Upgrade Bike Or Components?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by William102, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. William102

    William102 New Member

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    I started cycling late 2009 after I dislocated my knee cap to rehab my knee. I purchased a Fuji Roubaix 3.0 in late 2009. It came with Shimano Sora shifters, which I found out that i dislike tremendously after riding the bike for a while. I would like opinions on whether it is better to upgrade the parts and keep the same frame or should I just upgrade to a new bike altogether. I will be doing a lot of cycling this spring/summer and doing a city to shore ride later this year.
    Thank you in advance
    William
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Big upgrades are rarely worth the money, compared to what used bikes go for. But shifters-only might make financial sense.
    It'd be easier to advise if you told us what it is about your current shifters that you don't like.
     
  3. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    What is it about the shifters that you don't like?
     
  4. William102

    William102 New Member

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    In order to shift you have to be on the hoods to do it, it has a button on the top of the hood to shift. If i am on the drops i cannot shift one way. Plus when shifting they are not really smooth and sometimes give me the wrong feedback and don't shift. I have about 200+ miles on it since I purchased it. However this year i will be doing many more so I want something that will be really reliable. So i was thinking of upgrading most of the drivetrain on the bike. I did post a picture i guess it didnt post.
     
  5. William102

    William102 New Member

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  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Sharp bike. I understand your dilemma. By your setup it looks like you've done some homework to get it to fit you. If t didn't fit, it would be easy for me to say get a new bike.

    If you do upgrade, my recommendation is this year's 10-speed Tiagra (4600) or last year's 10-speed 105 (5700). It will become harder to get parts for 9-speed, while 10-speed will be around for a while and it won't require replacing both derailleurs and the rear wheel like 11-speed would. For 10-speed, you'll need the STIs (control levers), cassette, chain, and front derailleur. You will be replacing cables, housings, and the handlebar tape, too.

    Some will recommend keeping the old front derailleur. It will work, but not well enough to justify the upgrade. Others will recommend Campagnolo levers. If you want to open that can of worms I won't try to stop you
     
  7. OGRICHBOI

    OGRICHBOI New Member

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    I suggest upgrading components over upgrading the actual bike. It is most likely cheaper and would improve your bike in the long run. However, if you do have the cash flow to upgrade the bike altogether, then feel free to do so. It is all a matter of personal preference.
     
  8. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Just occurred to me . . . Campagnolo Ergo levers have the same thumb tabs that you hate about your Tiagra STIs. We won't even think about Campy.
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Huh?

    When did the OP say that he hated the thumb levers on his SORA shifters?

    While the OP indicated that he couldn't reach them, I believe that is a matter of his probably keeping his hands static on whatever part of the Drops that he locates his hands ...

    AND, he-and-others who have trouble shifting from the Drops (regardless of the brand of shifters) only need to move his-or-her hands to reach the thumb levers or inner paddle (as may be the case).

    Really.

    It's that easily remedied!!!

    I'll address the OTHER issues (how smoothly the shifters function, or don't!?!) in another post.
     
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  10. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps when he said:

    "It came with Shimano Sora shifters, which I found out that i dislike tremendously after riding the bike for a while" followed by the bit about not being about to shift from the drops.

    Doesn't sound like he likes them...
     
  11. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    As for the smooth shifting, get some good gear cables (I prefer Shimano), cut the outer cables to the correct length, make sure that the ends are burr free and perfectly round and use the correct end caps when installing. Do not add lube to the cables.

    Shimano has a Tech section on their website that details how to adjust the indexing on the gears.
     
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  12. William102

    William102 New Member

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    Thank you for all your responses. My main concern was that the frame not being able to handle to new equipment and or worth upgrading, currently it has a 9 speed. And would upgrading the frame later down the road be easier with the new drivetrain or harder? This is my first road bike so I am new to this sport. Oh I also purchased it new in 2010 not 2009. I am also going to pick up shoes and new peddles.
     
  13. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    The frame can handle it just fine.
    "Worth upgrading" hasnt got a single set answer. Depends on how much you like it, and how difficult it'd be for you to find a replacement that's geometrically close enough.
    There's very little practical gain from going to 10 or 11-speed.
    If it was me, I'd look for another flavour of 9-speed Shimano off EBay or similar.
     
  14. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Yes ...

    I agree with you that the OP doesn't like his SORA shifters ...

    That's not to say that I wouldn't hate to ride if my bikes had Shimano SORA shifters, too ...

    But, I'll probably never have THAT experience ...

    But, that doesn't mean that he hates them .. per se ...

    BTW. Looking at a picture of how the OP's bike is set up, I reckon it may really, simply be a matter of how his shifters are located (because it is THE fashion As-Seen-On-TV + on some competitor's bikes in magazine photos) AND a lack of instruction either from his LBS or from his riding buddies.
     
  15. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    +1.

    Regardless of the brand OR model of indexed shifter, properly lubed cables & housing go a long way toward efficient gear changing ...

    If necessary, replace existing cables & housing.
     
  16. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Right here, Alf.
     
  17. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    OY!?!

    Sorry ...

    Which remark are you replying to?

    If it is the lack of smooth shifting then I reckon that the fault can possibly be due to either the shifter's internal design (!?!) or the how the LBS prepped the bike ...
     
  18. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. As dabac has suggested, "Big upgrades are rarely worth the money" ...

    But, IMO, you do not need to spend a great deal of money to achieve better shifting efficiency ...

    So, for the umpteenth time. let me say that you simply need to replace ANY pair Shimano mechanical, indexed shifters with a pair of Campagnolo shifters which have the dreaded thumb shifter.

    YOUR cost is between $100-to-$500 depending on which Campagnolo shifters you choose (lightly used or new, high-zoot Record) ...

    Unlike other "upgrades" which might involve more expensive Shimano shifters + etc. (i.e., new chain, probably a new front derailleur, etc.) or SRAM shifters (i.e., both derailleurs, chain, etc.), you would not need to replace anything else if you opted for a pair of Campagnolo shifters as the core of the upgrade because the only other thing which might come into play are the cables and/or housing.

    With Campagnolo shifters, you do NOT need to worry about the chainrings and/or their ramping-and-pinning OR lack of.

    With Campagnolo shifters, you do NOT need to worry about the front derailleur.

    Heck, with Campagnolo shifters, if the bike has a 9-speed Shimano chain, then you really don't need to worry about it other than having the correct number of links for the combination of chainrings & Cassette Cogs.

    Again, with regard to the dreaded thumb shifters, I simply move my hand from the lower portion of the Drops forward inside the bend of the handlebars so that the crook of my thumb is essentially behind the lever's clamp on the handlebar (of course, the clamp is covered by handlebar tape).

    Do THAT and you will see how easily you should be able to reach the thumb levers IF the levers are properly placed on the forward bend of the handlebars rather than the apparently fashionable location whereby the upper rear portion of the hoods are flush with the upper bend of the handlebar which are then curiously placed horizontal to the ground to create an extended platform in lieu of orienting the lower portion of the Drops in what (for me) would be usable/comfortable position.

    BTW. IMO, your bike may not be set up properly for YOU ...

    The height of the stem/handlebar relative to the saddle is VERY AGGRESSIVE for an average/typical rider ...

    Consequently, while you did not immediately indicate that you are uncomfortable with what I consider to be a your superficially smallish frame, you may find that a shorter stem or a hi-rise stem may-or-may-not result in a more comfortable riding position ...

    Based on YOUR comments + similar comments by those of others in the past, I reckon that in addition to not having the shifters well placed on the handlebars ...

    You-and-they may have an incorrect perception that you should be able to reach the thumb levers when your/their hands are located anywhere on the Drops ...

    That is, based on my experience with Campagnolo shifters, it is effortless to reach the thumb levers if the levers are properly placed on the handlebars AFTER the orientation of the handlebars is adjusted for the rider (i.e., me).
     
  19. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Smooth shifting my @ss... My bike sounds like a hit F-16 when I shift, not to mention like an Army Truck...

    ONE thing that I DO HATE on lower lever Shimano Shi(f)ters though, is them damn cables.

    I just bought a Sweet! Lezyne front light and I see Japanese Shadow Theater everynight.

    They are the Shimano 2300 levers, now replaced by Claris.

    When new, the Shifters costed 100euro for the pair. That's the same money as for a Pair of Campy Veloce and yes, they have internal cable routing and yes they are 10 speed.


    and before somebody says something about "105 11-Speed"... :D


    http://youtu.be/m6wenZ2R8IE
     
  20. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Personally I would not upgrade the bike unless it's just one item like maybe the shift levers don't work as well as you like so ok upgrade to Tiagra, but the bike isn't worth stepping up to 105. But if the whole group you don't like you would be better off buying a new bike because buying a component package by itself is very expensive vs getting it already on a bike when sold new.

    If you decide to get a new bike I would try to find a bike with 105 components, Tiagra is not a big enough jump up from Sora to make much of a difference.

    However having said all of that, if you haven't been riding the bike you now have consistently since 2009 it may be a waste of money to get a new bike so just getting Tiagra levers for your once in while rides would be the cheap way to go; if you've been riding the bike a lot and are doing say 75 or more miles a week, than a new bike may be overdue, but if you get on it once or twice a week and ride 5 or 10 miles then don't bother with new bike.
     
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