Unpopular Cure For Plantar Fasciitis

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jack, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. Jack

    Jack Guest

    Yeah I stretched the soleus and gastrocnemius religiously and wore a
    special night sock frequently. Used ice, massage, NSAIDS, and toe
    curls to a lesser extent. Always wore heel cups or some other
    recommended insert.

    But I'm convinced that those treatments had minimal effect and the
    thing that cured this bitch of a disease was rest, and for me that
    meant NO running and minimal walking over a 6-week period.

    Used a ski machine as a substitute but even *that* irritated the heel
    and had to be severely curtailed.

    My apologies to all you purists out there but you are not going to run
    your way through plantar fasciitis, even if you follow all of the
    other recommended treatment modalities.

    Jack
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sat, 11 Mar 2006 13:53:54 GMT, [email protected] (Jack) wrote:

    >and wore a
    >special night sock frequently


    Where'd you find a sock small enough to fit your 2" penis?
     
  3. Jack wrote:
    > Yeah I stretched the soleus and gastrocnemius religiously and wore a
    > special night sock frequently. Used ice, massage, NSAIDS, and toe
    > curls to a lesser extent. Always wore heel cups or some other
    > recommended insert.
    >
    > But I'm convinced that those treatments had minimal effect and the
    > thing that cured this bitch of a disease was rest, and for me that
    > meant NO running and minimal walking over a 6-week period.
    >
    > Used a ski machine as a substitute but even *that* irritated the heel
    > and had to be severely curtailed.
    >
    > My apologies to all you purists out there but you are not going to run
    > your way through plantar fasciitis, even if you follow all of the
    > other recommended treatment modalities.
    >
    > Jack


    Where does it say to "run through" an injury ? Rest is the key , if
    only I would not run or train for say 4 weeks I'm sure any lasting
    niggles from my injury would dissappear.
     
  4. OldGoat

    OldGoat Guest

    Dear Jack,

    I am not real up to speed on foot ailments, but the way it sounds, a period
    of rest and being very easy with weight bearing activities should be
    helpful. Elevate it, soak it, maybe tape it and go with a crutch or at the
    least a cane, for a while, to assist with the weight bearing on normal
    activities, couldn't hurt.
    As it seems you're living to run, rather than running to live,, if you truly
    enjoy the activity that much, a visit to a podiatrist and a foot X-ray might
    give you a measure of piece of mind, knowing further damage is not a risk. 3
    X your body weight every time you land on that foot could do all kinds of
    nasty things, and better to waste the bucks for a doctors appointment than
    take a chance of sacrificing something you love to do. There aren't many
    things people enjoy doing in life that aren't illegal, immoral or fattening.
    Do all you must to keep this activity safe for you, even if it means taking
    a little time off from it.

    Best Wishes for a speedy recovery--og





    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Yeah I stretched the soleus and gastrocnemius religiously and wore a
    > special night sock frequently. Used ice, massage, NSAIDS, and toe
    > curls to a lesser extent. Always wore heel cups or some other
    > recommended insert.
    >
    > But I'm convinced that those treatments had minimal effect and the
    > thing that cured this bitch of a disease was rest, and for me that
    > meant NO running and minimal walking over a 6-week period.
    >
    > Used a ski machine as a substitute but even *that* irritated the heel
    > and had to be severely curtailed.
    >
    > My apologies to all you purists out there but you are not going to run
    > your way through plantar fasciitis, even if you follow all of the
    > other recommended treatment modalities.
    >
    > Jack
     
  5. Beach Runner

    Beach Runner Guest

    Better than an x-ray, find a good podiatrist with an ultra sound
    machine. That can look at soft tissue.

    Find other activities while it's healing, or it wont.
     
  6. userfriendly

    userfriendly Guest

    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    :
    : Yeah I stretched the soleus and gastrocnemius religiously and wore a
    : special night sock frequently. Used ice, massage, NSAIDS, and toe
    : curls to a lesser extent. Always wore heel cups or some other
    : recommended insert.
    :
    : But I'm convinced that those treatments had minimal effect and the
    : thing that cured this bitch of a disease was rest, and for me that
    : meant NO running and minimal walking over a 6-week period.
    :
    : Used a ski machine as a substitute but even *that* irritated the heel
    : and had to be severely curtailed.
    :
    : My apologies to all you purists out there but you are not going to run
    : your way through plantar fasciitis, even if you follow all of the
    : other recommended treatment modalities.
    :
    : Jack

    While I appreciate what you're saying, I also dealt with Plantar Fasciitis.
    I decided NOT to forego running, cycling and standing/walking around.
    Instead, I did the night splints a bit (not much), wore shoes around the
    house instead of going barefoot, stretched just a bit, wore a heel cup in my
    walking shoes and used ice every night for 20 minutes.

    I DID run my way through Plantar Fasciitis, just as my orthopaedist said I
    would. It took a year, but the pain was minimal and I much preferred that
    to the "6 week off" period that you are advocating.

    The point, though, is this: because ceasing all running activities worked
    for you, you are saying that's the only thing that will work for everyone
    else. Truth is, we're all different. If not running worked for you and you
    prefer that, great. I preferred to run through it. Don't tell me what will
    and will not work for me based on the limited experience of one guy who
    didn't get results as quickly as he wanted using other modalities. It's
    that kind of arrogance that will keep you from being able to learn from the
    experiences of others. It'll keep you intellectually immature.
     
  7. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "userfriendly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The point, though, is this: because ceasing all running activities
    > worked
    > for you, you are saying that's the only thing that will work for
    > everyone
    > else. Truth is, we're all different. If not running worked for you
    > and you
    > prefer that, great. I preferred to run through it. Don't tell me
    > what will
    > and will not work for me based on the limited experience of one guy
    > who
    > didn't get results as quickly as he wanted using other modalities.
    > It's
    > that kind of arrogance that will keep you from being able to learn
    > from the
    > experiences of others. It'll keep you intellectually immature.



    You are both correct in treatment. Understand PF is the name of general
    diagnosis of a problem with the fascia. The degree of injury or
    placement can vary widely. Because of the variability of injuries and
    problems, solutions also vary. So yes, some people can run through it
    and others have to completely stop or some combination of the two plus
    the night splints, etc. etc. The real pain in the ass, metaphorically
    speaking, is finding what will work for you, which sad to say, takes
    time and runners hate down time. For starters and only a opinion, if
    you know you are a slow healer in general, then I would suggest a
    conservative approach. If a fast healer, try a more aggressive approach

    -DF
     
  8. Charrlygrl1

    Charrlygrl1 Guest

    The latest edition of "Arthritis Today' put out by The Arthritis
    Foundation, says take two weeks of rest, then walk or run it off.
    I say BULL!! I've suffered with a horrid case of PF along with pain in
    the balls of my feet and in both ankles. (I have ankylosing
    spondylitis, a fun erosive arthritis which affects the spine,
    peripheral joints, and points of tendon insertion into bone).

    >From the medical encylopedia on line:

    Enthesis
    the site of attachment of a tendon or ligament to bone. The enthesis
    consists of four zones: the tendon, unmineralized fibrocartilage,
    mineralized fibrocartilage and lamellar bone. Entheses are
    metabolically active and are nourished by blood supply from the
    peritenon, perichondrium and periosteum.
    Entheses are involved in a number of inflammatory, traumatic and
    degenerative processes (enthesitis or enthesopathy).

    Radiographically detectable bone excrescences may occur in various
    degenerative disorders; these bone outgrowths are termed enthesophytes
    or spurs.

    I truly do think how to get rid of PF depends on what is causing the
    PF.


    I tried everything to make it go away...nothing worked. The stretches
    helped for all of about 2 seconds, then the pain was right back.
    The only thing that helped me with it was working with my arthritis med
    combinations. Finally Enbrel, azulfidine, prednisone, and injectable
    MTX got it under control.
    PF is a bitch, no doubt about it.
    I'm glad that you found something that works for you,
    Char
     
  9. Jack

    Jack Guest

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:25:06 GMT, "Doug Freese" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >You are both correct in treatment. Understand PF is the name of general
    >diagnosis of a problem with the fascia. The degree of injury or
    >placement can vary widely. Because of the variability of injuries and
    >problems, solutions also vary. So yes, some people can run through it
    >and others have to completely stop or some combination of the two plus
    >the night splints, etc. etc. The real pain in the ass, metaphorically
    >speaking, is finding what will work for you, which sad to say, takes
    >time and runners hate down time. For starters and only a opinion, if
    >you know you are a slow healer in general, then I would suggest a
    >conservative approach. If a fast healer, try a more aggressive approach
    >
    >-DF


    That's true. I "ran through it" for years without doing *any* kind of
    treatment or adjustment and yet it stayed mild, but when it flared in
    late January, man I was lucky to hobble. I simply don't believe that
    the icing, stretching, night splint, massage,etc. had any effect on
    improvement. Abstinence was the ticket.

    Ironically, I tore a lateral knee meniscus two months earlier and that
    had no effect on running, only on crouching. Surgery for partial
    removal 2/24.

    The damn PF was more disabling than the cartilage damage.

    At 62, it's all catching up to me; you just don't heal the same way.
    Other egs, in the past yr. a strained neck/trapezius from bench
    presses took 6 months before becoming pain-free and the rotator cuffs
    and bicipital tendons are chronically sore. Everything has seemed to
    collapse at once like a pre-programmed genetic destruction.



    _____________________




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  10. What are you, a lil girlie or something?

    On 13 Mar 2006 08:28:45 -0800, "Charrlygrl1" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >The latest edition of "Arthritis Today' put out by The Arthritis
    >Foundation, says take two weeks of rest, then walk or run it off.
    >I say BULL!! I've suffered with a horrid case of PF along with pain in
    >the balls of my feet and in both ankles. (I have ankylosing
    >spondylitis, a fun erosive arthritis which affects the spine,
    >peripheral joints, and points of tendon insertion into bone).
    >
    >>From the medical encylopedia on line:

    >Enthesis
    >the site of attachment of a tendon or ligament to bone. The enthesis
    >consists of four zones: the tendon, unmineralized fibrocartilage,
    >mineralized fibrocartilage and lamellar bone. Entheses are
    >metabolically active and are nourished by blood supply from the
    >peritenon, perichondrium and periosteum.
    >Entheses are involved in a number of inflammatory, traumatic and
    >degenerative processes (enthesitis or enthesopathy).
    >
    >Radiographically detectable bone excrescences may occur in various
    >degenerative disorders; these bone outgrowths are termed enthesophytes
    >or spurs.
    >
    >I truly do think how to get rid of PF depends on what is causing the
    >PF.
    >
    >
    >I tried everything to make it go away...nothing worked. The stretches
    >helped for all of about 2 seconds, then the pain was right back.
    >The only thing that helped me with it was working with my arthritis med
    >combinations. Finally Enbrel, azulfidine, prednisone, and injectable
    >MTX got it under control.
    >PF is a bitch, no doubt about it.
    >I'm glad that you found something that works for you,
    >Char
     
  11. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    "Jack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > At 62, it's all catching up to me; you just don't heal the same way.
    > Other egs, in the past yr. a strained neck/trapezius from bench
    > presses took 6 months before becoming pain-free and the rotator cuffs
    > and bicipital tendons are chronically sore. Everything has seemed to
    > collapse at once like a pre-programmed genetic destruction.


    We can't pick our parents. :)

    -DF
     
  12. On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 23:57:34 GMT, "Doug Freese" <[email protected]rr.com>
    wrote:

    >We can't pick our parents. :)


    Mine sure dumped me fast though. They say one look at me, and mom
    passed back out, and pops headed for the door never to be seen again.

    -DF
     
  13. userfriendly

    userfriendly Guest

    "Doug Freese" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:6hfRf.16307$4%[email protected]
    :
    : "userfriendly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    : news:[email protected]
    : > The point, though, is this: because ceasing all running activities
    : > worked
    : > for you, you are saying that's the only thing that will work for
    : > everyone
    : > else. Truth is, we're all different. If not running worked for you
    : > and you
    : > prefer that, great. I preferred to run through it. Don't tell me
    : > what will
    : > and will not work for me based on the limited experience of one guy
    : > who
    : > didn't get results as quickly as he wanted using other modalities.
    : > It's
    : > that kind of arrogance that will keep you from being able to learn
    : > from the
    : > experiences of others. It'll keep you intellectually immature.
    :
    :
    : You are both correct in treatment. Understand PF is the name of general
    : diagnosis of a problem with the fascia. The degree of injury or
    : placement can vary widely. Because of the variability of injuries and
    : problems, solutions also vary. So yes, some people can run through it
    : and others have to completely stop or some combination of the two plus
    : the night splints, etc. etc. The real pain in the ass, metaphorically
    : speaking, is finding what will work for you, which sad to say, takes
    : time and runners hate down time. For starters and only a opinion, if
    : you know you are a slow healer in general, then I would suggest a
    : conservative approach. If a fast healer, try a more aggressive approach
    :
    : -DF

    Agreed, Doug! It's not a "my way is the only way" approach. Thanks for
    summarizing the balance and individuality I was trying to bring across.
     
  14. jgs

    jgs Guest

    I think Userfriendly is right. You need to find what is right for you.
    For my nagging PF, I know that the "toe off" in my running, or the
    running hills is what makes the PF flair up.
    If I can use the Night Splint (30 - 45 mins) to get stretched and run
    flatfooted in the hills I can keep things under control. I have gone
    through complete recovery, just to flair up again once normal activity
    is resumed.
    I find that taping the arch, using a night splint, custom Orthotics
    rolling a soup can underfoot keep me running and pain free - I am
    never far from a flare up. I have learned to live with it.
    /john
     
  15. Jack

    Jack Guest

    On 14 Mar 2006 05:15:08 -0800, "jgs" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think Userfriendly is right. You need to find what is right for you.
    >For my nagging PF, I know that the "toe off" in my running, or the
    >running hills is what makes the PF flair up.
    >If I can use the Night Splint (30 - 45 mins) to get stretched and run
    >flatfooted in the hills I can keep things under control. I have gone
    >through complete recovery, just to flair up again once normal activity
    >is resumed.
    >I find that taping the arch, using a night splint, custom Orthotics
    >rolling a soup can underfoot keep me running and pain free - I am
    >never far from a flare up. I have learned to live with it.
    >/john


    Lots of folks swear by taping but very few know how to do it properly.

    Especially someone like me who is all thumbs.

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  16. Beach Runner

    Beach Runner Guest

    For what it's worth, all the football teams have magnetic pulse therapy
    machines. My old internist had one, and found insurance companies
    wouldn't pay for it. At the time, I had a stress fracture that's
    wouldn't heal, inspite of even a walking cast. 12 sessions with that and
    it healed.

    On the other hand, I used a podiatrist recently, who had a ultra sound
    viewing, to see exactly what was going on. While he did shoot some
    cortisone, he regularly shot some king of stuff to flush it out.
     
  17. Baxter

    Baxter Guest

    "Doug Freese" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:6hfRf.16307$4%[email protected]
    >
    >>

    >
    > You are both correct in treatment. Understand PF is the name of general
    > diagnosis of a problem with the fascia. The degree of injury or
    > placement can vary widely. Because of the variability of injuries and
    > problems, solutions also vary. So yes, some people can run through it
    > and others have to completely stop or some combination of the two plus
    > the night splints, etc. etc. The real pain in the ass, metaphorically
    > speaking, is finding what will work for you, which sad to say, takes
    > time and runners hate down time. For starters and only a opinion, if
    > you know you are a slow healer in general, then I would suggest a
    > conservative approach. If a fast healer, try a more aggressive approach
    >

    I was diagnosed with PF and other foot problems. Wore special orthotics for
    years. Did all the exercises. Pain never went away until I stopped eating
    potatoes. Clear to me that there can be many causes for your foot
    problems - and not all of them are below the knee.
     
  18. jgs

    jgs Guest

    I keep it simple.
    I place my heel on a can or tuck my foot up on the bench I am sitting
    on - just so that the foot is flexed. I put 1-2 wraps of tape around
    (snugly) the arch. Don't go too tight, when you put weight on the foot
    it will expand against the tape.
    I place it high enough up the foot to support the arch but not so high
    that it sits where the foot and ankle begin to flex.
    So probably not quite as far up the foot as your shoes lace. You just
    don't want the tape where it tugs at the skin.
    You have to play with it - watch for blisters. If you do get a small
    blister - just take a tag end of tape and place it dry side down on the
    blister and tape over it. They go away in a few days.
    I like the Johnson & Johnson Coach tape. It is well ventilated,
    flexible and pulls off nicely.

    Be advised, I came up with this on my own but it works for me.
    Free advice is worth every penny you pay for it.

    Good luck.
    /john
     
  19. Sanchona

    Sanchona Guest

    Lurker unlurking momentarily. :)

    Two years ago I was diagnosed with PF and my doctor said only exercise
    and good support shoes would clear my problem.

    Yes, I rolled a empty fly-spray can with my affected foot, and took to
    wearing support shoes. I also cut up my old soft sheepskin ankle boots
    to make a soft support pile for the arch of my foot. It took some
    months, but the pain went away and I've stopped using my support shoes
    and stopped exercising (I hate exercising in any form!)

    I'm ever ready to take up the exercise and use the support shoes at the
    slightest twinge of pain. So far I've been lucky.

    I thought I'd share my experience. :)

    All right, back to lurking.


    --
    Sanchona
    [email protected]
    http://synchona.tripod.com/index.html


    First Novel: "A Family Of Strangers" will be published
    by Five Star Publishing end of 2006
     
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