upgrades - where to start

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by LewisBricktop, Oct 15, 2007.

  1. LewisBricktop

    LewisBricktop New Member

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    I have an older bianchi san remo that i only use for indoor rides on rollers, but would like to start using outdoors as a winter bike. It is a 2001 model with the standard 2001 campy mirage triple, 9-spd gruppo. If i were to put some money into it, "some" being key, where would be the best place to start? Levers? Crankset/BB?
     
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  2. threaded

    threaded New Member

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    Best place to start is with the stuff that moves the most and then go in from there. Tires, then rims, pedals, then crank, then chain rings, then casette, I guess you get the idea.

    As it is going to be used in the winter I would suggest stainless steel or titanium replacement parts. Also have a look at what brake blocks you have, and swap them for something that works well in the wet.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FENDERS are optional, but may be a good idea if the frame has the clearance (someone does make "clip on" fenders which are designed for frames that don't have eyelets or typical fender clearance) ...

    Since it is your "winter bike" you probably want tires that are better suited to wet and/or cold weather riding ...

    You are good-to-go with most of the components on your bike ... IMO, there is no need for better wheels since it is your "winter bike" ... scuff up the braking surface of your current brake pads with some coarse sandpaper or emery cloth (~100 grit) if you aren't inclined to buying new brake pads right away.
     
  4. Eden

    Eden New Member

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    Winter riding can be tough on a bike - If I were you, I'd ride the bike as is, and replace parts as they wear out, since it will happen quicker. The first thing to go on my rain bike was my rims - we had a lot of sand on the roads last winter and they were just scoured away.

    My personal rain bike theory is don't put any parts on it that you'll cry if they are destroyed. I won a ti frame that I use, but that may be a bit over the top..... I put mostly 105 parts on it, but better brakes since it is so often raining and I did get a ceramic jockey pulley for the rear derailleur - the metal ones wear out so quickly and they squeak, it drives me nuts.
     
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