Unborn Chicken Eggs

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Michael \Dog3\ Lonergan, Jan 9, 2006.

  1. I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up piqued
    my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at the butcher
    shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn eggs were mentioned.
    Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As Margaret pointed out, the chickens
    today are completely cleaned of internal organs with the exception of the
    giblet packet (which I use in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the
    meat after the stock is strained). I started snooping around on Google and
    came across several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist
    groups ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a graphic
    pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.

    http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html

    Michael

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
    Tags:


  2. kevnbro

    kevnbro Guest

    Interesting and informative- Redneck escargot. ;) Kev
     
  3. jillie

    jillie Guest

    A hundred years ago, when I was a child and lived on a farm, my mother
    would roast a chicken and put the "un born" eggs in the gravy. These
    were the eggs that were developing in the chicken and were removed when
    my dad dressed out the chicken. The eggs consisted of just the yolk
    and there were usually quite a few..ranging in size from small to tiny.
    Don't know how they were cooked, but they were always floating in the
    gravy and were delicious. Hadn't thought of those for years...thanks
    for a good memory.

    jillie
    Roseville, CA
     
  4. "jillie" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > A hundred years ago, when I was a child and lived on a farm, my mother
    > would roast a chicken and put the "un born" eggs in the gravy. These
    > were the eggs that were developing in the chicken and were removed when
    > my dad dressed out the chicken. The eggs consisted of just the yolk
    > and there were usually quite a few..ranging in size from small to tiny.
    > Don't know how they were cooked, but they were always floating in the
    > gravy and were delicious. Hadn't thought of those for years...thanks
    > for a good memory.
    >
    > jillie
    > Roseville, CA


    Glad to bring back some memories Jillie. You can thank Margaret, she is
    the one that made me curious about the eggs. Margaret is full of
    information.

    Michael

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
  5. "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    (Snipped story of un-laid eggs.)

    When I first saw the subject line I thought you were talking about
    Balut. Now there's something most occidentals could really get
    squeamish about. Balut is a Philippine snack traditionally made with
    duck eggs. The balut are incubated up to the 18th day and contain a
    healthy living embryo. They are boiled and eaten as a snack food.
    However, several of the Vietnamese markets in this area sell the same
    type of thing using chicken eggs. The Vietnamese prefer them a bit
    farther along in the incubation, 19 to 21 days.
    If you're hungry, check out http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balut

    Enjoy,

    Ross.
    To email, remove the "obvious" from my address.
     
  6. Puester

    Puester Guest

    Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    > I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    > conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up piqued
    > my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at the butcher
    > shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn eggs were mentioned.
    > Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As Margaret pointed out, the chickens
    > today are completely cleaned of internal organs with the exception of the
    > giblet packet (which I use in stuffing and for stock.



    My parent's generation often got chickens which contained the egg organs
    with the eggs before the shell was formed. I can recall the yolks being
    boiled and added to stuffing. No big deal.

    I get more squicked out at the memory of the many pinfeathers left in
    the skin which had to be plucked after being dipped in boiling water.
    Ick. I can still remember the smell, 50 years later.

    gloria p
     
  7. Boron Elgar

    Boron Elgar Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 15:29:28 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    >conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up piqued
    >my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at the butcher
    >shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn eggs were mentioned.
    >Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As Margaret pointed out, the chickens
    >today are completely cleaned of internal organs with the exception of the
    >giblet packet (which I use in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the
    >meat after the stock is strained). I started snooping around on Google and
    >came across several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist
    >groups ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    >squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a graphic
    >pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.
    >
    >http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html
    >
    >Michael



    Whenever my mother ordered a soup chicken from the kosher butcher or
    she picked a live chicken to have prepared, she would always ask him
    to include the unborn eggs. We kids would fight over them in the soup
    & my mom would count them out for us so there were no fights.

    The chicken feet went into the soup too, after being singed over the
    gas burner. Now THAT really stunk up the place, but it still smelled
    better than the live chicken store. Feh. I used to beg to wait out on
    the sidewalk.

    There was still a similar live chicken store in Little Italy in
    Manhattan at least through the 70s, though I do not recall it being
    kosher. In fact, I think the sign was in Spanish.

    Boron
     
  8. djs0302

    djs0302 Guest

    Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    > I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    > conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up piqued
    > my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at the butcher
    > shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn eggs were mentioned.
    > Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As Margaret pointed out, the chickens
    > today are completely cleaned of internal organs with the exception of the
    > giblet packet (which I use in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the
    > meat after the stock is strained). I started snooping around on Google and
    > came across several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist
    > groups ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    > squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a graphic
    > pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.
    >
    > http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html
    >
    > Michael


    I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into a
    baby chicken.
     
  9. "djs0302" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:1136832833.944436.17[email protected]:

    >
    > Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >> I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    >> conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up
    >> piqued my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at
    >> the butcher shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn
    >> eggs were mentioned. Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As
    >> Margaret pointed out, the chickens today are completely cleaned of
    >> internal organs with the exception of the giblet packet (which I use
    >> in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the meat after the stock is
    >> strained). I started snooping around on Google and came across
    >> several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist groups
    >> ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    >> squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a
    >> graphic pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.
    >>
    >> http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html
    >>
    >> Michael

    >
    > I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    > uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    > matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    > be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    > embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    > embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into
    > a baby chicken.


    At the risk of being flamed, I heartily agree with you. I am also pro-
    choice.

    Michael

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
  10. "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    > uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    > matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    > be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    > embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    > embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into a
    > baby chicken.


    It just makes you wonder what gives people the idea to eat certain things.

    - chicken eggs
    - oysters
    - fish roe

    etc. Mmm. chicken eggs, oysters, and fish roe!
     
  11. On Mon, 9 Jan 2006, rox formerly rmg wrote:

    >
    > "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    > > uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    > > matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    > > be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    > > embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    > > embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into a
    > > baby chicken.

    >
    > It just makes you wonder what gives people the idea to eat certain things.
    >
    > - chicken eggs
    > - oysters
    > - fish roe
    >
    > etc. Mmm. chicken eggs, oysters, and fish roe!
    >


    Oh, my!
     
  12. Curly Sue

    Curly Sue Guest

    On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 20:57:25 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"djs0302" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >>
    >> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>> I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    >>> conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up
    >>> piqued my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at
    >>> the butcher shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn
    >>> eggs were mentioned. Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As
    >>> Margaret pointed out, the chickens today are completely cleaned of
    >>> internal organs with the exception of the giblet packet (which I use
    >>> in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the meat after the stock is
    >>> strained). I started snooping around on Google and came across
    >>> several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist groups
    >>> ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    >>> squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a
    >>> graphic pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html
    >>>
    >>> Michael

    >>
    >> I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    >> uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    >> matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    >> be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    >> embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    >> embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into
    >> a baby chicken.

    >
    >At the risk of being flamed, I heartily agree with you. I am also pro-
    >choice.


    For chickens? :)

    Most animal activists are against killing animals of any age. To get
    at the unborn eggs one would have to kill the chicken which, I
    imagine, is the main reason they object.

    (Clearly, in this case, the chicken *is* first.)

    Sue(tm)
    Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
     
  13. aem

    aem Guest

    Curly Sue wrote:
    >
    > Most animal activists are against killing animals of any age. To get
    > at the unborn eggs one would have to kill the chicken which, I
    > imagine, is the main reason they object.


    I don't think animal activists are necessarily vegetarian or vegan. A
    lot of them only care about the pet-type animals. -aem
     
  14. [email protected] (Curly Sue) looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Mon, 09 Jan 2006 20:57:25 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"djs0302" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    >>news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
    >>>> I was chatting with Margaret on the telephone last evening. The
    >>>> conversation ranged on many topics but the one topic she brought up
    >>>> piqued my curiosity. She was telling me stories about her mother at
    >>>> the butcher shop and the meat etc., her mother would buy. Unborn
    >>>> eggs were mentioned. Now I have never seen an unborn egg. As
    >>>> Margaret pointed out, the chickens today are completely cleaned of
    >>>> internal organs with the exception of the giblet packet (which I use
    >>>> in stuffing and for stock. The cats get the meat after the stock is
    >>>> strained). I started snooping around on Google and came across
    >>>> several sites. Some of the sights were from animal activist groups
    >>>> ;( I found one site which was interesting. If you are really
    >>>> squemish, do not click the HERE link within the article. It is a
    >>>> graphic pic of the unborn yolks. There is also a recipe on the page.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.soupsong.com/sharris.html
    >>>>
    >>>> Michael
    >>>
    >>> I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    >>> uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    >>> matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    >>> be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    >>> embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    >>> embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into
    >>> a baby chicken.

    >>
    >>At the risk of being flamed, I heartily agree with you. I am also pro-
    >>choice.

    >
    > For chickens? :)
    >
    > Most animal activists are against killing animals of any age. To get
    > at the unborn eggs one would have to kill the chicken which, I
    > imagine, is the main reason they object.
    >
    > (Clearly, in this case, the chicken *is* first.)
    >
    > Sue(tm)
    > Lead me not into temptation... I can find it myself!
    >


    Perhaps I'm a middle of the roader. I realize without animal research etc.
    I would no longer be here. OTOH, I refuse to eat veal and lamb because of
    the conditions the poor babies have to live under. I also vigorously
    pursue animal rights.

    I'm really not all that concerned about unborn people or animals. I am
    much more concerned with the unwanted and unloved people and animals in the
    living world. That is just me and that is my stance.

    Michael

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
  15. "aem" <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Curly Sue wrote:
    >>
    >> Most animal activists are against killing animals of any age. To get
    >> at the unborn eggs one would have to kill the chicken which, I
    >> imagine, is the main reason they object.

    >
    > I don't think animal activists are necessarily vegetarian or vegan. A
    > lot of them only care about the pet-type animals. -aem


    Gawd... reminds me of a friend I used to have. He was a PETA fanatic. His
    animals roamed everywhere and were routinely killed by cars on the streets.

    Michael <- never lets his animals out unless under his supervision. No, I
    don't even trust Steven with them outdoors.

    --
    Pics aren't great but here are 2 of my 4 brats.
    Hoot about to snatch the snack out of my mouth:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrw3o.jpg

    Ramsey ever curious about electronics breaking into the TMobile bag:
    http://tinypic.com/jtrwgn.jpg
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I think most of these animal activists are grossly misinformed and
    > uneducated. If the hen hasn't mated with a rooster why should it
    > matter if there are "unborn" eggs left inside it? The same thing can
    > be said about normal eggs. Without a rooster there can be no chicken
    > embryo. The yolk and white are food for the chicken embryo. The
    > embryo develops on the yolk but the yolk itself does not develop into a
    > baby chicken.


    A hen (pullet) is born with all her eggs inside her. She has a
    limited number of eggs she can lay because of this. All hens, unless
    they are allowed to live until they are absolutely spent will have some
    eggs that were unlaid in them. The animal activist crowd is crazy
    stupid.

    Regards.
    Ranee

    Remove do not & spam to e-mail me.

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/
    http://talesfromthekitchen.blogspot.com/
     
  17. cathy

    cathy Guest

    This has been a fascinating thread, but no one has answered (or even
    asked!) the crucial question -

    CAN you still find unborn chicken eggs for sale and if so where???

    Cathy
     
  18. -L.

    -L. Guest

    aem wrote:
    >
    > I don't think animal activists are necessarily vegetarian or vegan. A
    > lot of them only care about the pet-type animals. -aem


    I know pleanty of "animal activists" and am one myself. You can no
    more stereotype an animal rights activist than you can any other person
    who happens to belong to a particular group. The only commonality I
    can tell is a concern for animal welfare - that is manifested in many
    different ways and to many different degrees.

    -L.
     
  19. [email protected] wrote:
    > Balut is a Philippine snack traditionally made with
    > duck eggs. The balut are incubated up to the 18th day and contain a
    > healthy living embryo.


    I think Tony Bourdain got those those in Asia on one of his shows.

    --Blair
     
  20. RobtE

    RobtE Guest

    cathy wrote:
    > This has been a fascinating thread, but no one has answered (or even
    > asked!) the crucial question -
    >
    > CAN you still find unborn chicken eggs for sale and if so where???


    Yes. Try a halal butcher.

    When I lived in north London there was a halal butcher where I regularly
    shopped, primarily because their prices were cheaper than the
    supermarket. Their chickens were plucked but not drawn. If you asked for
    one, they would take it down from the ceiling hooks on which it hung and
    put it on the butchers block. Then they removed the feet and the head,
    and then somehow drew the chicken with an enormous cleaver. I can't
    remember how that worked. The result, though, was that when I came to
    finish prepping the bird for cooking, there were often quite a few
    "unborn" eggs of varying sizes. They were great fried in a bit of real
    butter.

    RobtE
     
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