underwater swimming

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Mrat, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Dory wrote:
    >
    > I was just wondering how one goes about increasing the distance one can swim underwater at the
    > pool (no great depth).

    Practice, practice, practice. Under supervision.

    martin

    --
    Draft Wesley Clark for President! www.DraftWesleyClark.com

    Martin Smith email: [email protected]
     


  2. Mrat

    Mrat Guest

    The swimming pool is 25x12(ish), What are the "bends"? And I'm 15 if that helps.

    I swim like this in the pool.

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    The pool is closed during the winter, so are there any ways to improve without being in the water?
     
  3. mrat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >The swimming pool is 25x12(ish), What are the "bends"? And I'm 15 if that helps.

    Bends are irrelevent unless you start doing this stuff in the open waters. And then you *really
    really* need a spotter, instead of just really needing one.

    >I swim like this in the pool.

    (racetrack) - do you push off, or just turn? A strong pushoff may cost more oxgyen than saved.

    >The pool is closed during the winter, so are there any ways to improve without being in the water?

    running, cycling, whatever builds up your cardio performance. Yoga may be another approach - improve
    your ability to relax and move efficiently.
    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
  4. de Valois wrote:
    > If you'll recall, I did not say he HAD a hit, rather in the course of giving him tips regarding
    > swimming for distance underwater, he should take pains to not try to hold his breath because of
    > the (admittedly slight) possibility of a DCI hit (popularly called the bends, and of course, I
    > used the layman's terms to make it clear to non-divers what I was talking about).
    >
    > If he swims along the bottom to increase his distance, then he might...*might*...conceivably reach
    > a depth where DCI is a remote possibility, say at the diving board end of a community pool, which
    > might range as deep as twelve feet.

    You can't get the bends in a swimming pool. Forget it. There is no possibility of getting the bends
    in a swimming pool.

    > The advice to not hold his breath still stands. He can get a DCI hit, because you have no way of
    > knowing whether his alveoli aren't damaged to begin with.

    He can't get the bends in the swimming pool. If he doesn't have DCS when he enters the pool, he
    won't have it when he gets out. He can go to the bottom and stay there all night, and it won't make
    a bit of difference. He can surface a hundred times, and he still won't have the bends.

    martin

    --
    Draft Wesley Clark for President! www.DraftWesleyClark.com

    Martin Smith email: [email protected]
     
  5. de Valois wrote:
    > If you'll recall, I did not say he HAD a hit, rather in the course of giving him tips regarding
    > swimming for distance underwater, he should take pains to not try to hold his breath because of
    > the (admittedly slight) possibility of a DCI hit (popularly called the bends, and of course, I
    > used the layman's terms to make it clear to non-divers what I was talking about).
    >
    > If he swims along the bottom to increase his distance, then he might...*might*...conceivably reach
    > a depth where DCI is a remote possibility, say at the diving board end of a community pool, which
    > might range as deep as twelve feet.

    You can't get the bends in a swimming pool. Forget it. There is no possibility of getting the bends
    in a swimming pool.

    > The advice to not hold his breath still stands. He can get a DCI hit, because you have no way of
    > knowing whether his alveoli aren't damaged to begin with.

    He can't get the bends in the swimming pool. If he doesn't have DCS when he enters the pool, he
    won't have it when he gets out. He can go to the bottom and stay there all night, and it won't make
    a bit of difference. He can surface a hundred times, and he still won't have the bends.

    martin

    --
    Draft Wesley Clark for President! www.DraftWesleyClark.com

    Martin Smith email: [email protected]
     
  6. de Valois wrote:
    > If you'll recall, I did not say he HAD a hit, rather in the course of giving him tips regarding
    > swimming for distance underwater, he should take pains to not try to hold his breath because of
    > the (admittedly slight) possibility of a DCI hit (popularly called the bends, and of course, I
    > used the layman's terms to make it clear to non-divers what I was talking about).
    >
    > If he swims along the bottom to increase his distance, then he might...*might*...conceivably reach
    > a depth where DCI is a remote possibility, say at the diving board end of a community pool, which
    > might range as deep as twelve feet.

    You can't get the bends in a swimming pool. Forget it. There is no possibility of getting the bends
    in a swimming pool.

    > The advice to not hold his breath still stands. He can get a DCI hit, because you have no way of
    > knowing whether his alveoli aren't damaged to begin with.

    He can't get the bends in the swimming pool. If he doesn't have DCS when he enters the pool, he
    won't have it when he gets out. He can go to the bottom and stay there all night, and it won't make
    a bit of difference. He can surface a hundred times, and he still won't have the bends.

    martin

    --
    Draft Wesley Clark for President! www.DraftWesleyClark.com

    Martin Smith email: [email protected]
     
  7. MJuric

    MJuric Guest

    On Thu, 04 Sep 2003 10:04:35 +0200, "Martin W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote: <Snippage>
    >
    >Yes, that is a lung injury. It has nothing to do with the bends. And, when you are not breathing
    >compressed air, your lungs cannot expand further than they were extended when you took the breath
    >you are holding.

    Unless of course we jettison him into outer space or form a vacuum bubble over the pool.

    <More Snipage>

    ~Matt

    >martin
    >
    >--
    >Martin Smith email: [email protected] Vollsveien 9 tel. : +47 6783 1188
    >P.O. Box 482 mob. : +47 932 48 303 1327 Lysaker, Norway
     
  8. MJuric wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 04 Sep 2003 10:04:35 +0200, "Martin W. Smith" <[email protected]> wrote: <Snippage>
    > >
    > >Yes, that is a lung injury. It has nothing to do with the bends. And, when you are not breathing
    > >compressed air, your lungs cannot expand further than they were extended when you took the breath
    > >you are holding.
    >
    > Unless of course we jettison him into outer space or form a vacuum bubble over the pool.

    You can get the bends if you fly too soon after scuba diving, even if your dive was not deep, if you
    were down for a long time. People who go scuba diving while on holiday should not dive on their last
    day before flying.

    martin

    --
    Draft Wesley Clark for President! www.DraftWesleyClark.com

    Martin Smith email: [email protected]
     
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