financial gains resulting from increased tourist visitation, other economic benefits associated
with trail development include enhanced property values and increased local and state tax
revenues. Studies conducted in recent years include the following relevant examples:

. The Impact of Rail Trails; Rivers, Trails, and Conservation Assistance Program of the National
Park Service, Washington D.C., 1992. This study of users on three rail-trail projects found that
users spent an average of $3.97 to $11.02 per day, generating an annual impact of $1.2 million or
more on each trail. The survey documented that local users and visitors also spend as much as $250
per year on trail-related equipment, clothing, books and accessories. The trails attracted
spending by non-county residents ranging from $294,000 to $630,000 each year.

. A Look at Visitors on Wisconsin's Elroy-Sparta Bike Trail; University of Wisconsin Extension
Service, Madison Wisconsin, 1988. Semi-primitive and rural trails with historic or natural
characteristics that encourage "vacation-style" trips were found to generate more revenue per mile
than urban and suburban trails used for light recreation and commuting. The study by the
University of Wisconsin's Extension Service found that spending by out-of-state visitors for
lodging, bike rentals, bus shuttle service and restaurant meals was twice as high as for in-state
visitors. A survey of trail users in Minnesota found that users who traveled 25 miles or less to
the trail spent an average of just $.61 to $2.68 per day, while those traveling 25 miles or more
spent up to $53.20 per day on average.

. The Effect of the Burke-Gilman Trail Upon Property Values of Adjacent and Nearby Properties and
Upon the Property Crime Rate in the Vicinity of the Trail; The Seattle Engineering Department,
Seattle Washington, 1986. A survey of real estate agents conducted for this study revealed that
properties located within two blocks of the trail were easier to sell and carried a price premium
of about 6.2%. A survey of homeowners found that 75% of owners along the trail felt their homes
would be easier to sell and 48% expected a value premium. Only 4% of homeowners felt their homes
would sell for less. Crime and other problems along the trail were reported to be minimal to
nonexistent. No respondents felt the trail should be closed. Each of these studies indicates that
substantial economic benefits result from trail development. From increasing revenue in rural
communities to boosting property values, trails are a proven economic resource.

--

alan

Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

"Brent Hugh" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Someone from our state division of tourism was asking about research into average spending (per
> day, per trip, etc.) by bicycle tourists.
>
> Do any of you know any good research in this area?
>
>
> Below is what a quick google search picked up, just FYI:
>
>
http://elena.aut.ac.nz/homepages/staff/Tony-Bewlay/can/home/articles/aussie_ touring.html
>
> Research by Tourism Victoria has shown (Hopkins 1999), backpacker tourists (of which cycle
> tourists are a subset) spend less per day - about Aus$59 (US$36) - than the average overseas
> tourist, but stay longer and thus tend to spend about double the average per capita.
>
> According to data from Bicycle Victoria's Great Rides and the Bicycle Institute of NSW's Big Ride,
> local cycle tourists spend about this amount per day, too. The spending of cycle tourists tends to
> be of kinds that have high multiplier effects, estimated at around 2.6 by the Bureau of Resource
> Economics, in local economy and employment.
>
> ------
>
> http://www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/focus/walk_to_money.pdf
>
> Tourists coming to Vermont to walk and bicycle in the scenic, human- scale towns and compact,
> pedestrian-friendly town centers have proved to be an economic boon. In 1992, an estimated 32,500
> visiting cyclists spent $13.1 million in Vermont about twice the amount of money generated by
> Vermont's maple syrup producers in a good year.
>
> Source: Bicycle Touring in Vermont and Vermont's Scenic Byways Program, Bruce Burgess for the
> Vermont Agency of Transportation, 1995
>
> ----
>
> http://www.parkweb.vic.gov.au/resources/08_0538.pdf
>
> Average UK expenditure was £146 (US$232) per trip, or £30-35 ($48-56) per night. (Source: Sustrans
> Cycle Tourism Information Pack TT21,
> 1998).
>
> VTCC Stepping Out brochure evaluation (2000) indicated Victorian trip spending of between Aus$200
> (US$123) and Aus$1200 (US$740), and average Aus$400-Aus$500 (US$247-US$308) per trip.
>
> ------
>
> Here is contact info for Sustrans:
>
> "Sustrans publishes a comprehensive guide to standards for the construction of the National
> Cycling network. They live at 35 King Street Bristol. Tel. 01179 268893
>
> "Website www.sustrans.org.uk
>
> "Sustrans also produce a very good information pack (number TT21) explaining the possibilities and
> benefits of developing tourism called, logically enough 'Cycle Tourism'."
>
>
> ----------------------
>
>
> Brent Hugh/bhugh @ mwsc.edu
>
> +++++++++++++++++ Brent Hugh / bhugh @ mwsc.edu +++++++++++++++
> + Missouri Western St College Dept of Music, St. Joseph, MO +
> + Piano Home Page : http://staff.mwsc.edu/~bhugh +
> + Music IQ Songs : http://mp3.com/MusicIQ + ++ Music of the Human Genome :
> http://mp3.com/brent_d_hugh ++++
 
Status
Not open for further replies.