USA Cycling recognizes new helmet standard

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Does this mean all those Giro, Bell, Specialized etc. time trial
    helmets are USCF legal now?

    >From http://www.usacycling.org/news/user/story.php?id=2122


    """"""""""""""""""""""""""
    USA Cycling recognizes new helmet standard

    USA Cycling has recently added the European helmet standard to its list
    of approved standards for legal bicycle racing helmets. In 1986, USA
    Cycling became the first cycling federation to make hard shell helmets
    required for all bicycle races. At that time we acknowledged numerous
    government agencies, such as SNELL, ANSI, and the US CPSC. In the last
    few years, the UCI has made hard shell helmets mandatory for all races,
    and a new standard has recently appeared on the market, the European
    Committee for Standardization. Helmets approved by the European
    Committee will carry stickers (ECS or CEN) similarly to the stickers
    found in all American-made helmets.

    At all times when participating in or preparing for an event held under
    a USA Cycling permit, including club rides, all licensees who are
    mounted on a bicycle must wear a securely fastened helmet that meets
    either the US DOT helmet standards or one of the following standards:

    (1) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z90.4;
    (2) Snell Memorial Foundation Standard "B" or "N" series;
    (3) American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard F-1447;
    (4) Canadian Standards Association (CSA) standard CAN/CSA-D113.2-M;
    (5) U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) standard for bicycle
    helmets;
    (6) European Committee for Standardization (CEN) standard for bicycle
    helmets

    Riders shall show documentary proof of this, such as a manufacturer's
    label, upon request by event officials. Beginning January 1, 2010, only
    the DOT, CPSC, and CEN helmet standards will be recognized.

    """"""""""""""""""""""""""
     
    Tags:


  2. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 12 Mar 2006 06:47:53 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >Does this mean all those Giro, Bell, Specialized etc. time trial
    >helmets are USCF legal now?


    USAC is not USCF. USCF is not, AFAIK, obligated to honor the helmet
    acceptances or rejections of USAC.

    I find it interesting that they have decided to drop the ANSI and
    Snell certs from their approval list.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
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  3. Werehatrack wrote:
    > On 12 Mar 2006 06:47:53 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > >Does this mean all those Giro, Bell, Specialized etc. time trial
    > >helmets are USCF legal now?

    >
    > USAC is not USCF. USCF is not, AFAIK, obligated to honor the helmet
    > acceptances or rejections of USAC.
    >
    > I find it interesting that they have decided to drop the ANSI and
    > Snell certs from their approval list.


    USCF is part of USAC. (The other parts are NORBA, USPRO and NCCA.)
    This used to be more obvious from the usacycling.org page, but now
    it is hidden under the About USA Cycling section.

    USAC has been moving to bring their technical rules in sync
    with the UCI rules. This might be part of that. They also might
    be trying to avoid an absurd situation if some Euro team comes
    to the US to race and their lids don't have the proper sticker.

    It's possible that they are dropping the other certs by 2010
    because most of the lids sold in the US now have the
    CPSC sticker (AFAIK).

    I don't think this would legalize old TT helmets. First, they
    wouldn't have the newer certification. Second, even the Euro
    UCI races now require a TT lid that has foam in it. It's possible
    that newer TT helmets of this sort will go through the new
    European cert process and not the CPSC - in that case, they
    could become legal for racing in the US, I guess.
     
  4. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 12 Mar 2006 15:54:17 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Werehatrack wrote:
    >> On 12 Mar 2006 06:47:53 -0800, [email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >> >Does this mean all those Giro, Bell, Specialized etc. time trial
    >> >helmets are USCF legal now?

    >>
    >> USAC is not USCF. USCF is not, AFAIK, obligated to honor the helmet
    >> acceptances or rejections of USAC.
    >>
    >> I find it interesting that they have decided to drop the ANSI and
    >> Snell certs from their approval list.

    >
    >USCF is part of USAC. (The other parts are NORBA, USPRO and NCCA.)
    >This used to be more obvious from the usacycling.org page, but now
    >it is hidden under the About USA Cycling section.


    I stand corrected. Not being a member of any of the above, I missed
    the fact that USAC is the umbrella organization.

    >USAC has been moving to bring their technical rules in sync
    >with the UCI rules. This might be part of that. They also might
    >be trying to avoid an absurd situation if some Euro team comes
    >to the US to race and their lids don't have the proper sticker.


    Problems of this nature have indeed been reported. Given the overall
    lack on unanimity within the sport over the subject of which helmet
    (if any) should be mandated, and in the absence of definitive data
    identifying any single standard as being either superior or even
    demonstrably more effective at providing assurance of protection from,
    or reduction of severity of, injury, it makes sense to include as many
    standards as possible and allow the competitors to choose among them
    as they see fit.

    >It's possible that they are dropping the other certs by 2010
    >because most of the lids sold in the US now have the
    >CPSC sticker (AFAIK).


    Thus potentially negating some of the benefits of choice.

    >I don't think this would legalize old TT helmets. First, they
    >wouldn't have the newer certification. Second, even the Euro
    >UCI races now require a TT lid that has foam in it. It's possible
    >that newer TT helmets of this sort will go through the new
    >European cert process and not the CPSC - in that case, they
    >could become legal for racing in the US, I guess.


    My own expectation is that the most immediate effect will be confusion
    over what is, and what is not, legal. The issue may seem quite
    straightforward, but I have learned not to underestimate the ability
    of officials at a competitive sporting event to misunderstand and
    misapply seemingly simple changes in rules.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 02:17:10 GMT, Werehatrack
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >...Given the overall
    >lack on unanimity within the sport over the subject of which helmet
    >(if any) should be mandated,


    Should have been "which helmet *standard*, if any".
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >Beginning January 1, 2010, only
    >the DOT, CPSC, and CEN helmet standards will be recognized.


    What's the story behind this move? Why will they no longer recognize ANSI
    and SNELL?
    ------------
    Alex
     
  7. Art Harris

    Art Harris Guest

    Alex Rodriguez wrote:

    > What's the story behind this move? Why will they no longer recognize ANSI and SNELL?


    ANSI is obsolete, and Snell is seldom used. Check your helmet, it's
    most likely got CPSC certification.

    See:
    http://www.bhsi.org/standard.htm

    I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    that have neither.

    Art Harris
     
  8. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    Art Harris wrote -

    > I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    > letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    > I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    > that have neither.


    I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    curious particularly for items used by the entire species.

    When irrationality of product safety standards applies, I suspect local
    marketing forces have had their influence.

    Here (in Oz) if the commissionaires get picky they won't let you start a
    race controlled by the Cycling Federation unless it has the relevant
    Australian and New Zealand Standards sticker attached - an ANSI or Snell
    sticker will get you a d/q and no start.

    When I asked if those standards were inferior, I was told not necessarily,
    just different.

    EU countries seem to have their own certification, and the US obviously
    likewise.

    Maybe one function a new arm of the UN could usefully perform is to be the
    international body responsible to certify products to be as they should be
    or not and replace the inconsistent and locally biased systems we have at
    present - its one planet and the item either does its job or it doesn't.
    Presumably complaince costs could be reduced overall.

    I suspect this has the same prospects as porcine aviation occurring anytime
    soon.

    best. Andrew
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 13 Mar 2006 12:25:12 -0800, "Art Harris" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Alex Rodriguez wrote:
    >
    >> What's the story behind this move? Why will they no longer recognize ANSI and SNELL?

    >
    >ANSI is obsolete, and Snell is seldom used. Check your helmet, it's
    >most likely got CPSC certification.
    >
    >See:
    >http://www.bhsi.org/standard.htm
    >
    >I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    >letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    >I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    >that have neither.


    I've always figured that the organizers in such cases just copied the
    forms from a motorcycle event. I don't follow that subject anymore,
    but at one time, ANSI and Snell were the two labels that were accepted
    there.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  10. Andrew Price wrote:

    >Art Harris wrote -
    >
    >
    >
    >>I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    >>letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    >>I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    >>that have neither.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    >curious particularly for items used by the entire species.
    >
    >When irrationality of product safety standards applies, I suspect local
    >marketing forces have had their influence.
    >
    >Here (in Oz) if the commissionaires get picky they won't let you start a
    >race controlled by the Cycling Federation unless it has the relevant
    >Australian and New Zealand Standards sticker attached - an ANSI or Snell
    >sticker will get you a d/q and no start.
    >
    >When I asked if those standards were inferior, I was told not necessarily,
    >just different.
    >
    >EU countries seem to have their own certification, and the US obviously
    >likewise.
    >
    >Maybe one function a new arm of the UN could usefully perform is to be the
    >international body responsible to certify products to be as they should be
    >or not and replace the inconsistent and locally biased systems we have at
    >present - its one planet and the item either does its job or it doesn't.
    >Presumably complaince costs could be reduced overall.
    >
    >I suspect this has the same prospects as porcine aviation occurring anytime
    >soon.
    >
    >best. Andrew
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Andrew,
    There is already an organization called the International Organization
    for Standardization (the Anglicized acronym is ISO). ANSI (the American
    National Standards Institute) is a national member of ISO. I've no
    doubt that Oz has a national member organization as well.

    ISO sets standards for things like computer programming languages,
    expression of dates and times, and the like. I'm not sure why the US
    Government's Consumer Product Safety Commission and a similar
    organization in the European Union are setting helmet rules, when ISO
    would be a perfectly reasonable, world-wide choice for producing and
    maintaining a standard.
     
  11. Andrew Price wrote:
    > I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    > curious particularly for items used by the entire species.
    > ....
    > Maybe one function a new arm of the UN could usefully perform is to be the
    > international body responsible to certify products to be as they should be
    > or not and replace the inconsistent and locally biased systems we have at
    > present - its one planet and the item either does its job or it doesn't.
    > Presumably complaince costs could be reduced overall.
    >
    > I suspect this has the same prospects as porcine aviation occurring anytime
    > soon.


    The ISO already exists, which may or may not be an improvement,
    depending on how you feel about porcine aviation.

    An ancient hermitage of Tibetan monks believes that if the words
    "ISO" and "compliance costs could be reduced" are ever uttered in
    the same sentence, the stars will wink out and the end of the world
    will ... <Poof!>
     
  12. Sandy

    Sandy Guest

    Dans le message de news:[email protected],
    Colin Campbell <[email protected]> a réfléchi, et puis a déclaré :
    > Andrew Price wrote:
    >
    >> Art Harris wrote -
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    >>> letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED
    >>> HELMET." I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are
    >>> using helmets that have neither.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    >> curious particularly for items used by the entire species.
    >>
    >> When irrationality of product safety standards applies, I suspect
    >> local marketing forces have had their influence.
    >>
    >> Here (in Oz) if the commissionaires get picky they won't let you
    >> start a race controlled by the Cycling Federation unless it has the
    >> relevant Australian and New Zealand Standards sticker attached - an
    >> ANSI or Snell sticker will get you a d/q and no start.
    >>
    >> When I asked if those standards were inferior, I was told not
    >> necessarily, just different.
    >>
    >> EU countries seem to have their own certification, and the US
    >> obviously likewise.
    >>
    >> Maybe one function a new arm of the UN could usefully perform is to
    >> be the international body responsible to certify products to be as
    >> they should be or not and replace the inconsistent and locally
    >> biased systems we have at present - its one planet and the item
    >> either does its job or it doesn't. Presumably complaince costs could
    >> be reduced overall. I suspect this has the same prospects as porcine
    >> aviation occurring
    >> anytime soon.
    >>
    >> best. Andrew
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Andrew,
    > There is already an organization called the International Organization
    > for Standardization (the Anglicized acronym is ISO). ANSI (the
    > American National Standards Institute) is a national member of ISO. I've
    > no doubt that Oz has a national member organization as well.
    >
    > ISO sets standards for things like computer programming languages,
    > expression of dates and times, and the like. I'm not sure why the US
    > Government's Consumer Product Safety Commission and a similar
    > organization in the European Union are setting helmet rules, when ISO
    > would be a perfectly reasonable, world-wide choice for producing and
    > maintaining a standard.


    I think you would have no problem in sorting out a structural certifying
    process, but the background effects, and how to measure them, seem to remain
    in perpetual controversy. As does everything about helmets, of course. For
    example, filling a helmet with a specific weight, shape and material load,
    dropping it straight, angled and connected or not to a neck-like feature -
    all these are variables that are fiercely fought over by interested parties.

    But a test for the shell, independent of real-world application, is probably
    do-able.
    --
    Sandy
    Verneuil-sur-Seine
    *******

    La vie, c'est comme une bicyclette,
    il faut avancer pour ne pas perdre l'équilibre.
    -- Einstein, A.
     
  13. Donga

    Donga Guest

    Andrew:
    >Here (in Oz) if the commissionaires get picky they won't let you start a race controlled by the Cycling Federation unless it has the >relevant Australian and New Zealand Standards sticker attached - an ANSI or Snell sticker will get you a d/q and no start.
    >When I asked if those standards were inferior, I was told not necessarily, just different.


    Surely this is because Australian helmet retailers realised the number
    of riders buying their helmets for a fraction of the price over the
    internet - same helmet, but without the trade-restrictive Australian
    certification. Seems reasonable to suspect the retailers got in the
    ears of the Cycling Federation and hey, guess what? No ANZ sticker, no
    race.

    Donga
     
  14. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 14 Mar 2006 02:04:10 -0800, "Donga"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andrew:
    >>Here (in Oz) if the commissionaires get picky they won't let you start a race controlled by the Cycling Federation unless it has the >relevant Australian and New Zealand Standards sticker attached - an ANSI or Snell sticker will get you a d/q and no start.
    >>When I asked if those standards were inferior, I was told not necessarily, just different.

    >
    >Surely this is because Australian helmet retailers realised the number
    >of riders buying their helmets for a fraction of the price over the
    >internet - same helmet, but without the trade-restrictive Australian
    >certification. Seems reasonable to suspect the retailers got in the
    >ears of the Cycling Federation and hey, guess what? No ANZ sticker, no
    >race.


    What, no one is creating realistic copies of the stickers?
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  15. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On 13 Mar 2006 18:54:35 -0800, "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andrew Price wrote:
    >> I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    >> curious particularly for items used by the entire species.
    >> ....
    >> Maybe one function a new arm of the UN could usefully perform is to be the
    >> international body responsible to certify products to be as they should be
    >> or not and replace the inconsistent and locally biased systems we have at
    >> present - its one planet and the item either does its job or it doesn't.
    >> Presumably complaince costs could be reduced overall.
    >>
    >> I suspect this has the same prospects as porcine aviation occurring anytime
    >> soon.

    >
    >The ISO already exists, which may or may not be an improvement,
    >depending on how you feel about porcine aviation.
    >
    >An ancient hermitage of Tibetan monks believes that if the words
    >"ISO" and "compliance costs could be reduced" are ever uttered in
    >the same sentence, the stars will wink out and the end of the world
    >will ... <Poof!>


    I think he meant to say "if the member organizations of ISO were ever
    to be in unanimous agreement about the standards administered, and
    actually persuaded their various nations' industries and governments
    to adopt them, the universe would vanish in a quantum particle decay
    event within moments due to the locally induce rupture in the
    probability fields."
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  16. Mark Janeba

    Mark Janeba Guest

    Andrew Price wrote:
    > Art Harris wrote -
    >
    >
    >>I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    >>letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    >>I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    >>that have neither.

    >
    >
    > I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    > curious particularly for items used by the entire species.


    Do you mean like drug purity standards, or drug safety standards, or
    automobile emission standards (which even vary by state in the US)?

    This sort of thing (local standards) happens all the time. Indeed, it
    rarely fails to happen that standards vary by locality. Good or bad,
    it's the reality we live in.

    Mark
     
  17. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > On 14 Mar 2006 02:04:10 -0800, "Donga"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:

    -snip-
    >> No ANZ sticker, norace.


    Werehatrack wrote:
    > What, no one is creating realistic copies of the stickers?


    When that rule was first applied in USCF our helmet reps
    passed out rolls of stickers. But a sticker won't help an
    obviously non-compliant helmet.

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  18. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:52:38 -0800, Mark Janeba
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andrew Price wrote:
    >> Art Harris wrote -
    >>
    >>
    >>>I'm always amused to see bike event applications that state in big
    >>>letters, "ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST WEAR AN ANSI OR SNELL APPROVED HELMET."
    >>>I'll bet 95 percent of the riders in those events are using helmets
    >>>that have neither.

    >>
    >>
    >> I find the notion of national, as opposed to international, standards
    >> curious particularly for items used by the entire species.

    >
    >Do you mean like drug purity standards, or drug safety standards, or
    >automobile emission standards (which even vary by state in the US)?
    >
    >This sort of thing (local standards) happens all the time. Indeed, it
    >rarely fails to happen that standards vary by locality. Good or bad,
    >it's the reality we live in.


    Why shouldn't different people adopt rules and standards that reflect their own
    perception of risk or local costs.

    Why would standards be universal?

    Ron
     
  19. On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 15:30:04 GMT, RonSonic <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Why shouldn't different people adopt rules and standards that reflect their own
    >perception of risk or local costs.


    In some cases just to save energy. There is probably more diversity
    of opinion on helmets and cycling within either the US or, say,
    Australia, than the differences between "typical" opinions in either
    place.

    JT

    ****************************
    Remove "remove" to reply
    Visit http://www.jt10000.com
    ****************************
     
  20. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:36:45 -0600, A Muzi <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >> On 14 Mar 2006 02:04:10 -0800, "Donga"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >-snip-
    >>> No ANZ sticker, norace.

    >
    >Werehatrack wrote:
    >> What, no one is creating realistic copies of the stickers?

    >
    >When that rule was first applied in USCF our helmet reps
    >passed out rolls of stickers. But a sticker won't help an
    >obviously non-compliant helmet.


    Heh. Yeah, we used to see fools show up with a military surplus
    combat helmet that they'd retrofitted with a sticker that I suspect
    they peeled from a new unit in a shop somewhere. They didn't pass
    tech. One of them even tried to come back through with a different,
    older actual bike helmet that he'd restuck the same sticker into that
    he'd had on the steel one. He forgot to peel the *older, original*
    sticker that was just under the edge of the padding first, though, and
    it showed the unit as non-compliant. That got him a warning that any
    further tech infractions would net him an escort to the gate. Today,
    I think the second dumbass move would probably be enough. For one
    thing, in motorized racing around here, the tech inspectors tend to be
    the guys who were the most adept at beating the system years ago.
    They do not look kindly on hamfisted stupidity; their standards are
    higher.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
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