UK ingredients

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by mrs_cruella, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. mrs_cruella

    mrs_cruella Guest

    I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should I
    ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!

    Living in the land of cows.

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  2. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    mrs_cruella wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    > I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >
    > Living in the land of cows.
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
    >

    clotted cream, irish bacon, lyle's golden syrup and of course clotted cream...

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  3. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    >I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    >I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.)

    -----------------
    Lyle's Golden Syrup
     
  4. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    As to what to bring back from the UK, hahabogus suggests:
    >clotted cream, irish bacon, lyle's golden syrup and of course clotted cream...
    --------------------------
    I'm pretty sure you won't be allowed to bring back bacon. And I would question about the cream. How
    many hours would it go without refrigeration? Quite a few, 3 or 4 hours before boarding in UK, plus
    the flight, plus arrival in Us.
     
  5. PaulaGarlic

    PaulaGarlic Guest

    "Nancree" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    > >should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.)
    >
    > -----------------
    > Lyle's Golden Syrup

    Can't you get that in Chicago? I can find the little tins of it here in many of the stupid little
    supermarkets of upstate New York. I recently used it in place of molasses in some gingerbread
    cookies. Very good.

    Paula
     
  6. [email protected] (Nancree) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > As to what to bring back from the UK, hahabogus suggests:
    >>clotted cream, irish bacon, lyle's golden syrup and of course clotted cream...
    > --------------------------
    > I'm pretty sure you won't be allowed to bring back bacon. And I would question about the cream.
    > How many hours would it go without refrigeration? Quite a few, 3 or 4 hours before boarding in UK,
    > plus the flight, plus arrival in Us.
    >
    >

    Clotted cream holds pretty well at room temperature. It's often unfrigerated in UK homes.
     
  7. mrs_cruella wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    > I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >
    > Living in the land of cows.

    Along with the other suggestions, shredded suet and pudding rice.
     
  8. Yeff

    Yeff Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 04:06:40 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > Along with the other suggestions, shredded suet and pudding rice.

    Is pudding rice anything like rice pudding?

    -Jeff B. yeff at erols dot com
     
  9. Elana Kehoe

    Elana Kehoe Guest

    <mrs_cruella> wrote:

    > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    > I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!

    Beef products (even canned) are not allowed to be brought into the US. Most pork products aren't
    allowed either (I recently had to talk to the USDA about what foods are allowed in). Only things
    that have been processed or cooked. I'm doubtful of the clotted cream.

    I'd get some nice strong tea, some digestives, *chocolate*, smoked salmon, bramble jam, blackcurrant
    anything, Flake, orange marmalade. Oh, and a tin of baked beans (they're in tomato sauce, and you
    have them either on toast or with breakfast...yum!). Brown sauce, like HP. Colman's mustard (get a
    tin of the dry one...so much more versatile). I don't know if Mikados or Kimberleys are available in
    the UK (I think they're Irish only), but they're yummy.
    --
    "In Finnegans Wake, he just made up words. Now that's just not sporting!" ..A friend on James Joyce
     
  10. mrs_cruella a écrit :

    > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    > I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!

    Nothing :-((((( The US has recently banned *all* private food importation (including boxes of
    chocolate that Swiss people often bring - that's how I know that, it made the newspaper headlines
    here), for "security reasons" (?!?!).

    Nathalie in Switzerland
     
  11. "Elana Kehoe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1g9nl2i.vyjf79187u3m3N%[email protected]...
    > <mrs_cruella> wrote:
    >
    > > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    > > should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >
    > Beef products (even canned) are not allowed to be brought into the US. Most pork products aren't
    > allowed either (I recently had to talk to the USDA about what foods are allowed in). Only things
    > that have been processed or cooked. I'm doubtful of the clotted cream.
    >
    > I'd get some nice strong tea, some digestives, *chocolate*, smoked salmon, bramble jam,
    > blackcurrant anything, Flake, orange marmalade. Oh, and a tin of baked beans (they're in tomato
    > sauce, and you have them either on toast or with breakfast...yum!). Brown sauce, like HP. Colman's
    > mustard (get a tin of the dry one...so much more versatile). I don't know if Mikados or Kimberleys
    > are available in the UK (I think they're Irish only), but they're yummy.

    All the above (including the Irish pork products -both fresh and processed) are available in the
    U.S. either in British groceries, mail order or online. There are lots of British and Irish foods
    for sale here in the U.S. My local British Grocery has 15,000 items available and will order what
    they don't have.

    Speaking of steak sauce, Alana Steak sauce is no longer available I understand. Anyone in the U.S.
    needs to be careful when buying HP sauce. Some of it is made in New Jersey and tastes awful

    Charlie
     
  12. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:44:50 +0100, Nathalie Chiva
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >mrs_cruella a écrit :
    >
    >> I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    >> should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >
    >Nothing :-((((( The US has recently banned *all* private food importation (including boxes of
    >chocolate that Swiss people often bring - that's how I know that, it made the newspaper headlines
    >here), for "security reasons" (?!?!).

    Well, shoot. That *is* rotten news. Someone once brought me a box of (fresh) chocolates from a 1-
    person kitchen in Geneva, and they were absolutely the best chocolate I've ever had in my life,
    before or since. Poor innocent chocolate.
     
  13. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Mon, 23 Feb 2004 21:55:47 GMT, mrs_cruella wrote:

    >I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What should
    >I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.)

    If you (or your friend) didn't have anything specific in mind, there's not much point in making up a
    list. Kind as the offer is, many food items are messy, perishable, and heavy. As others have pointed
    out, the casual 'importation' of food or drink is highly regulated. Also, many items can be
    purchased through mail-order (wouldn't want to try this with cream!) or available in shops here.
    Even my culinarily-dark corner has a 'Best of Britain' shop that stocks candies, sauces, jams, teas,
    and canned goods for the homesick ex-pat.

    Have your friend bring recipes and experiment together.
     
  14. On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 04:05:53 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > [email protected] (Nancree) wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>
    >> As to what to bring back from the UK, hahabogus suggests:
    >>>clotted cream, irish bacon, lyle's golden syrup and of course clotted cream...
    >> --------------------------
    >> I'm pretty sure you won't be allowed to bring back bacon. And I would question about the cream.
    >> How many hours would it go without refrigeration? Quite a few, 3 or 4 hours before boarding in
    >> UK, plus the flight, plus arrival in Us.
    >>
    >
    > Clotted cream holds pretty well at room temperature. It's often unfrigerated in UK homes.

    And it's usually pretty cool in the baggage holds of planes.
    --
    Tim.

    If the human brain were simple enough that we could understand it, we would be so simple that
    we couldn't.
     
  15. Yeff <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 04:06:40 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >> Along with the other suggestions, shredded suet and pudding rice.
    >
    > Is pudding rice anything like rice pudding?
    >
    > -Jeff B. yeff at erols dot com
    >

    It's the raw rice one uses to make rice pudding. It's a short grain creamy-textured rice.

    Wayne
     
  16. MareCat

    MareCat Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 11:03:53 GMT, "Charles Gifford"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Elana Kehoe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:1g9nl2i.vyjf79187u3m3N%[email protected]...
    >> <mrs_cruella> wrote:
    >>
    >> > I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    >> > should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >>
    >> Beef products (even canned) are not allowed to be brought into the US. Most pork products aren't
    >> allowed either (I recently had to talk to the USDA about what foods are allowed in). Only things
    >> that have been processed or cooked. I'm doubtful of the clotted cream.
    >>
    >> I'd get some nice strong tea, some digestives, *chocolate*, smoked salmon, bramble jam,
    >> blackcurrant anything, Flake, orange marmalade. Oh, and a tin of baked beans (they're in tomato
    >> sauce, and you have them either on toast or with breakfast...yum!). Brown sauce, like HP.
    >> Colman's mustard (get a tin of the dry one...so much more versatile). I don't know if Mikados or
    >> Kimberleys are available in the UK (I think they're Irish only), but they're yummy.
    >
    >All the above (including the Irish pork products -both fresh and processed) are available in the
    >U.S. either in British groceries, mail order or online. There are lots of British and Irish foods
    >for sale here in the U.S. My local British Grocery has 15,000 items available and will order what
    >they don't have.

    My local supermarkets carry most, if not all, of the items above. I live in a Houston suburb that
    has a large population from the UK (many of whom work for an oil-field services corp. in the area),
    so that may be the reason, but I would imagine that many supermarkets in the Chicago area would
    carry those items as well.
     
  17. mrs_cruella

    mrs_cruella Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 09:08:53 +0000, [email protected] (Elana Kehoe) wrote:

    ><mrs_cruella> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    >> should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >
    >Beef products (even canned) are not allowed to be brought into the US. Most pork products aren't
    >allowed either (I recently had to talk to the USDA about what foods are allowed in). Only things
    >that have been processed or cooked. I'm doubtful of the clotted cream.
    >
    >I'd get some nice strong tea, some digestives, *chocolate*, smoked salmon, bramble jam,
    >blackcurrant anything, Flake, orange marmalade. Oh, and a tin of baked beans (they're in tomato
    >sauce, and you have them either on toast or with breakfast...yum!). Brown sauce, like HP. Colman's
    >mustard (get a tin of the dry one...so much more versatile). I don't know if Mikados or Kimberleys
    >are available in the UK (I think they're Irish only), but they're yummy.
    >--
    >"In Finnegans Wake, he just made up words. Now that's just not sporting!" ..A friend on James Joyce

    I've already requested some black currant & licorice candy and some "creamed coconut" that comes in
    a block. (I need this for one of Nigella Lawson's coconut cakes.)

    She always takes back Kraft's Honey Mustard dressing and Miracle Whip.

    Keep those ideas coming! Thanks!

    Living in the land of cows.

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
     
  18. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    mrs_cruella wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 09:08:53 +0000, [email protected] (Elana Kehoe) wrote:
    >
    >><mrs_cruella> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a friend coming to visit from the UK. She wants to bring me foodie ingredients. What
    >>> should I ask for? (I'm in the Chicago area.) TIA!
    >>
    >>Beef products (even canned) are not allowed to be brought into the US. Most pork products aren't
    >>allowed either (I recently had to talk to the USDA about what foods are allowed in). Only things
    >>that have been processed or cooked. I'm doubtful of the clotted cream.
    >>
    >>I'd get some nice strong tea, some digestives, *chocolate*, smoked salmon, bramble jam,
    >>blackcurrant anything, Flake, orange marmalade. Oh, and a tin of baked beans (they're in tomato
    >>sauce, and you have them either on toast or with breakfast...yum!). Brown sauce, like HP. Colman's
    >>mustard (get a tin of the dry one...so much more versatile). I don't know if Mikados or Kimberleys
    >>are available in the UK (I think they're Irish only), but they're yummy.
    >>--
    >>"In Finnegans Wake, he just made up words. Now that's just not sporting!" ..A friend on
    >>James Joyce
    >
    > I've already requested some black currant & licorice candy and some "creamed coconut" that comes
    > in a block. (I need this for one of Nigella Lawson's coconut cakes.)
    >
    > She always takes back Kraft's Honey Mustard dressing and Miracle Whip.
    >
    > Keep those ideas coming! Thanks!
    >
    >
    > Living in the land of cows.
    >
    >
    > -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    > Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 100,000 Newsgroups - 19 Different Servers! =-----
    >

    An assortment of chocolate bars...some of the ones you can't get in the US...

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
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