Update from the chicken girly newbie (longish)

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Gwen Morse, Apr 19, 2003.

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  1. Gwen Morse

    Gwen Morse Guest

    After not getting to ride for two weeks because the weather wasn't permitting, I've ridden three
    times this week (Mon, Fri, Sat). I'm going to ride again on Sunday, too. Here's an update on my last
    two rides:

    I took my bike to the bike shop, yesterday, to get the chain tightened. It's been falling off every
    time I go riding, once a ride. The bike shop owner tightened it and said I need to get the gear
    cables tightened, too, but, that I could bring it in next week. That was good because I wanted to
    hit the trails and didn't want to wait any longer.

    I went mountain biking yesterday afternoon. I'd meant to go in the morning, but, "stuff" came up and
    I went just before work (and after getting the chain adjusted). I had a great ride, although nothing
    particularly stood out in my head, other than there was nothing negative. No falls. No wrong turns.
    I climbed a few hills and failed a few climbs.

    I reset my Cat Eye odometer computer before that ride and it stopped working, entirely. Hmm. I
    wonder if it has something to do with getting the chain tightened.

    Today, I went out and met my friend Mike to go biking. I've been working since March trying to get
    him to go with me. My persistence finally paid off. We pre-scheduled to meet at 9:30 am.

    I timed my arrival so I would be just a few minutes early. 9:28. Perfect. Given that I'm "always
    late", I've been working on improving my arrival time to things. It's been a tough struggle, but,
    it's gradually improving. I used to be half an hour late to things. Then, fifteen minutes. These
    days, I'm usually no more than 5 minutes late, and quite often "on time". Early still seems to be
    beyond me, however.

    This time, Mike was late, not me. I'll gladly gloat from my moral high ground about that one. Mike's
    never been mountain biking on a trail, only riding bikes on roads. He's been road biking on his
    brother's mountain bike, while he tried to figure out what sort of bike he wants to buy for himself.
    So, after a few quick explanations "Try this, try that, worry about this, don't worry about
    that"...we both set off.

    The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually* get up it now, but, there's
    some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I can't get "around" them on one side.
    Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb from
    where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb. Not only
    did I look like I "couldn't" climb, but, Mike was following right behind me and had to stop, too. I
    think he learned his lesson after that, because he stayed further back on the remaining hills. We
    sort of tooled along for a bit. I started out going slow because I didn't know what Mike would be
    comfortable with, but, after a bit I speeded up. Sadly, he didn't actually *notice* this, and he
    thought I was setting a baby-slow pace for him the whole way I led the trail. I admitted when the
    ride was over that that's just the pace I set on my own.

    There's a double hill that gives me trouble. I have alot of trouble climbing the first hill, but, I
    can climb the second one. I couldn't remember *where* it was. It turns out it was at least a mile
    later than I thought it was. Ooops! When we found it and got past both hills (we both failed to
    climb the first and both succeeded on the second), I tried to get him to go ahead of me. No go. But,
    a bit after was a point where he just ended up ahead of me, and I stayed back when he tried to wave
    me forward. I mastered this highly subtle technique from my hiking partner, Fred. Fred's done this
    to give me confidence when I'm doing tough hikes. Mike had seen me follow the trail markers, and
    he'd seen the "worst" of the climbs, so, there was nothing he couldn't deal with up ahead.

    I have to say, he lit out like a donkey with his tail on fire. I don't know if he's been eating his
    Wheaties or what, but, he was just zooming along. So, of course, not wanting to be the candyassed
    girl who was left behind, I tried to match my pace with his. *AND I DID IT*. This just goes to show
    I *was* being candyassed all along about my speed.

    There was nothing too significant for a good part of the hike, except that Mike tried riding over a
    log obstacle and *almost* fell on his ass. And, he complained about some jouncy bits of the trail,
    so, I offered to switch seats (I have an ergonomic gel seat), but, our seatposts were different
    sizes by like a millimeter or two, which meant it couldn't happen.

    But, the true beauty was when we were working our way down the extended final descent, and Mike
    suddenly swerved to one side, and then his bike went to the right, and his body flipped over the
    handlebars to the left.

    I'm a bit ashamed to report that my first thought was "Gosh, I wish I had my camera" and only my
    SECOND was to wonder if he was "okay". He was. He was actually laughing over it. I'm a bit amazed
    that he was undamaged by the fall (as was his brother's bike) because both of them were entangled in
    four trees that were close together. How his head or joints avoided contact with all of them is a
    mystery worthy of Sherlock Holmes.

    A bit further along the same descent, I was able to get into proper "attack position", and not fall
    (or even just feel "wobbly") for several seconds. I think all the responses from people in the group
    helped. I have alot of trouble with this, so, I'm proud to have been able to do it at all.

    My computer still wasn't working. I might bring my bike in tomorrow. The battery's not dead -- the
    numbers are still there. They just don't change. I think maybe a wire is loose somewhere.

    Mike and I are supposed to meet again tomorrow for another ride. He wants to do the loop twice. I
    think he's hooked :).

    Gwen

    --
    Gwen Morse -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= "Love is a snowmobile racing
    across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels
    come." -- Matt Groening
     
    Tags:


  2. Gwen says:

    <snip>

    >Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb from
    >where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.

    <more snip>

    Gwen, don't feel stupid at any point, unless you really have been a dork ;-) We all start somewhere,
    and many of us are not too far away from where you are now. The trick is to try to remember what
    worked and what didn't and keep adjusting the techniques until it all works. And keep riding.

    Steve
     
  3. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Gwen Morse wrote:

    <snipped>
    >>
    > I reset my Cat Eye odometer computer before that ride and it stopped working, entirely. Hmm. I
    > wonder if it has something to do with getting the chain tightened.

    porpbably the front sensor got bumped.
    > >
    >> The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually*
    > get up it now, but, there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I can't
    > get "around" them on one side. Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time.

    suggestion: depending on the condtion of your trail... going around isn't always a good
    choice, contributes to cheater routes around things and widein of the trail. But it amy
    already be like that....

    However, I was able to
    > restart my climb from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way.

    way to go!!

    But, a bit after was a
    > point where he just ended up ahead of me, and I stayed back when he tried to wave me forward. I
    > mastered this highly subtle technique from my hiking partner, Fred. Fred's done this to give me
    > confidence when I'm doing tough hikes. Mike had seen me follow the trail markers, and he'd seen
    > the "worst" of the climbs, so, there was nothing he couldn't deal with up ahead.
    >
    > I have to say, he lit out like a donkey with his tail on fire. I don't know if he's been eating
    > his Wheaties or what, but, he was just zooming along. So, of course, not wanting to be the
    > candyassed girl who was left behind, I tried to match my pace with his. *AND I DID IT*. This just
    > goes to show I *was* being candyassed all along about my speed.

    way to go again!!!
    >
    > There was nothing too significant for a good part of the hike, except that Mike tried riding over
    > a log obstacle and *almost* fell on his ass. And, he complained about some jouncy bits of the
    > trail, so, I offered to switch seats (I have an ergonomic gel seat), but, our seatposts were
    > different sizes by like a millimeter or two, which meant it couldn't happen.
    >
    > But, the true beauty was when we were working our way down the extended final descent, and Mike
    > suddenly swerved to one side, and then his bike went to the right, and his body flipped over the
    > handlebars to the left.
    >
    > I'm a bit ashamed to report that my first thought was "Gosh, I wish I had my camera" and only my
    > SECOND was to wonder if he was "okay".

    heh, what are friends for?

    >
    > A bit further along the same descent, I was able to get into proper "attack position", and not
    > fall (or even just feel "wobbly") for several seconds. I think all the responses from people
    > in the group helped. I have alot of trouble with this, so, I'm proud to have been able to do
    > it at all.
    >

    go grrl!!
    > Mike and I are supposed to meet again tomorrow for another ride. He wants to do the loop twice. I
    > think he's hooked :).
    >

    fun RR... sounds like you are hooked too!!

    Penny
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Gwen says:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > >Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb from
    > >where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    >
    > <more snip>
    >
    > Gwen, don't feel stupid at any point, unless you really have been a dork ;-) We all start
    > somewhere, and many of us are not too far away from where you are now. The trick is to try to
    > remember what worked and what didn't and keep adjusting the techniques until it all works. And
    > keep riding.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >
    >

    Another trick is to remember that riding techniques posted here will almost always need to be
    adapted to your own personal riding style.

    For instance, one way i have found to improve hill climbing, is to first find a moderate climb. get
    used to it in your favorite hill climbing gear for about 4 - 5 rides (by ride as a unit, i refer to
    each individual riding session, not looping over the same trail section). then, when you feel
    comfortable (depending on your body's strength/endurance building speed), start taking the climb in
    one gear higher on the rear cogs. after you get used to this, repeat steps.

    I have found, there is a limit to this though. once you begin to provide a lot of power to the
    pedals, the chain jumping links (some may call it skipping, or slipping) will be much more common,
    though if your gears are fairly new, unlike mine, then you may not have this problem.

    And remember, performance training can only be done at your own pace as like fingerprints, nobody
    develops performance the same way, or at the same rate.

    One person told me that using a stair-master can help, though i have not tried it. I have tried
    stationary bikes, and i must say, after riding a real bike, a stationary just doesn't have the same
    resistance. i found myself constantly adjusting the tension pad.

    And the most important thing, though you may already know, is to have fun.

    ~Travis
    --
    To reply by email, remove clothes.

    travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronic, Owner/Founder/Developer
    (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
  5. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 22:10:16 -0400, Gwen Morse wrote:

    > The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually* get up it now, but,
    > there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I can't get "around" them
    > on one side.

    Aside from the badness of trail-widening that Penny mentioned, trying to get around the side will
    often cause you to have to make precarious turns in the middle of an already-difficult climb.
    Sometimes just going right up the middle is more effective. Gather as much speed as you can, pop up
    the front wheel a bit (very easy to do on a steep uphill), and lunge forward to get the back wheel
    over the root. If its a really long climb, use the easier parts to slow down and catch your
    breath...you'll need momentum to get up the steeper sections.

    > Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb
    > from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    > Not only did I look like I "couldn't" climb, but, Mike was following right behind me and had to
    > stop, too.

    It always makes me feel bad to hold people up, but often it just gives them an excuse to walk
    something that they wouldn't have made anyway!

    > There's a double hill that gives me trouble. I have alot of trouble climbing the first hill, but,
    > I can climb the second one. I couldn't remember *where* it was. It turns out it was at least a
    > mile later than I thought it was.

    I had to grin about this part; I do that all the time. I know the hill is just ahead *somewhere*,
    and end up tooling down the trail at a snail's pace for quite awhile waiting for that hill.

    Climbing steep hills is a skill that is developed over time. There's a whole lot more to it that
    just being in shape. You might want to Google for some of the climbing threads. Many of us tend to
    really get into the climbing aspect of MTBing; any damn fool can go downhill.

    > I'm a bit ashamed to report that my first thought was "Gosh, I wish I had my camera" and only my
    > SECOND was to wonder if he was "okay". He was. He was actually laughing over it. I'm a bit amazed
    > that he was undamaged by the fall (as was his brother's bike) because both of them were entangled
    > in four trees that were close together. How his head or joints avoided contact with all of them is
    > a mystery worthy of Sherlock Holmes.

    Always glad when everyone's OK. It has always amazed me the beating that these bikes can take.

    > A bit further along the same descent, I was able to get into proper "attack position", and not
    > fall (or even just feel "wobbly") for several seconds. I think all the responses from people
    > in the group helped. I have alot of trouble with this, so, I'm proud to have been able to do
    > it at all.

    Cool! It feels really good to get comfortable with parts that used to be tough, doesn't it?

    > My computer still wasn't working. I might bring my bike in tomorrow. The battery's not dead -- the
    > numbers are still there. They just don't change. I think maybe a wire is loose somewhere.

    Gotta agree with Penny on this one. The sensor on your fork can get bumped, and often does if you
    take the front wheel off. If its too far from the magnet, it'll just stop working. I try to check
    mine before every ride to make sure it notices the magnet passing by.

    > Mike and I are supposed to meet again tomorrow for another ride. He wants to do the loop twice. I
    > think he's hooked :).

    Oh yeah, if he was smiling after that crash, he's hooked!

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail address, at least)
     
  6. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Gwen Morse wrote:
    > >> The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually*
    > > get up it now, but, there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I
    > > can't get "around" them on one side. Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time.
    >
    >
    > suggestion: depending on the condtion of your trail... going around isn't always a good choice,
    > contributes to cheater routes around things and widein of the trail. But it amy already be like
    > that....

    Suggestion? The rule states that if you can't ride it, walk it. Widening trails just so you don't
    have to get off of the bike to walk something you can't ride is lazy and irresponsible.

    JD who's amy?
     
  7. Gwen Morse

    Gwen Morse Guest

    On 20 Apr 2003 11:13:52 GMT, [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:

    >Gwen says:
    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >>Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb from
    >>where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    >
    ><more snip>
    >
    >Gwen, don't feel stupid at any point, unless you really have been a dork ;-) We all start
    >somewhere, and many of us are not too far away from where you are now. The trick is to try to
    >remember what worked and what didn't and keep

    Hmm. I'm not finding many of them writing posts here :). <heh>. I'll have to comb through more
    carefully.

    Gwen

    --
    Gwen Morse -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= "Love is a snowmobile racing
    across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels
    come." -- Matt Groening
     
  8. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On 20 Apr 2003 11:13:52 GMT, [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:
    >
    > >Gwen says:
    > >
    > ><snip>
    > >
    > >>Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb
    > >>from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    > >
    > ><more snip>
    > >
    > >Gwen, don't feel stupid at any point, unless you really have been a dork ;-) We all start
    > >somewhere, and many of us are not too far away from where you are now. The trick is to try to
    > >remember what worked and what didn't and keep
    >
    > Hmm. I'm not finding many of them writing posts here :). <heh>. I'll have to comb through more
    > carefully.
    >
    > Gwen
    >
    >
    >

    Just most of them either don't post for fear of not comparing to the "pros", or they don't think
    they have something to contribute.

    Then there is the majority, most of us, from my impressions anyway, while having many skills, also
    are not afraid of learning something new, or a new way of doing it.

    I for one, while having a documented writing disability, find that writing ride reports, no matter
    how lame the ride was, aids me in improving my creative writing. With the right choice of words, one
    can make a slightly eventful 5 minute ride sound like an epic.

    creativity can turn "i rode over some rocks" into "as i rounded the turn, i was faced with a field
    of rocks, each one threatening to dismount me and cause great pain and blood loss, though in spite
    of the danger, i charged forward and soaked up the blow of every stone that passed under my tires
    with the grace of a wild cat".

    But then, too much creativity and it can deform the real ride into a work of fiction.

    So come on newbies, post your rides. It gives us something to read when we can't ride, and who
    knows, you may even receive some helpful pointers to use on your next ride.

    ~Travis
    --
    To reply by email, remove clothes.

    travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronic, Owner/Founder/Developer
    (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
  9. Gwen Morse

    Gwen Morse Guest

    On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 21:15:17 -0400, Technician <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I for one, while having a documented writing disability, find that writing ride reports, no matter
    >how lame the ride was, aids me in improving my creative writing. With the right choice of words,
    >one can make a slightly eventful 5 minute ride sound like an epic.

    A friend of mine recently complimented me by saying that the ride reports I've been posting in my
    blog keep her "on the edge of my seat". I'm not sure I'm writing "epic" descriptions, but, that's
    obviously still a good effort :).

    >So come on newbies, post your rides. It gives us something to read when we can't ride, and who
    >knows, you may even receive some helpful pointers to use on your next ride.

    I've sure been getting helpful pointers. It's almost as good as going out with people who "know"
    how to ride.

    Gwen

    --
    Gwen Morse -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-= "Love is a snowmobile racing
    across the tundra and then suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath. At night, the ice weasels
    come." -- Matt Groening
     
  10. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Gwen Morse wrote:
    > On 20 Apr 2003 11:13:52 GMT, [email protected] (Stephen Baker) wrote:
    >
    >> Gwen says:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb
    >>> from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    >>
    >> <more snip>
    >>
    >> Gwen, don't feel stupid at any point, unless you really have been a dork ;-) We all start
    >> somewhere, and many of us are not too far away from where you are now. The trick is to try to
    >> remember what worked and what didn't and keep
    >
    > Hmm. I'm not finding many of them writing posts here :). <heh>. I'll have to comb through more
    > carefully.
    >

    my old ones are full of newbie frustation, angst, whining and anal over analysis.

    Penny
     
  11. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    BB wrote:
    >
    >> My computer still wasn't working. I might bring my bike in tomorrow. The battery's not dead --
    >> the numbers are still there. They just don't change. I think maybe a wire is loose somewhere.
    >
    > Gotta agree with Penny on this one. The sensor on your fork can get bumped, and often does if you
    > take the front wheel off. If its too far from the magnet, it'll just stop working. I try to check
    > mine before every ride to make sure it notices the magnet passing by.

    funny note: my front whell was free spinning on the rack all the way home today. That added at
    least 2 miles to my odometer even tho it was going backwards.

    Penny
     
  12. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    JD wrote:
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Gwen Morse wrote:
    >>>> The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually*
    >>> get up it now, but, there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I
    >>> can't get "around" them on one side. Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time.
    >>
    >>
    >> suggestion: depending on the condtion of your trail... going around isn't always a good choice,
    >> contributes to cheater routes around things and widein of the trail. But it amy already be like
    >> that....
    >
    >
    > Suggestion? The rule states that if you can't ride it, walk it. Widening trails just so you don't
    > have to get off of the bike to walk something you can't ride is lazy and irresponsible.
    >
    > JD who's amy?

    amy slipped buy my spell check.

    penny
     
  13. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > JD wrote:
    > > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> Gwen Morse wrote:
    > >>>> The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually*
    > >>> get up it now, but, there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I
    > >>> can't get "around" them on one side. Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> suggestion: depending on the condtion of your trail... going around isn't always a good choice,
    > >> contributes to cheater routes around things and widein of the trail. But it amy already be like
    > >> that....
    > >
    > >
    > > Suggestion? The rule states that if you can't ride it, walk it. Widening trails just so you
    > > don't have to get off of the bike to walk something you can't ride is lazy and irresponsible.
    > >
    > > JD who's amy?
    >
    > amy slipped buy my spell check.
    >
    > penny

    I guess so did *buy...hehe
    --
    Slacker
     
  14. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    > "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> JD wrote:
    >>> "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:<[email protected]>...
    >>>> Gwen Morse wrote:
    >>>>>> The trail at Cathedral Pines starts off with a climb. I can *usually*
    >>>>> get up it now, but, there's some knotty roots right in the middle that give me trouble if I
    >>>>> can't get "around" them on one side. Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> suggestion: depending on the condtion of your trail... going around isn't always a good choice,
    >>>> contributes to cheater routes around things and widein of the trail. But it amy already be like
    >>>> that....
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Suggestion? The rule states that if you can't ride it, walk it. Widening trails just so you
    >>> don't have to get off of the bike to walk something you can't ride is lazy and irresponsible.
    >>>
    >>> JD who's amy?
    >>
    >> amy slipped buy my spell check.
    >>
    >> penny
    >
    > I guess so did *buy...hehe
    did that one on purpose neener neener
     
  15. Mr. E. Mann

    Mr. E. Mann Guest

    Gwen Morse <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    <munch>

    >
    > I took my bike to the bike shop, yesterday, to get the chain tightened. It's been falling off
    > every time I go riding, once a ride. The bike shop owner tightened it and said I need to get the
    > gear cables tightened, too, but, that I could bring it in next week. That was good because I
    > wanted to hit the trails and didn't want to wait any longer.
    >

    It would be a good idea to learn to work on your own bike. It will save you a lot of time and money,
    and it comes in real handy when you have trouble on a trail. Most of this stuff is real simple, it
    just looks hard to do. I recommend the book "Zinn and the art of mountain bike maintenence". It
    beats the hell out of the outdated looking book the guy at the LBS recomended to me.

    <munch
     
  16. Trevor S

    Trevor S Guest

    Gwen Morse <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    <Snip>

    >
    > My computer still wasn't working. I might bring my bike in tomorrow. The battery's not dead -- the
    > numbers are still there. They just don't change. I think maybe a wire is loose somewhere.

    The pickup attached to the front fork has probably moved to far from the magnet on the wheel OR the
    magnet on the wheel has fallen off :)

    Try moving the front pickup sensor so it is within say 5mm of the magnet as it spins past. If there
    is no magnet, well... that's 'ya problem :) Test it by spinning the front wheel freehand (holding
    the front of the bike off the ground, obviously)

    Trevor S
     
  17. Carla A-G

    Carla A-G Guest

    "Gwen Morse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > After not getting to ride for two weeks because the weather wasn't permitting, I've ridden three
    > times this week (Mon, Fri, Sat). I'm going to ride again on Sunday, too. Here's an update on my
    > last two rides:

    <snip>

    Keep on riding, Cathedral Pines is a nice, smooth and manicured trail. We ride there every once
    in a while.

    - CA-G

    Can-Am Girls Kick Ass!
     
  18. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    BB wrote:
    > On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 22:10:16 -0400, Gwen Morse wrote: <snip>

    >>Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb
    >>from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    >>Not only did I look like I "couldn't" climb, but, Mike was following right behind me and had to
    >>stop, too.
    >
    >
    > It always makes me feel bad to hold people up, but often it just gives them an excuse to walk
    > something that they wouldn't have made anyway!

    If I know there's a good possibility I'm going to have to bail on a climb I'll try to time
    it so that I don't cause anybody behind me any problems. Still, sometimes it happens. Part
    of the game. When the shoe's on the other foot (and it often is, since I usually ride sweep
    behind my kids) I just consider it a chance to take a break and say hi. The exception is the
    time some yahoo just *had* to pass me just before the start of a climb. Then bogged down,
    bobbled, dismounted and literally SAT DOWN in the middle of the trail less that a quarter of
    the way up. As if he didn't know there was somebody right behind him. I confined my comments
    to a heartfelt "Way to go, Ace. Nice job" as I pushed past him, then remounted and finished
    the climb. Although I must admit to slinging maybe just a little more gravel than strictly
    necessary when restarting. Making it to the top without having to stop again, and being able
    to turn around and watch him make several efforts to restart, give it up, and push his bike
    the rest of the way up was better than chocolate.

    Kathleen
     
  19. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > BB wrote:
    > >
    > >> My computer still wasn't working. I might bring my bike in tomorrow. The battery's not dead --
    > >> the numbers are still there. They just don't change. I think maybe a wire is loose somewhere.
    > >
    > > Gotta agree with Penny on this one. The sensor on your fork can get bumped, and often does if
    > > you take the front wheel off. If its too far from the magnet, it'll just stop working. I try to
    > > check mine before every ride to make sure it notices the magnet passing by.
    >
    >
    > funny note: my front whell was free spinning on the rack all the way home today. That added at
    > least 2 miles to my odometer even tho it was going backwards.
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >

    That happened to my sisters bike as my parents were taking her to college. added 53 miles to the
    odometer (giving it a total of 112 miles, she doesn't ride it all that much).

    I usually remove my speedo during transport as i have this strange paranoia that it will fall off,
    even though it has never fallen off on the much rougher trails. i did lose a tire pump on the trail
    once, though i have since fashioned a velcro retainer and it now is held secure.

    And BTW, backwards miles are counted just the same as normal miles. the spedo simply counts the
    number of times the magnet passes beneath the sensor, and applies some math to convert it to the
    correct units (ie, Mph, Kph). if the magnet goes forwards, backwards, or maybe you just jiggle the
    wheel back and forth so the magnet repeatedly passes under the sensor, either way, it is still
    passing beneath the sensor.

    ~Travis
    --
    To reply by email, remove clothes.

    travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronic, Owner/Founder/Developer
    (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
  20. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > BB wrote:
    > > On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 22:10:16 -0400, Gwen Morse wrote: <snip>
    >
    > >>Needless to say, I didn't get around them this time. However, I was able to restart my climb
    > >>from where I got stuck, rather than walking up the rest of the way. Still, I felt sort of dumb.
    > >>Not only did I look like I "couldn't" climb, but, Mike was following right behind me and had to
    > >>stop, too.
    > >
    > >
    > > It always makes me feel bad to hold people up, but often it just gives them an excuse to walk
    > > something that they wouldn't have made anyway!
    >
    > If I know there's a good possibility I'm going to have to bail on a climb I'll try to time
    > it so that I don't cause anybody behind me any problems. Still, sometimes it happens. Part
    > of the game. When the shoe's on the other foot (and it often is, since I usually ride sweep
    > behind my kids) I just consider it a chance to take a break and say hi. The exception is the
    > time some yahoo just *had* to pass me just before the start of a climb. Then bogged down,
    > bobbled, dismounted and literally SAT DOWN in the middle of the trail less that a quarter of
    > the way up. As if he didn't know there was somebody right behind him. I confined my comments
    > to a heartfelt "Way to go, Ace. Nice job" as I pushed past him, then remounted and finished
    > the climb. Although I must admit to slinging maybe just a little more gravel than strictly
    > necessary when restarting. Making it to the top without having to stop again, and being able
    > to turn around and watch him make several efforts to restart, give it up, and push his bike
    > the rest of the way up was better than chocolate.
    >
    > Kathleen
    >
    >

    Not only that, but you have the added bonus of surprise, as you have just described, for all those
    guys that think "yup, woman, i better pass her to keep from being held up". Though perhaps the guy
    was just trying to show off, and bombed.

    I admire your skill in confining your comments. I would no doubt be laughing my ass off while
    passing the guy.

    ~Travis
    --
    To reply by email, remove clothes.

    travis5765.homelinux.net, Primary Administrator TF Custom Electronic, Owner/Founder/Developer
    (current project: Automotive exhaust flame-thrower)
     
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