Upgrading Schwinn Superior??

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by thedoctuh, Jan 25, 2004.

  1. thedoctuh

    thedoctuh New Member

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    I am new to posting to this forum, but I have learned a ton from reading other posts for some time. I would love to hear some ideas about what I should do with my road bike.

    I have a 1977 Schwinn Superior. According to Sheldon Brown, this was a great year for this model. It is made in Chicago handmade shop next to the Paramount. Though it is painted with other production models. ;(

    It has the filet-brazed frame which makes it more valuable as this was Schwinns benchmark in lightweight frames. It actually is pretty darn light, and I prefer the ride to many entry level alloy bikes I've tried.

    Now, I realize this bike will never be a sub 20 pound bike, nor do I want it to be. The bike is in excellent condition, and has decent components. I would be interested to hear any input from others.

    Is it difficult to upgrade a complete groupset to this bike. For example if I bought a used Centaur groupset from Ebay, and retrofitted to index shifters and Campy front and rear mechs etc. etc.

    Will the new components fit the existing frame?

    I am having a lot of fun tinkering with the bike as it is now, but I am dissapointed in the Weinmann center-pull brakes and heavy seatpost.

    I know upgrading this bike isn't very cost-effective. But again it doesn't have to be super light. I have a rack on the back for light touring and I often ride with 15 lbs. over the rear wheel.

    I guess I'm just wondering if it is possible to upgrade drivetrain components to just have more modern features.

    Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
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  2. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Yeah, you can upgrade everything.All it takes is money. The rear drpouts will need spread to take the current 130 hubs,and possibly the derailer hanger realinged.Sheldon has a how to on the dropout spreading. If the brake calipers are nutted type, most current stuff uses a recessed bolt.
     
  3. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    Ride it, enjoy it, keep it running. If you want newer technology buy a modern bike. I'd keep it in the clasic configuration mainly because upgrading is 1) expensive, 2) not going to make a huge difference and 3) deters from the classic configuration.
     
  4. thedoctuh

    thedoctuh New Member

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    I think this may be the most rewarding way of owning the bike. I could find a decent newer model and keep the Superior as a around towner.
    I guess, I just feel kind of guilty leaving such a great frame in storage. Like it's a waste. I dunno?

    For the cost of upgrading, I could probably purchase something decent used.

    Thnaks for suggestions guys.
     
  5. amiratelmo

    amiratelmo New Member

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    I also had a 1977 Schwinn Superior. One of the dumbest things I ever did was let it go.

    It was the best loaded touring bike of its day. It took me across Europe in all sorts of weather. It hugged the road as I flew down the alps in the rain. I say it flew because the brakes were lousy. Change them and keep the rest. You're lucky to have such a bike.
     
  6. stung

    stung New Member

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    I also have what I believe is a 1977 Schwinn Superior that's been hanging in my garage for around 30 years with very little use that I would like to sell to someone who knows what it is and what it's worth.
     
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