Tyre problems - Pleeeease Help!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Yellow, Apr 4, 2007.

  1. Yellow

    Yellow New Member

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    I think I'm not the only one with this frustration, but I seem to be getting a lot of punctures (on a new bike - 2 months old) and have an unbelievable time changing the inner tube (getting the tyre back on the rim). Most times I end up back at the bike shop and get them to change it for me. They have checked the wheel and tyre and assure me both are ok.

    The tyres that came on my bike are Vredestein Ricorso (700 x 23). I am 175cm tall and weigh 75kg.

    Some questions which I hope you can all help me with:

    1. Are these tyres any good?

    2. I want to look at buying a more puncture resistant tyre. Names I've heard of are Conti Gator Skins and Michelin Carbons. What are these like and are there any better ones available?

    3. Are some tyres harder to get back on the wheel than others? If so, what ones are easier to get on and that are still going to give good puncture resistance.

    A lot of questions, hope you can help.

    Cheers
     
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  2. sogood

    sogood New Member

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    Not familiar with your tyre but if you are getting lots of punctures, then it's probably worth considering changing. Before you do that, what were the causes of your past punctures? 1" nails? Pinch flats? Small glass fragments? If it's 1" nails or similar, then no tyre will be able to prevent that. If it's pinch flat, then you need to pump your tyres and keep it under check. If it's small glass fragments, then a change of tyre may be of benefit.

    Apart for Conti's Ultra GatorSkin, their GP4000 has been very good for me too from a puncture resistance point of view.
     
  3. Retro Grouch

    Retro Grouch New Member

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    Frequent flat tires isn't normal. Before you do anything else, I'd take the time to analyze what's causing your flats. Take several of your flattened inner tubes, find and mark where the holes are.

    Holes on the inside circumference are generally the result of bad rim tape. That's more common on new bikes than I think that it should be. The rim tape has to cover every tiny crescent of rim hole. 17mm Velox is good for lthe majority of wheels.

    Holes on the outside circumference are punctures from glass or thorns. If you make a habit of lining up your tire's label with the valve stem, you can match the hole with the tire. If you've gotten several in about the same place, you have a piece of glass or wire or something stuck in your tire. Find it and pull ir out or buy a new tire.

    Holes on the side, usually 2 parallel slits are impact flats. Common causes are riding with inadequate air pressure and getting the inner tube stuck under one of the tire beads.

    Incidentally, getting the inner tube stuck under the tire bead can also cause the most exciting type of flat tire. If you hear what sounds like a shot gun and your tire goes instantly flat, that's what just happened.
     
  4. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    OUCH!!!!!
     
  5. rwinthenorth

    rwinthenorth New Member

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    All right on the mark. For me it was punctures and a tire bead flat. I ducked in my car at a light when the "shotgun went off"! "Exciting" wasn't the word I thought of first...
    One more thing I've learned over time, don't use a tire lever to put your tire back on the rim. You' ll catch the tube on an edge and tear it, even a little bit. Just keep working it around with your fingers. They get stronger over time. I also carefully inspect the whole rim, running a finger under the tire wire to make sure the tube isn't sticking out where it mught get caught when you start to inflate it. Also, I use Conti Gator skins. Haven't had a flat in over a year.:)
     
  6. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    Just bought some Vredestein Ricorsos to mount on new wheels where I was unable to mount some Vittoria Zafiros ( same class of wire beads) With a little difficulty they went on (they were recommended as being easier to mount and were). Not sure about their puncture resistance yet but they ride well and seem stoutly built.

    This business about getting tires on without using the irons, I've seldom been able to do it, and I refuse to believe that anyone can always do it ( and I'd bet that NO ONE could do it with the Vittorias on my Sun CR18 rims!). There is a tire iron sold on Ebay called the "Slider" which hooks on the rim which is supposed to prevent tube pinch. I have a set but don't know if this is absolutely true yet, but you can get a set for about $4.00 with shipping. One thing I'm sure will help is 2 parts dish soap, 1 part water applied to the tire bead and rim edge to lube things + dip the tire iron head. Also helps in removal.

    Most cyclists agree that Specialized Turbo Armadillos are about the longest wearing and most puncture resistant tires to be had. Mine lasted till the bead cords started to shread from dryness, and I only had 1 flat in almost 2 years.
    The downside? They are very heavy, ride like stones, and handle like crap!
     
  7. nmcgann

    nmcgann New Member

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    Schwalbe Stelvio Plus and Michelin Krylion Carbons are both good 23c tyres with better then average puncture protection. Conti Gatorskins are hopeless, especially if you live in an area with flints on the roads.

    Specialized Armadillo all-conditions are the best for puncture resistance, but rather heavy and stiff.

    Neil
     
  8. supergrill

    supergrill New Member

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    Nah, I'd take the Conti Ultra-Gatorskins over the others for puncture resistance any day. You can save a bit on weight with the folding bead version but only in the 23C. I think the Conti GP 4-Seasons are a notch up on handling, if you want to spend a bit more. The Michelin Carbons have fairly good durability but are atrocious in wet conditions, like riding on wet chalk. For winter riding on lousy road conditions I usually swap out for 25C's as well.
     
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