Upgrades

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Blair P. Houghton, Oct 26, 2004.

  1. See if you can spot the upgrades, courtesy of cut-rate
    prices at last weekend's gigundous sale at Tempe Bicycles:

    http://blair.houghton.net/holdsworth.jpg
    http://blair.houghton.net/holdsworth-upgraded.jpg

    (Hint: the shiny rear wheel isn't one; nor is the water
    bottle; and the slight turn in the fork exposes the yellow
    computer that's always been there; there are two visible
    upgrades and three non-visible; of the three hidden ones,
    two will be easy to guess and one is a new tube in the
    rear tire.)

    And, at the risk of exposing my exhuberance at what
    many will consider a pokey pace, here's my bike log for
    the first three months of my recovery from 12 years of
    ridelessness:

    http://blair.houghton.net/bikelog.xls

    (Don't worry; I vetted it for macro virii.)

    --Blair
    "Don't want no bugs in my grille."
     
    Tags:


  2. Cheto

    Cheto Guest

    "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > See if you can spot the upgrades, courtesy of cut-rate
    > prices at last weekend's gigundous sale at Tempe Bicycles:


    I noticed the pedals and the seat bag, which hopefully contains flat repair
    tools. :)

    Cheto
     
  3. Paul Bauer

    Paul Bauer Guest

    i see the seat pack and new pedals



    "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > See if you can spot the upgrades, courtesy of cut-rate
    > prices at last weekend's gigundous sale at Tempe Bicycles:
    >
    > http://blair.houghton.net/holdsworth.jpg
    > http://blair.houghton.net/holdsworth-upgraded.jpg
    >
    > (Hint: the shiny rear wheel isn't one; nor is the water
    > bottle; and the slight turn in the fork exposes the yellow
    > computer that's always been there; there are two visible
    > upgrades and three non-visible; of the three hidden ones,
    > two will be easy to guess and one is a new tube in the
    > rear tire.)
    >
    > And, at the risk of exposing my exhuberance at what
    > many will consider a pokey pace, here's my bike log for
    > the first three months of my recovery from 12 years of
    > ridelessness:
    >
    > http://blair.houghton.net/bikelog.xls
    >
    > (Don't worry; I vetted it for macro virii.)
    >
    > --Blair
    > "Don't want no bugs in my grille."
     
  4. Cheto <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >
    >> See if you can spot the upgrades, courtesy of cut-rate
    >> prices at last weekend's gigundous sale at Tempe Bicycles:

    >
    >I noticed the pedals and the seat bag, which hopefully contains flat repair
    >tools. :)
    >
    >Cheto


    Cheto gets all the prizes to go with his nifty casts.

    Yes, the bag contains: a set of no-glue patches which
    fit inside the interlocking plastic tire-irons, and a
    CO2 inflator with a 16-gram cartridge that should just
    explode the tire once I get it back on the rim. I saw
    some super-light tubes in the Performance catalog and I
    might get one to throw in there too, in case the flatted
    tube is unrepairable. And if I can find some lightweight
    collapsible shoes, they might fit too, in case the tire
    is shredded. So now I can cross the street and still get
    home if something happens and the mean people who post
    here won't share their patch kit.

    Oh, and one I forgot until just now: the bag also contains
    a small LED light that happens to clip onto a strap on the
    back of the bag. Now I can cross the street after dark.

    The pedals are Shimano Ultegra PD-6600's; not too highly
    rated over at roadbikereview.com, but I kind of like
    them so far, and they were like 60% off. They are very
    secure (read: damn hard to clip out of but I got bikie
    legs so that's not a real problem, thanks) and have a
    big platform. I can't really tell much difference in
    pressure distribution between these and my old pedals.
    I was able to set the cleats forward enough on my shoes
    that I wouldn't need an adapter (I prefer to ride with the
    spindle just forward of the center of the ball of my foot,
    where apparently most people like it more aft). The only
    caveat so far is that they don't just have a float, they
    can be downright loose in light pedalling situations.
    It's like having a film of ice under your foot. There are
    two small rubber pads embedded in the pedal to reduce this,
    but in some situations I don't put enough force on them
    to create friction.

    And they're shiny and have a very low profile, so the chicks
    will dig them.

    --Blair
    "My mom doesn't let me cross the
    street after dark."
    -who said it, what episode?
     
  5. Blair P. Houghton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Cheto <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>"Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>> See if you can spot the upgrades, courtesy of cut-rate
    >>> prices at last weekend's gigundous sale at Tempe Bicycles:

    >>
    >>I noticed the pedals and the seat bag, which hopefully contains flat repair
    >>tools. :)
    >>
    >>Cheto

    >
    >Cheto gets all the prizes to go with his nifty casts.


    Wait. Am I confusing Cheto and Chalo?

    Yes, I am.

    --Blair
    "I bet that doesn't happen in person either."
     
  6. Cheto

    Cheto Guest

    "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Wait. Am I confusing Cheto and Chalo?
    >
    > Yes, I am.


    No, you're, not. HUGE difference....about 200 pounds worth. :cool:

    Cheto
     
  7. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 00:42:34 +0000, Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    > a set of no-glue patches which fit inside the


    There's patches with glue now? I've always just used the kind with
    vulcanizing fluid--the patch is as strong as the tire and you don't have
    to replace the tube when you get home

    > interlocking plastic tire-irons,
    >and a CO2 inflator with a 16-gram
    > cartridge


    Mini pumps are better for getting an upper body workout. :p

    >And they're shiny and have a very low profile, so the chicks will dig
    >them.


    Most "chicks" like shiny things with a larger profile. Something in the 2
    carat range is a good start.

    :D
     
  8. Cheto <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >
    >> Wait. Am I confusing Cheto and Chalo?
    >>
    >> Yes, I am.

    >
    >No, you're, not. HUGE difference....about 200 pounds worth. :cool:
    >
    >Cheto


    Unfortunately, Usenet doesn't make a "ding" sound when you
    put in your specs. And it doesn't send your specs at any rate.

    One of you is gargantuan, and broke his wrists. The other is
    not. I'm no longer sure which.

    At any rate, I've further upgraded the bike (hopefully
    the last change until Cateye finally ships the TR100
    computer in December...or early 2008...) but it's not
    worth photographing.

    Just a new seatpost with 0 setback to give me a more
    upright leg profile. I may change it again because
    it's black and messes up the blue/silver color scheme,
    but it blends with the black seat, so not for some time,
    I don't think.

    --Blair
    "At least I remembered to put
    the seat on..."
     
  9. maxo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 00:42:34 +0000, Blair P. Houghton wrote:
    >> a set of no-glue patches which fit inside the

    >
    >There's patches with glue now?


    I didn't know there were patches without.

    >I've always just used the kind with
    >vulcanizing fluid--the patch is as strong as the tire and you don't have
    >to replace the tube when you get home


    Glue them right and you still shouldn't. Didn't keep me
    from stocking up on new tubes for half-price at the sale,
    though.

    >> interlocking plastic tire-irons,
    >>and a CO2 inflator with a 16-gram
    >> cartridge

    >
    >Mini pumps are better for getting an upper body workout. :p


    I saw one the other day that actually had a flip-out
    foot pad, and acted to pump air on both the up-stroke and
    the down-stroke.

    I'm thinking of buying a hundred gross and marketing them
    as exercise equipment for midgets...

    >>And they're shiny and have a very low profile, so the chicks will dig
    >>them.

    >
    >Most "chicks" like shiny things with a larger profile. Something in the 2
    >carat range is a good start.


    I heard the "2 months salary" thing and just about gagged.

    Any chick who wants me to drop 2 months of MY pay on a ring is
    no chick I want.

    --Blair
    "She'd need to put it across two fingers."
     
  10. Cheto

    Cheto Guest

    "Blair P. Houghton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]

    > One of you is gargantuan, and broke his wrists. The other is
    > not. I'm no longer sure which.


    My wrists are fine and last time I was called gargantuan she wasn't wearing
    her contacts and there was alcohol involved.

    Cheto
     
  11. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:26:30 +0000, Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    >>I've always just used the kind with
    >>vulcanizing fluid--the patch is as strong as the tire and you don't have
    >>to replace the tube when you get home

    >
    > Glue them right and you still shouldn't.


    I've witnessed two different bike shops around here do this: as they're
    selling somebody their first "real" bike, and they're doing the schpiel
    about maintenance and coming in for cable tightening, they talk of the
    horrors of using a patched tube and said that "for your own safety" the
    new bike owners should return to the shop and have their tube replaced for
    $15. What a load of horse shit. I'll replace the tube only if it's a
    really skinny tire and I can "feel" the patch. Never had one fail.

    I don't shop at those places anymore, at one I got chastised on the same
    visit for asking if they stocked those "mity mite" bells that are nice and
    inconspicuous on a road bike stem "what do you want a bell for?!", the
    owner sneered.

    Sorry for going OT, I really miss having a real LBS nearby. :/
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    -snip-
    maxo wrote:
    > I've witnessed two different bike shops around here do this: as they're
    > selling somebody their first "real" bike, and they're doing the schpiel
    > about maintenance and coming in for cable tightening, they talk of the
    > horrors of using a patched tube and said that "for your own safety" the
    > new bike owners should return to the shop and have their tube replaced for
    > $15. What a load of horse shit. I'll replace the tube only if it's a
    > really skinny tire and I can "feel" the patch. Never had one fail.
    >
    > I don't shop at those places anymore, at one I got chastised on the same
    > visit for asking if they stocked those "mity mite" bells that are nice and
    > inconspicuous on a road bike stem "what do you want a bell for?!", the
    > owner sneered.
    >
    > Sorry for going OT, I really miss having a real LBS nearby. :/


    $15?????????????????
    Includes scalp massage or maybe dinner?
    Fifteen Bucks???

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  13. "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > maxo wrote:


    > > they talk of the
    > > horrors of using a patched tube and said that "for your own safety" the
    > > new bike owners should return to the shop and have their tube replaced

    for
    > > $15.


    > $15?????????????????
    > Includes scalp massage or maybe dinner?
    > Fifteen Bucks???


    I want to hang out at your LBS if they throw in scalp massages with the
    replacement of a tube.

    Yeah, $15 sounds about right -- $5 for the tube, $10 for labor. You might
    think $10 is a lot for labor, but they usually drop everything else they're
    doing to replace the tube, so there's a level of hassle factor for them.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  14. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 02:26:52 -0500, A Muzi wrote:

    > $15?????????????????
    > Includes scalp massage or maybe dinner? Fifteen Bucks???


    A fair price to be sure, but any reputable shop wouldn't try to insinuate
    that a consumer can't safely change their own flat.
     
  15. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 02:26:52 -0500, A Muzi wrote:
    >>$15?????????????????
    >>Includes scalp massage or maybe dinner? Fifteen Bucks???


    maxo wrote:
    > A fair price to be sure, but any reputable shop wouldn't try to insinuate
    > that a consumer can't safely change their own flat.


    The going rate in my neighbrhood is $4+$4.
    $15 just seemed a lot

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  16. Pat

    Pat Guest

    : >>$15?????????????????
    : >>Includes scalp massage or maybe dinner? Fifteen Bucks???
    :
    : maxo wrote:
    : > A fair price to be sure, but any reputable shop wouldn't try to
    insinuate
    : > that a consumer can't safely change their own flat.
    :
    : The going rate in my neighbrhood is $4+$4.
    : $15 just seemed a lot
    : Andrew Muzi

    In this area, the charge is $10. I have been in several bicycle shops and
    have seen and heard people inquiring about the service--so far, all of them
    have been men--and they don't bat an eye when they are told it's $10 (while
    you wait, natch). I have a hard time keeping my jaw from dropping to the
    floor, but I also know several people who would never 'reuse' a tube,
    either.

    Pat in TX
     
  17. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 18:08:40 -0500, Pat wrote:

    > I also know several people who would never 'reuse' a
    > tube, either.


    Ah, they don't understand that the more Rema patches on that Taiwanese
    tube, the more panache and verve it gains.

    :D
     
  18. Claire-<< Yeah, $15 sounds about right -- $5 for the tube, $10 for labor. You
    might
    think $10 is a lot for labor, but they usually drop everything else they're
    doing to replace the tube, so there's a level of hassle factor for them.
    >><BR><BR>


    We charge $5 + $5 labor..even if you do it on the spot, it still takes the same
    amoint of time.



    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  19. maxo <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I don't shop at those places anymore, at one I got chastised on the same
    >visit for asking if they stocked those "mity mite" bells that are nice and
    >inconspicuous on a road bike stem "what do you want a bell for?!", the
    >owner sneered.


    You tell him "any advantage in a peloton."

    --Blair
    "While they're all looking back to see
    which boob is ringing a fricken' bell,
    you're slipping out and breaking away."
     
  20. maxo

    maxo Guest

    On Tue, 02 Nov 2004 03:01:25 +0000, Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    >
    > You tell him "any advantage in a peloton."


    rofl!
     
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