Upper body complementary training

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by sharkantropo, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

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    Greetings.

    I ride 4 -8 miles across an avenue's sidewalk nearby three to four times a week. I own a large Takara Kabuto single speed bycicle and it really has proven its decent robustness and reliability in the road. Anyways, I feel like I'm quite content with this routine plus the usual 5 push-ups session workout I do because I don't want to neglect upper body's development.

    Now. Do you train upper body or focus you workout in leg training for cycling? It is necessary to have a balanced workout even for cycling training?.​
     


  2. Belovedad

    Belovedad New Member

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    It is vital that you train your whole body. Yes, legs are important but you need a strong core and upper body for improved stamina/breathing etc. More focus will be done on legs still but it's good to train both.
     
  3. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

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    I always thought that to improve stamina you have to do plenty aerobic workouts (cardio). Anaerobics also contributes to improve stamina but for a lesser extent.

    Which anaerobic exercices do you perform?
     
  4. Belovedad

    Belovedad New Member

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    You know cycling itself is referred to as an anaerobic exercise. I believe they can help with stamina to a good extent as you train your body to maximize its potential with the decrease of oxygen. I believe they can improve your strength, speed and power. I like to do mainly sprints and low reps-heavy mass lifting.
     
  5. pwarbi

    pwarbi Well-Known Member

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    Personally I concentrate on cardio and leg workouts but it's important to train your whole body also.

    Having a full fitness regime in place is better for cycling, even though you can target specific parts of your body to increase stamina or certain other aspects you might think need working on a bit more.
     
  6. FenWoFon

    FenWoFon Member

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    I personally train my whole body to make of cycling a better experience and something more enjoyable, however you should start doing push ups and pull ups to somehow traing your upper body, believe me, these are two of the most powerful exercices ever, you should try them out every days.
     
  7. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Actually no, cycling is an aerobic exercise. Cycling is aerobic, just like running, skating, cross-country skiing, rowing. You can go anaerobic for short efforts, but that quickly builds lactic acid which slows performance. It's why sprinters can only really sprint for 20-30 seconds, and need to rely on a leadout team to get them very close to the finish before they "pull the trigger" and go to full anaerobic power. To compete in cycling you'll need a high VO2 max, which goes with high aerobic power output (eg, FTP) relative to bodyweight.

    The ability to lift heavy weights very slowly for a few reps (ie, strength) means nothing to a cyclist because it uses the "fast-twitch" muscle fibers and the "wrong" metabolic pathways. You need to do sustained aerobic training to improve capillaries, mitochondria, heart, liver, cardio-vascular system. And you need to train your legs to move fast while pushing the pedals, because producing power requires both force and cadence.
     
  8. sharkantropo

    sharkantropo Member

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    Thats correct. Anaerobics exercises are meant to cause the formation of lactic acid in order to develop fast switch muscle fibers, and cause a
    great deal of muscle fatigue. Lower intensity exercises allow you to improve endurance and better oxygen intake but they don't develop the power required in short burst perfomances.
     
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  9. jimmy484

    jimmy484 Member

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    In truth, upper-body work is practically useless for top-end cycling performance. It might even hinder you, depending on what sort of athletic factors are important to you in your own riding career.

    However.....

    .....many of us are not solely cyclists. If you are a triathlete, a crossfitter, or a multi-sport practitioner, than yes, upper-body work is crucial. I never neglect upper-body work myself, and actually enjoy it just as a change of pace from endurance based activity.
     
  10. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Yes, agree that some upper body work is good for us as cyclists. Not to improve performance directly, but to keep us riding pain-free. Before I did core work in the gym, abs and back, was experiencing a lot of lower back pain on longer rides. Now that's all gone, and cycling is a lot more enjoyable. Also upper back and shoulder strength and flexibility seems to help prevent pain on longer rides. And for me, I believe daily stretching helps prevent problems.

    Cycling is a very specific sport, done mostly in one seated position. I think some upper body strength and flexibility conditioning can help to keep us in the game for a long time.
     
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