US Dept. of Agriculture experiences at airports ?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Hans Verschoor, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Hi,

    I am living in the Netherlands and I want to ride some trails in Utah, Colorado and California in
    September. I want to ride my own bike and I contacted the USDA to inform if there were any special
    conditions for bringing a mountain bike into the USA. They answered me that there were no official
    rules but there were no objectives if I would thoroughly clean the bike from any dirt. Just to be
    sure not to be confronted with unpleasant surpries when I am with my bike at US Customs. I want to
    ask anybody to tell what their experiences with taking a bike to the USA.

    Many thanx and enjoy your rides !
     
    Tags:


  2. I mean: objections of course .... Only reply to the group ( or use hanjen at xs4all.nl )

    "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am living in the Netherlands and I want to ride some trails in Utah, Colorado and California in
    > September. I want to ride my own bike and I contacted the USDA to inform if there were any special
    > conditions for bringing a mountain bike into the USA. They answered me that there were no official
    > rules but there were no objectives if I would thoroughly clean
    the
    > bike from any dirt. Just to be sure not to be confronted with unpleasant surpries when I am with
    > my bike at US Customs. I want to ask anybody to tell what their experiences with taking a bike to
    > the USA.
    >
    > Many thanx and enjoy your rides !
     
  3. Superslinky

    Superslinky Guest

    Hans Verschoor said...

    > Hi,
    >
    > I am living in the Netherlands and I want to ride some trails in Utah, Colorado and California in
    > September. I want to ride my own bike and I contacted the USDA to inform if there were any special
    > conditions for bringing a mountain bike into the USA. They answered me that there were no official
    > rules but there were no objectives if I would thoroughly clean the bike from any dirt. Just to be
    > sure not to be confronted with unpleasant surpries when I am with my bike at US Customs. I want to
    > ask anybody to tell what their experiences with taking a bike to the USA.
    >
    > Many thanx and enjoy your rides !

    Did you contact US customs? I would think that would be the more relevant office to contact.
    Cleaning the bike would be good, but it might actually go smoother if there are some obvious signs
    of use, scratches or whatever, to show that it is a used bike for personal use and not something
    that you plan to sell. Some documentation would be good, like an original receipt or bill of sale, a
    licence or registration from an appropriate government office. The country of origin (where it was
    made) is also of interest to customs, so if you have proof of that, whether it is a manual or a
    sticker on the bike, that might be useful as well.
     
  4. Hi "SuperSlinky",

    Thank you for reminding me of the import-and export taxes I don't want to pay of course. I will
    indeed take some documents with me and my bike is scratched enough to make sure no one would buy it,
    ha ha ! What I really am concerned about is that I might no be allowed to bring my bike into the US
    because with that I could bring in germs, seeds etc. that could pose an agricultural risk. At the
    international airports the USDA is checking incoming travellers with those cute beagle dogs sniffing
    out food in luggage. In my country was foot-and-mouth disease among cattle a while ago and now we
    have some poultry disease. I informed the USDA, and they also mentioned that. But still they said I
    could take the bike if I cleaned it thoroughly. I also asked them if US Customs had some rules for
    this, but the USDA said that the US Customs followed the USDA. But you never know once you are at an
    airport and that is why I was asking if anyone has any experiences.

    Have a nice day.

    "SuperSlinky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hans Verschoor said...
    >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > I am living in the Netherlands and I want to ride some trails in Utah, Colorado and California
    > > in September. I want to ride my own bike and I contacted the USDA to inform if there were any
    > > special conditions for bringing a mountain bike into the USA. They answered me that there were
    no
    > > official rules but there were no objectives if I would thoroughly clean
    the
    > > bike from any dirt. Just to be sure not to be confronted with unpleasant surpries when I am with
    > > my bike at US Customs. I want to ask anybody to tell what their experiences with taking a bike
    to
    > > the USA.
    > >
    > > Many thanx and enjoy your rides !
    >
    > Did you contact US customs? I would think that would be the more relevant office to contact.
    > Cleaning the bike would be good, but it might actually go smoother if there are some obvious signs
    > of use, scratches or whatever, to show that it is a used bike for personal use and not something
    > that you plan to sell. Some documentation would be good, like an original receipt or bill of sale,
    > a licence or registration from an appropriate government office. The country of origin (where it
    > was made) is also of interest to customs, so if you have proof of that, whether it is a manual or
    > a sticker on the bike, that might be useful as well.
     
  5. Marika

    Marika Guest

    "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi "SuperSlinky",
    >
    > Thank you for reminding me of the import-and export taxes I don't want to pay of course. I will
    > indeed take some documents with me and my bike is scratched enough to make sure no one would buy
    > it, ha ha ! What I really am concerned about is that I might no be allowed to bring my bike into
    > the US because with that I could bring in germs, seeds etc. that could pose an agricultural risk.
    > At the international airports the USDA is checking incoming travellers with those cute beagle dogs
    > sniffing out food in luggage. In my country was foot-and-mouth disease among cattle a while ago
    > and now we have some poultry disease. I informed the USDA, and they also mentioned that. But still
    > they said I could take the bike if I cleaned it thoroughly. I also asked them if US Customs had
    > some rules for this, but the USDA said that the US Customs followed the USDA. But you never know
    > once you are at an airport and that is why I was asking if anyone has any experiences.

    I think the dogs are checking for drugs, salami and mushrooms. Do not attempt to stash salami
    on your bike

    Unless the cows and chickens can swallow bikes, I wouldn't worry that much about it. But if your
    farm friends eat bicycles, they should get jobs as circus freaks.

    If the reasoning about cleaning the bike is logical, it follows that they would have to dip all
    humans in a preventative anti-germ smuggling solution every time they moved across any boundary.

    I have a friend who took his over with no difficulty. About the only new thing you have to worry
    about is the increasing cost of excess baggage. Excess baggage poundage and rates go up and up while
    allowable baggage poundage shrinks.

    Be especially careful on Polish planes, because their signage makes no sense. And don't get seated
    in an aisle near the WC.

    Because you will go nuts watching people trying to open the door.

    It very clearly says "pushnakitz" on the WC doors, but everyone keeps trying to pull the door open.

    The folks sitting with me kept taking bets whether people would pushnakitz or pull first, and then
    how many times they would pull before they pushnakitzed. another great varable was learning curve,
    on second time urinators. The statistics we compiled put a whole new meaning on the concept of
    standard deviation

    mk5000

    "I know the colour of my front door. That more than 99.999999999% of the population. Really, how do
    *you* prove a thing like that. %ages are often used to "prove" silly things."--DaveS
     
  6. Hi "Marika", ROTFL ! But seriously, you are right, nobody ever checked what was under the sole of my
    shoes or what was lurking in the seams of my backpack when I arrived at LAX or JFK. But one probably
    draws special attention when having other luggage than normal. (BTW: I always fly with KLM,
    NorthWest or Delta, but a nice idea to kill the time on an 11-hour flight .....). About the excess
    luggage costs: this whole trip will probably bring me to bankruptcy anyway, so who cares ? This
    friend of yours, what country did he come from ?

    "marika" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi "SuperSlinky",
    > >
    > > Thank you for reminding me of the import-and export taxes I don't want
    to
    > > pay of course. I will indeed take some documents with me and my bike is scratched enough to make
    > > sure no one would buy it, ha ha ! What I really am concerned about is that I might no be allowed
    > > to bring
    my
    > > bike into the US because with that I could bring in germs, seeds etc.
    that
    > > could pose an agricultural risk. At the international airports the USDA
    is
    > > checking incoming travellers with those cute beagle dogs sniffing out
    food
    > > in luggage. In my country was foot-and-mouth disease among cattle a
    while
    > > ago and now we have some poultry disease. I informed the USDA, and they
    also
    > > mentioned that. But still they said I could take the bike if I cleaned
    it
    > > thoroughly. I also asked them if US Customs had some rules for this, but
    the
    > > USDA said that the US Customs followed the USDA. But you never know once
    you
    > > are at an airport and that is why I was asking if anyone has any experiences.
    >
    > I think the dogs are checking for drugs, salami and mushrooms. Do not attempt to stash salami on
    > your bike
    >
    > Unless the cows and chickens can swallow bikes, I wouldn't worry that much about it. But if your
    > farm friends eat bicycles, they should get jobs as circus freaks.
    >
    > If the reasoning about cleaning the bike is logical, it follows that they would have to dip all
    > humans in a preventative anti-germ smuggling solution every time they moved across any boundary.
    >
    > I have a friend who took his over with no difficulty. About the only new thing you have to worry
    > about is the increasing cost of excess baggage. Excess baggage poundage and rates go up and up
    > while allowable baggage poundage shrinks.
    >
    > Be especially careful on Polish planes, because their signage makes no sense. And don't get seated
    > in an aisle near the WC.
    >
    > Because you will go nuts watching people trying to open the door.
    >
    > It very clearly says "pushnakitz" on the WC doors, but everyone keeps trying to pull the
    > door open.
    >
    > The folks sitting with me kept taking bets whether people would pushnakitz or pull first, and then
    > how many times they would pull before they pushnakitzed. another great varable was learning curve,
    > on second time urinators. The statistics we compiled put a whole new meaning on the concept of
    > standard deviation
    >
    > mk5000
    >
    > "I know the colour of my front door. That more than 99.999999999% of the population. Really, how
    > do *you* prove a thing like that. %ages are often used to "prove" silly things."--DaveS
     
  7. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "marika" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag > If the reasoning about cleaning the bike
    is logical, it follows that

    > they would have to dip all humans in a preventative anti-germ smuggling solution every time they
    > moved across any boundary.

    Hey I knew a guy who went to NZ for a conference. They really did give him problems about the dirt
    on his boots. That was sometome in the mid to late 90's (97?) and long enough for me to have
    forgotten how it turned out.

    -Dave
     
  8. Dave Stocker

    Dave Stocker Guest

    "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am living in the Netherlands and I want to ride some trails in Utah, Colorado and California in
    > September. I want to ride my own bike and I contacted the USDA to inform if there were any special
    > conditions for bringing a mountain bike into the USA. They answered me that there were no official
    > rules but there were no objectives if I would thoroughly clean
    the
    > bike from any dirt. Just to be sure not to be confronted with unpleasant surpries when I am with
    > my bike at US Customs. I want to ask anybody to tell what their experiences with taking a bike to
    > the USA.
    >
    > Many thanx and enjoy your rides !
    >
    As long as you give the bike a thourough cleaning before you go, it should be no problem. They
    always ask if you have been on a farm in the last X number of days, so don't tell them you ride
    across a farm on a regular basis.

    I would actually be more concerned about customs re-entering Europe. I doubt that the American
    customs will give you problems as you are a tourist and will take your bike home with you*. Bikes
    and Bike parts are considerably cheaper in the US, especially with the weak Dollar these days, so
    the Europeans will be very keen to know if the bike was bought in the US. If you still have the
    receipt from the LBS, bring it.

    *Disclaimer: there is a maximal allowed intelligence allowed for these individuals, so they can
    always surprise you with incredibly stupid assumptions: "Ah yes, you paid 4000EUR for a bike that
    goes for 3000$ un the US market. How de we know you do not want to sell it here?"

    -Dave
     
  9. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, marika5000 @my-deja.com says...
    > "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Hi "SuperSlinky",
    > >
    > > Thank you for reminding me of the import-and export taxes I don't want to pay of course. I will
    > > indeed take some documents with me and my bike is scratched enough to make sure no one would buy
    > > it, ha ha ! What I really am concerned about is that I might no be allowed to bring my bike into
    > > the US because with that I could bring in germs, seeds etc. that could pose an agricultural
    > > risk. At the international airports the USDA is checking incoming travellers with those cute
    > > beagle dogs sniffing out food in luggage. In my country was foot-and-mouth disease among cattle
    > > a while ago and now we have some poultry disease. I informed the USDA, and they also mentioned
    > > that. But still they said I could take the bike if I cleaned it thoroughly. I also asked them if
    > > US Customs had some rules for this, but the USDA said that the US Customs followed the USDA. But
    > > you never know once you are at an airport and that is why I was asking if anyone has any
    > > experiences.
    >
    > I think the dogs are checking for drugs, salami and mushrooms. Do not attempt to stash salami on
    > your bike
    >
    > Unless the cows and chickens can swallow bikes, I wouldn't worry that much about it. But if your
    > farm friends eat bicycles, they should get jobs as circus freaks.
    >
    > If the reasoning about cleaning the bike is logical, it follows that they would have to dip all
    > humans in a preventative anti-germ smuggling solution every time they moved across any boundary.
    >
    > I have a friend who took his over with no difficulty. About the only new thing you have to worry
    > about is the increasing cost of excess baggage. Excess baggage poundage and rates go up and up
    > while allowable baggage poundage shrinks.
    >
    > Be especially careful on Polish planes, because their signage makes no sense. And don't get seated
    > in an aisle near the WC.
    >
    > Because you will go nuts watching people trying to open the door.
    >
    > It very clearly says "pushnakitz" on the WC doors, but everyone keeps trying to pull the
    > door open.
    >
    > The folks sitting with me kept taking bets whether people would pushnakitz or pull first, and then
    > how many times they would pull before they pushnakitzed. another great varable was learning curve,
    > on second time urinators. The statistics we compiled put a whole new meaning on the concept of
    > standard deviation
    >
    > mk5000
    >
    > "I know the colour of my front door. That more than 99.999999999% of the population. Really, how
    > do *you* prove a thing like that. %ages are often used to "prove" silly things."--DaveS
    >

    i think it is something to do with foreign plant seeds (and other stuff) trapped in the mud.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  10. Marika

    Marika Guest

    "Hans Verschoor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi "Marika", ROTFL ! But seriously, you are right, nobody ever checked what was under the sole of
    > my shoes or what was lurking in the seams of my backpack when I arrived at LAX or JFK. But one
    > probably draws special attention when having other luggage than normal. (BTW: I always fly with
    > KLM, NorthWest or Delta, but a nice idea to kill the time on an 11-hour flight .....). About the
    > excess luggage costs: this whole trip will probably bring me to bankruptcy anyway, so who cares ?
    > This friend of yours, what country did he come from ?

    Hi "Verschoor"

    He is from the US but has brought back his bikes from Europe and S and Central Americas

    mk5000

    "Oh, dear! Sorry for the echo. My [msdros] newsposter informed me that it had not been able to post
    'because of error' - it did not explain whether this was a moral error or a technological one but
    posted in any event."--Peter HM Brooks
     
  11. Hi Travis,

    You are absolutely right, that's why the USDA advised me to clean the bike thoroughly.

    What I try to find out is how authorities at airport will be satisfied if the bike is clean and of
    course what I can do to avoid any trouble at the customs. BTW, I wonder how national bicycle teams
    deal with this, I will try to contact them ......

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > i think it is something to do with foreign plant seeds (and other stuff) trapped in the mud.
    > --
    > ~Travis
    >
    > travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
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