Tyre pressure

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by The Murray Midget, Jul 19, 2004.

  1. Is it possible to get your tyres rock hard as they should be on a
    racer with a hand pump?

    I bought a windpipe hand pump and have not managed to get my tyres
    hard with it, to be honest I struggle with it full stop and more often
    than not come away with less air in than before. Is there a technique
    to it?

    Do I have to just buy one of the floor standing pumps or will this not
    even guarentee success? At the moment I go to my local bike shop round
    the corner and use their machine, however I am sure that they are
    starting to tyre of me (sorry for dreadful pun)

    Thanks

    Murray
     
    Tags:


  2. GABIKE

    GABIKE Guest

    >Is it possible to get your tyres rock hard as they should be on a
    >racer with a hand pump?
    >

    No

    >I bought a windpipe hand pump and have not managed to get my tyres
    >hard with it, to be honest I struggle with it full stop and more often
    >than not come away with less air in than before. Is there a technique
    >to it?


    NO
    >
    >Do I have to just buy one of the floor standing pumps or will this not
    >even guarentee success?


    Yes
    >At the moment I go to my local bike shop round
    >the corner and use their machine, however I am sure that they are
    >starting to tyre of me (


    Im sure they are.

    Handpumps are not for daily use. They are for roadside repairs that will get
    you enough air to get you home. Personally I use CO2 since handpumps tend to
    wear out after the second use.
     
  3. "GABIKE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >Is it possible to get your tyres rock hard as they should be on a
    > >racer with a hand pump?
    > >

    > No


    Yes. Unless you're riding the track or pumping the hell out of your tires
    for a TT, there's no reason to ride over 120 psi. You can do it with a frame
    pump (I've done it with a SILCA pump), but you would't want to on more than
    an occasional basis.

    >
    > >I bought a windpipe hand pump and have not managed to get my tyres
    > >hard with it, to be honest I struggle with it full stop and more often
    > >than not come away with less air in than before. Is there a technique
    > >to it?

    >
    > NO


    Yes. Hold the pump head end straight out from you with your non dominant
    hand, gripping the pump with your fingers and wrapping your thumb around the
    tire. Push the pump shaft into the pump body with your dominant hand. As you
    get close to the desired pressure, use shorter strokes and help by using
    both arms to pump.

    There are some frame pumps (Topeak used to make one) that can be used
    similar to a floor pump. They have a little fold out step for your foot and
    the handle turns 90 degrees to be a T-handle. Much easier to use your body
    weight to pump high pressure than your arms.

    > >
    > >Do I have to just buy one of the floor standing pumps or will this not
    > >even guarentee success?

    >
    > Yes


    It will make life much easier.

    > >At the moment I go to my local bike shop round
    > >the corner and use their machine, however I am sure that they are
    > >starting to tyre of me (

    >
    > Im sure they are.
    >
    > Handpumps are not for daily use. They are for roadside repairs that will

    get
    > you enough air to get you home. Personally I use CO2 since handpumps tend

    to
    > wear out after the second use.


    Then don't buy a cheap one.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >Is it possible to get your tyres rock hard as they should be on a
    >racer with a hand pump?


    Depends on the pump and how strong your arms are. I get my tires up
    over 100 psi with my zefal HPX and my topeak morph.

    >I bought a windpipe hand pump and have not managed to get my tyres
    >hard with it, to be honest I struggle with it full stop and more often
    >than not come away with less air in than before. Is there a technique
    >to it?


    You really should use a floor pump to pump up your tires on a regular
    basis and save the hand pump for fixing flats on the road.

    >Do I have to just buy one of the floor standing pumps or will this not
    >even guarentee success? At the moment I go to my local bike shop round
    >the corner and use their machine, however I am sure that they are
    >starting to tyre of me (sorry for dreadful pun)


    Yup, a floor pump is the way to go. Why would the bike store tire of you?
    The more time you spend there, the better the chances of you spending your
    money their.
    ------------
    Alex
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    >Handpumps are not for daily use. They are for roadside repairs that will get
    >you enough air to get you home. Personally I use CO2 since handpumps tend to
    >wear out after the second use.


    What happens when you get that second, or third, flat? That's one reason
    I don't use CO2. What pumps have you been buying that fall apart after
    two uses? I've used a Zefal HPX and a Topeak Morph with great sucesss.
    Both pump up to full pressure and get me back on the road.
    ---------------
    Alex
     
  6. Thanks for all the help. It sounds like a floor standing pump will
    make life easier. Next question is can you recommend a make?

    Dan

    Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > >Is it possible to get your tyres rock hard as they should be on a
    > >racer with a hand pump?

    >
    > Depends on the pump and how strong your arms are. I get my tires up
    > over 100 psi with my zefal HPX and my topeak morph.
    >
    > >I bought a windpipe hand pump and have not managed to get my tyres
    > >hard with it, to be honest I struggle with it full stop and more often
    > >than not come away with less air in than before. Is there a technique
    > >to it?

    >
    > You really should use a floor pump to pump up your tires on a regular
    > basis and save the hand pump for fixing flats on the road.
    >
    > >Do I have to just buy one of the floor standing pumps or will this not
    > >even guarentee success? At the moment I go to my local bike shop round
    > >the corner and use their machine, however I am sure that they are
    > >starting to tyre of me (sorry for dreadful pun)

    >
    > Yup, a floor pump is the way to go. Why would the bike store tire of you?
    > The more time you spend there, the better the chances of you spending your
    > money their.
    > ------------
    > Alex
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >Thanks for all the help. It sounds like a floor standing pump will
    >make life easier. Next question is can you recommend a make?


    Old reliable would be a silca. I use a Zefal double shot.
    ----------------
    Alex
     
  8. "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > >Thanks for all the help. It sounds like a floor standing pump will
    > >make life easier. Next question is can you recommend a make?

    >
    > Old reliable would be a silca. I use a Zefal double shot.


    Suggestion: double barreled pumps are not good for climbers and other
    lightweight people.
     
  9. Clovis Lark

    Clovis Lark Guest

    Carl Sundquist <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >
    >> >Thanks for all the help. It sounds like a floor standing pump will
    >> >make life easier. Next question is can you recommend a make?

    >>
    >> Old reliable would be a silca. I use a Zefal double shot.


    > Suggestion: double barreled pumps are not good for climbers and other
    > lightweight people.


    Eddy Merckx would agree, he found that cleaning out the lead pellets
    rarely worked 100% and one left behind inevitably resulted in a chipped
    tooth. He recommends extra marination for lightweights as they tend to be
    stringy and tough. They lack the soft buttery texture of Freds...
     
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