Ugh another flat tire, any tips?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bolo Grubb, Jul 15, 2004.

  1. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    ok I have now put 3 tubes in this front tire in the last 2 weeks. Before this last 2 week I only ever 1 or 2 other flats on the front and just 1 on the back (blow out on first ride)

    I have tried and failed to find anthing in the tire that would cause a flat. Am I missing something? What can I do to make sure?

    any suggestions on reducing flats would be greatly appreciated.

    The Tire is a Kenda Koncept 700x23c. The rim is Alexrims DA22. Same Rim and tire on the back and only ever 1 flat there. I have tried various tubes recommended by the LBS
     
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  2. Jono 61

    Jono 61 New Member

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    Have you got the tires pumped up enough? The lower the pressure the easier it is for something to penetrate the tires.
     
  3. dorian

    dorian New Member

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    Are there holes in your tire? Are the holes in the tube on the outside or inside? Your rim tape may have slipped, exposing some of the nipple holes. If so, your tube will bulge into it and puncture quickly. Be sure to talc your tubes and install them carefully.
     
  4. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    Talc my tubes? I have not heard of this. please explain to me how to properly do this and what the benifits are

    Thanks

    also I have not had time to carefully examine the tube and tire as this morning's flat was thankfully close to the end of my ride and I had to get ready for work.
     
  5. BikeyGuy

    BikeyGuy New Member

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    Take a cotton cloth and run it around the inside of the tire. If there is something in there, sometimes the cloth will "snag" it. Although, when in doubt, get a new tire.
    Safe riding.
     
  6. Mr_Potatohead

    Mr_Potatohead New Member

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    Front wheel flats are less common normally so I'd suspect something other than road debris.

    Make sure your rim tape completely covers up the spoke nipples. If you have any doubts, buy some 3/4 inch fiberglass reinforced strapping tape and use that as rim tape. Just as good as bike shop rim tape but cheaper. One roll will do many wheels.

    Also make sure your tires are inflated fully to the high end of the recommended range. Check the inside surface of the tire for debris that has poked through the casing, like small bits of glass.

    A tire with a very high casing thread count, like 200 tpi is preferable for puncture resistance.

    Also try a tire liner like Mr. Tuffy, or my personal favorite Panaracer Flat Away. You could try thornproof tubes or self sealing tubes as well.
     
  7. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    The tires are rated for 110psi and I have been pumping them to 100psi
     
  8. createdtodestry

    createdtodestry New Member

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    I recently had a flat because stupidly when I bought new wheels i just bought standard tubes. I found the reson of the flat to be a uncovered spoke, so I put black elecrtical tape over the spokes rather than the stupid rubber strips I had. I bought a slime tube that reseals its self if it gets punctured, but it says that it wont stop pinch flats. Last night I pop'd the other tire and will do the same for it. I'm guessing that your talking about a road bike so you wont want to add any weight to it.
     
  9. gubaguba

    gubaguba New Member

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    Yes that why I use a carbon fiber rim tape. Very Expensive very light. My guess is that you either have something stuck in your tire a thorn perhaps or a rough edge on the rim.
     
  10. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Another mistake is when airing up the tire sometimes the pump tubes is hard to remove. If you pull too hard on the stem it will cause small cracks around where the valve stem is attached to the tube. Always hold the stem firmly when when removing the pump. Keep them inflated to the max and stay away from roads with gravel and debris as much as possible.
     
  11. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    I did cause one tube to blow when the pump got stuck on the stem and I ended up pulling the stem out of the tube :mad:

    Since then I have been more careful but perhaps I should use some pliers or something to hold the stem in place while I wiggle the pump head off
     
  12. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I think that anyone that says it never happened to them doesn't ride much,doesn't remember or is not telling the truth.
     
  13. Weisse Luft

    Weisse Luft New Member

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    Always check the ruptured tube before sticking a new one in the tire. You will locate the problem (if you aligned the tire's name tag over the valve stem) and if its a repeat problem, look for tire trouble.

    A small cut in the tire will make a star-shaped hole in the tube (and a good bit of noise when it blows). Repeat holes in the tread area of the tire are due to imbedded frags in the tire. Frequently, these bits hide until you ride, when they are then forced into the tube.

    Look on the outside surface of the tire for cuts. When one is found, probe it with a toothpick and remove any debris. Repair such defects with contact cement or other products to prevent debris pick-up.
     
  14. p38lightning

    p38lightning New Member

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    I've learned some things by reading the good advice that you've already gotten. Try turning the tire inside out as you work your way around it in small sections. This may reveal something that you haven't been able to see or feel yet. If you have needed to adjust a spoke to the point that it is a prononced point or bump in you rim strip or rim tape grind it down smooth with a Dremel tool and emory cloth.
     
  15. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    Wessie's advice is wise; always closely examine a busted tube after removing it. The culprit could be obvious, but you'd be doomed to flat after flat if you don't investigate.

    Assuming you're installing the tube and tire carefully and correctly, there are a few basic problems that can get ya repeatedly. Always, for instance, run your fingers along the inside of the empty tire after a flat -- if the problem was a standard puncture or cut, the offending bit of glass or rock could still be lodged in there, waiting to nail you five miles later. As others have mentioned, inspect the inside of your clincher rim for evidence of a sharp spot; the area around the valve hole is sometimes messily drilled.

    Of course, all of this detective work is much easier when you've got the corpse as evidence.

    There are some basic steps to follow during tube installation that can make pinch-flats less likely as well. One particularly anal step that can help: once the tube and tire are seated, pump the tube up to 30 or so psi, and release the air out. Repeat once or twice. Think of this as applying tension to the tube on and off, popping any twists or kinks out, and reducing the risk that any limp sections are caught beneath the tire bead. Again -- not a necessary step, but an anal one worth following if you're troubleshooting multiple flats.

    The other step you should follow every time you install a tube is to pull the tire to one side and peek down in the rim to insure no tube is smooshed or popping out from under the bead; follow the tire all the way around the rim, flip the wheel over, and check the other side. This isn't something you'd do in the middle of a race, but again, in the interest of reducing your flats, something you should do regularly in normal situations.

    Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
     
  16. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    after dunking the tube in water to find the leak I was able to find the small thorn in the tire that caused it.

    I missed the thorn the first time I checked the tire.

    Thanks for all the tips on dealing with a flat tire
     
  17. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    yet another flat tire

    ok I am taking the tire, wheel and tube to the LBS tonight and ask for help.

    Last time I rode was on Sunday, a nice hilly 22.7 miles course with WKrider. WE complete the ride with no problems. No flats noticed.

    I go out this morning to go for a ride and my front tire is completely flat. A rim side blow out right over a spoke. But the spoke is good and tight with nothing poking into the rim to make contact with the tire.

    The hole in the tire is a jagged hole, not a simple hole.
     
  18. createdtodestry

    createdtodestry New Member

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    I was haveing a problem with flats last thursday I think it was. I first had gotten a flat from a spoke the night befor which I fixed, or so I thought, with a tube which had a slow leak, and turned out to be a rather quick leak. I sealed the hole and went riding, and got a thorn in the sidewall. well anyways I replaced it and decided that im gona start bringing a extra tube along with tools to change it. Oh and also make sure to always check for sharp objects in the tire befor you put a new tube in, im glad I did. Whenever i get a flat i dont put the tire back on untill i find the cause and fix it.
     
  19. tinajoy

    tinajoy New Member

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    That's a great idea, when I first started riding the person who was teaching me......attached a little emergency patch kit.. right under my seat for emergency use.
    Also the last time I was at the bike shop I bought a new tire...............the mechanice called it a "BULLET PROOF" tire and told me it would never go flat.......and so far it has never gone flat.....Is there such a thing? Cause no one even mentioned it on this thread.......Did I get ripped off?
     
  20. Bolo Grubb

    Bolo Grubb New Member

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    I have never heard of a "bullet proof" tire so no idea on that.

    My last flat seems to be due to bad rim tape, I replaced the rim tape on both tires with a cloth rim tape.
     
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