Updating an old bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bedbug, Apr 29, 2010.

  1. bedbug

    bedbug New Member

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    Hi all

    I'm what you might call an oldie newbie - in that I'm an old cyclist but getting back into it after a long time.

    Anyway, I'm riding a Dawes MTB at the moment and whilst I quite like it I'd love to get my old Raleigh Record Sprint up and running again. Its about 25 years old and the frame, at least is in good nick but the gears and brakes have seen better days - as have the tyres. I've got a fairly good idea about how to do the work but I'm at a complete loss as to what would be reasonable replacement gearing and braking systems. I see a lot of components on websites but where the heck do I start with suitable gear for my bike? For a start I've got downtube changers and I don't even know if they do them anymore. I don't have a huge budget and so would probably source parts from ebay ...but what?

    If anyone can point me in the right direction as to what to look for I'd be grateful.

    Thanks

    Steve
     
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  2. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    You can repair or replace nearly anything on your bike, or you can get modern wheels and STI shifters if you want. You will only have to expand the rear of the frame from 126mm to 130mm to take a wider hub in order to go modern. The payoff will be that you won't have to take your hands off the bars to shift, but the shifters alone will be over $100 for the lowest end ones. Modern wheels are slightly more aero also.

    What's wrong with the Sprint now? Have you considered simply overhauling it and keeping a classic bike on the road? You can find whatever you need although if you buy replacement parts, they may not exactly match, and you would have to buy shift levers from ebay unless I'm mistaken. However, it's unlikely there's anything seriously wrong with the old ones barring crash damage.
     
  3. lugee

    lugee New Member

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    I am in the process of doing the same thing with an old Giant 2x7 with RX100 drivetrain and old downtube shifters. I am installing Sora STI shifters (7 speed) with the downtube cable stops. Remember, when you switch to STI/brifters, you will need to replace all the cables since downtube cables are not the same as the brifter cables.

    As far as brakes, if you are riding around with an older frame using single pivot brakes that is double nutted exterior bolt (instead of the recessed bolts), then you will need to make a bracket to make newer pivot brakes to fit. I opted to stick with my old Dia compe single pivot brakes, adjust them, and replace the pads and they work fine.

    Also, if you are reusing your wheels, make sure you know whether to stay freewheel or move to freehub. I opted to stay with a freewheel and replace the freewheel component of the bike with a new 7 speed component.

    Total retrofit so far = $97 (shifters, downtube cable stops, new freewheel).
    - Shifters = $70 New
    - Cable stops = $15 New
    - Freewheel = $12 New

    The rest will be rider oriented parts like speedplay light action pedals.
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I'm a weirdo here...as I was at other forums but I digest.

    Anywho, with E-Bay you can buy just about anything your older bike had, and thus keeping the bike original and for less money and less hassles then trying to upgrade to modern STI technology. In fact trying to upgrade to more modern technology will probably cost you a small fortune that by the time your done you could have bought a brand new bike with the modern technology already installed!!

    And gearing is not usually a problem with older bikes with 126mm spacing. I have a 7 speed freewheel cluster on the Trek and all they LBS did was redish the wheel and install a washer-no spreading of the stays! Although if your bike shop had to spread the stays with steel frames it's not a problem IF the shop knows how and has done it before.

    If you have 27" rims and want to go to 700c rims the only problem then would be the brakes calipers having enough adjustment to compensate-most back then did but not all. If you can't make the adjustment sometimes just filing the slot in the caliper another cm or two does the trick, or if your wanting to buy new old stock brake system you can find long reach calipers that will eliminate reach problems. Or just stay with 27" rims since Nashbar still offers a selection of 27" tires from cheapo to fairly decent and save the cost of new rims.

    By the way, this old school stuff was more reliable...yikes I gotta run here comes the mob to stone me to death.
     
  5. LB CYCLIST

    LB CYCLIST New Member

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    nothing wrong with restoring or upgrading a older bike with todays technology. heres a pic of a bike i was riding for a lil wile,a friend of mine let me use, teledynne titan titanium frame,camponolo components,mavic wheels,continental grand prix tires.this bike can keep up with the best of em.
    [​IMG]

    i plan on doin the same with my paramount,as soon as i start getting more busy with work.:cool:
     
  6. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I understand the desire for more modern technology, but since I'm into classic cars I have a problem taking a classic car, in this case a classic bicycle, and transforming it into something that it's not...a non-classic. Bear in mind this is just my opinion. I know guys who take classic cars and transform them into modern interpretations, I just don't agree with butchering a classic like that.
     
  7. LB CYCLIST

    LB CYCLIST New Member

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    i agree that makes alot of sence, i feel the same way about the old cars, i hate seeing old ars with new nissan interior digital dashes and billet all over them.

    for a bike i guess it can be the same thing.
    right now i cant really aford to go out and buy a brand new bike, so i.m debating on getting a few thing for the bike i have now, but in the long run it might be better to save and get that new bike when the time is right.

    might cost the same.
     
  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    While I can understand why some bikes are best left in their original state, I think that most older bikes don't have a provenance which warrants EITHER time capsule preservation OR restoration to a state which represents the original showroom appearance/components of the particular bike(s) ...

    I think "vintage" steel frames are generally great riding bikes ... and, I think that they are even better when they have contemporary components.

    Consequently, I am in the camp that believes that to update one or more components on a bike (when needed or desired) should be looked at as being akin to changing the handlebar tape (or, grips for a Flat Bar bike).

    FWIW. When it comes to shifters, I recommend Campagnolo (non-QS) 10-speed shifters because they can be mated to either 8-or-9-speed Shimano "stuff" (your budget is your limitation) ... and, even 10-speed Shimano OR even 10-speed Campagnolo with the appropriate rear derailleur.

    For the most part, you can let your aesthetic sensibilities + budget be your guide to whatever updating you may decide to do.

    BTW. On the other side of the coin, some people DO prefer using their vintage components (e.g., downtube shifters) to the point where they will move the older components to a new frame!
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I kind of did that with the Mercian, except I moved the shifters from the brakes levers (which meant I had to replace the brake levers so their just levers without shifters) to the barends because this bike is going to be a touring bike and by doing that it makes the bike more stable when loaded, but that is an old school thing.

    There are also people buying old school stuff and ordering Rivendells and the like with downtube shifter bosses brazed on and putting old school stuff on the new ride. Rivendell to neame just one is fully aware of this as is E-Bay sellers.

    And why are people doing this? Mostly because the older stuff last forever with very little ever going wrong that isn't easily adjustable.
     
  10. baker3

    baker3 New Member

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    Nice bike, love the look of the old school frame with flash new wheels :D nothing rides like old steel frames IMO
     
  11. LB CYCLIST

    LB CYCLIST New Member

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  12. baker3

    baker3 New Member

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    No prob, you should cable tie some carbon bottle cages to it :D
     
  13. Akadat

    Akadat New Member

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    An old 10-speed is good in all respects except for the brakes and aluminium content.

    Alloy cranks, rims, and other bits are cheap today. Steel frames hold on for more reasons than a little weight.
     
  14. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    That's not a steel bike, it's titanium. So your right, nothing rides like old, or new by the way, steel frames not even titanium!!
     
  15. coolnice

    coolnice New Member

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    As far as brakes, if you are riding around with an older frame using single pivot brakes that is double nutted exterior bolt (instead of the recessed bolts), then you will need to make a bracket to make newer pivot brakes to fit.
     
  16. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    The Titan sure works as a modern retro-rod. How difficult was it to spread the rear stays from 120 (I presume) to 130mm?
     
  17. jstnice2

    jstnice2 New Member

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    There are also people buying old school stuff and ordering Rivendells and the like with downtube shifter bosses brazed on and putting old school stuff on the new ride. Rivendell to neame just one is fully aware of this as is E-Bay sellers.
     
  18. monishad4

    monishad4 New Member

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    Yeah I remember buying a few spare parts for my old bike from ebay. The deal was not too bad. One thing that you need to keep in mind is that always check the seller's rep before buying anything on ebay. :)
     
  19. cyclenthusias44

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    I completely agree with you. It's not steel made.
     
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