Update - 10 years off the bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Dave_G, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Dave_G

    Dave_G New Member

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    With a bit of luck this message may help to encourage a few of you out here to get back out on the bike! As previously posted it is 10 years since I have actively ridden my bike. I decided to start to ride the bike in early January after my Doctor had told me my BP needed long-term medication to keep it stable. Well, I was a stone overweight, didn't smoke or drink too much and was advised to exercise.

    Now three months into riding the bike, I have dropped 10 pounds, my resting heart rate is the lowest its been in a decade AND yes my BP is down at 130/80 WITHOUT medication - so forget the beta blockers, ace inhibitors or calcium channel blocckers - dust of the bike, put on your lycra and get some miles in.

    All my aches and pains that I had during the early days of riding - knees, neck, wrists etc etc... have all gone. I'm not the 'well oiled' racing machine I was years ago, but what I am is a rapidly approaching 40 year old cyclist who enjoys riding the bike once again.

    To use a well know strap line - Just Do It... Get out on the bike.
     
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  2. bikeback

    bikeback New Member

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    Congratulations Dave. I am now 54 and bought a bike last year after over 20 years away. It felt good getting some conditioning back as I rode the hills in the rural area I now live in. My back "went out" after a 40 mile ride however and it took months to heal. Stress probably prolonged things.
    I just went out and rode for about 10 minutes, hoping to get back gradually. Thanks for your note.
     
  3. dustino7

    dustino7 New Member

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    Nice :) I'm glad getting back into it has stuck for you!

    I've only been away from hardcore BMX riding for about 5 1/2 years now.... but rough and fat as hell. I raced at about 150-160lbs..... weighing in at 225 now. yikes!!! I'm not a super small dude anymore, but i should still be under 200 most likely.

    I hope getting back into it has the same effect on me that it did on you!
     
  4. ccorrick

    ccorrick New Member

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    Good to hear!

    I remember posting right along beside you. I'm back on since the last week of November after 4 years off.

    Like you all the aches and pains are gone.(still fighting a hamstring, but it's better). I'm feeling great. Haven't even bothered with a HR monitor yet, but my resting has dropped about 8-10bpm and my BP is down to on the low side of normal instead of the high side. Saturday I had a nice hard 50 miler with a local club and managed a 20.2mph average!! I'm shocked at how much better I feel and how much I WANT to ride now. I can't wait to get off work to ride. It's changed my whole attitude about a lot of things (for the better).

    I agree, get out there and do it! You'll love it just as much as you ever did...
     
  5. lischoux

    lischoux New Member

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    Congratulations Dave ! Since everyone is posting their success stories, let me add mine.

    Yeah I'm "only" 32 but I've had a weight problem all my life. Living in Luxembourg (Europe) I started cycling in 1988 (17 yrs old) and basically kept it going for 2 years. Did 2000-3000 km's a year (which was ok for a guy who never was into sports). Then I got my car and my bikes basically became cumbersome things that cluttered the garage and/or my room.

    When I went to College (Ohio, USA) a buddy of mine convinced me to buy a bike. Since I had not ridden in 7 yrs I was grossly out of shape and never found the spark to stick with it either. The 600€ thing I purchased in the States actually got used to hang various clothing articles on and was a nice conversation piece in my apartment... but it only saw the road for about 300 km's in 4 years.

    Getting back to Lux after college I brought the bike (a nice Trek) with me, but it served the same purpose as in the US.... until 2001.

    At the time I had 2 bikes that I did not use... Since a buddy of mine had a b-day coming up I decided the difference btw 2 bikes not being used... and 1 bike not being used was: "More space in the apartment". So I gave 1 of them to him with the words "Hey, we should go riding sometimes..."

    3 months later in March 2002 it finally was the case and we headed out for a 30 minute ride on a cycling track(road) in Luxembourg.

    We then decided to go again a couple of days later, but the weather turned bad and it drizzled and looked not very inviting to get out there and ride... But somehow we went and when we were riding side by side my buddy said the magic words "I completely forgot the joy you get from cycling". Boom ! That was the moment where those lethargic, pizza-eating, pipe-and-cigar-smoking, do-nothing days that had produced a thick shield against any form of physical exercise were pierced.

    True, in the first days and weeks you hurt a lot, actually there were places on your body where a muscle resided that was aching, and you did not really know you had a muscle there. You basically crawled out of bed in the morning, aching, hurting... Swearing that "tonight, you will do absolutely N O T H I N G !" Then got to work and slowly your body felt normal again... and at 2:00 PM you started counting the minutes, seconds before work was over and you could race home, change into your cycling garb (which at the time in 2002 still consisted of a PDM chamois that I bought in 1988 !!!) load the bike in your car, get to the track and get cracking !

    I enjoyed EVERY SINGLE DAY on the bike since. I've ridden through snow and hail storms, rain and blistering sun. I flatted a bunch of times, mainly because the tire and tubes were rotten, I learned how to fix a flat, change a chain and bunny-hop onto the sidewalk.

    I crashed a couple of times but not before I bought a helmet... That one actually got cracked in a crash and I've never ridden without a protective shell around my cabessa since.

    I went to see the cardiologist and had a bunch of tests done last year. Waiting for a re-test this year and anxious to see on paper how my heart and my circulatory system have responded to the daily physical pounding.

    If you check out my other posts, you'll see that I am currently thinking about serious goals: Riding real mountains and (maybe) joining the Masters, going to the World Masters in Edmonton 2005.

    I now live in Canada, a choice of location ALSO made because of the cycling possibilities and bought 2 brand-new TREK's, a trainer and a bunch of accessories. The PDM garb has long been replaced by US-POSTAL garb, even bought a retro 7-Eleven jersey (that reminds me of one of my favorite movies of all time... American Flyers!)

    Cycling is so much fun and for me it has become much more than a sport. I am addicted to the thing and could not live without it. Cycling is life, the rest is just details. "I completely forgot the joy you get from cycling".

    Cheerio and Let's RIDE !
     
  6. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Good for you my friend - I really enjoyed reading your story and yes, I can concur with the moment when the light goes on and you realise that you (we) should never have stopped cycling in the first place !
     
  7. hoppers

    hoppers New Member

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    Well done Dave and the other guys,

    My story is similar. I'm 44 and got back on the bike last August after about 10 years off. Started with about 30-40km per week with lots of aches and pains in my legs and gradually increased it.
    The aches disappeared after a few weeks and I also started to watch what I ate and cut out sugar.

    Seven months later I've gone from 117kg (257 pounds) to 93kg (205 pounds) and am now riding about 250km per week easily. Rewarded myself with a new bike (Felt F60 - very nice) and can hang on at 35kmh in 40km races.

    Have never felt better. Do yourself a favour and go for it.
     
  8. rhysd

    rhysd New Member

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    Thanks for the inspiration Lischoux! I've never really stopped recreational riding although I haven't raced in 30 years (I'm now 43) but since moving to Melbourne 10 years ago I sold my road bike (an old Giant Cadex) and bought a couple of MTBs (currently have a Specialized FSR with a blown rear shock - help!). Problem was that I never pushed myself on the MTB so I have just bought a new roadie (well kind of - it's an Avanti Blade Comp).

    Only been riding again for about a month and had a real hard one (for me) on Monday 60kms at about 28kmh average. Tuesday I thought I would roll the legs over to keep out the aches but of course tried chasing down the guy in front (you know the one with the chiselled, shaved calves and tri-bars) and ended up doing another 40kms into a headwind at about 30-35 kmh. I swore I would have a day off today but I'm starting to think another session might be the best way to go.

    Any recommendations about what a good ride for someone with very tired legs should do on a wednesday arvo?
     
  9. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Judging from what you've said, you base fitness is pretty high.
    But don't succumb to the temptation of going out again and blasting - no matter how good you feel !!!!!
    I was in the same boat but I made the mistake of oushing too hard too soon and it doesn't pay.
    Do a recovery ride - one hour max.
    If you feel good tomorrow then do what you had planned to do today !
     
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