USE Alien adjustments

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Chris M, Feb 16, 2006.

  1. Chris M

    Chris M Guest

    I was remembering hearing someone say that this seatpost is easy to
    adjust where I (and many others) have a lot of trouble. I was wondering
    if greasing the track that the center piece slides along would help?
    The thing is supposed to slide effortlessly until the torque from the
    screws holds it in place. What happens on mine is that the torque on
    the screws pushes the seat rail holders to move from where I adjusted
    it but I can no longer influence it. I have to guess how far it will
    move and then adjust it.

    Has anyone tried grease or any other tricks to share? I am close to
    giving this thing away and it was not cheap. :>(
     
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  2. Kinky Cowboy

    Kinky Cowboy Guest

    On 16 Feb 2006 13:35:43 -0800, "Chris M" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was remembering hearing someone say that this seatpost is easy to
    >adjust where I (and many others) have a lot of trouble. I was wondering
    >if greasing the track that the center piece slides along would help?
    >The thing is supposed to slide effortlessly until the torque from the
    >screws holds it in place. What happens on mine is that the torque on
    >the screws pushes the seat rail holders to move from where I adjusted
    >it but I can no longer influence it. I have to guess how far it will
    >move and then adjust it.
    >
    >Has anyone tried grease or any other tricks to share? I am close to
    >giving this thing away and it was not cheap. :>(


    Apparently the Cyclops clamp
    http://www.use1.com/products/spares_repairs/cyclops_clamp.php is a big
    improvement (I haven't tried it, but the USE sales guy was
    enthusiastic about it when launched), so if you don't already have
    that get your dealer to supply one - it can be retrofitted to any
    Alien post.

    If that doesn't solve your problem (or you already have the Cyclops)
    DON'T grease the track, those things can slip if you land on the nose
    or tail of the saddle anyway, and grease is bound to make matters
    worse.

    When you've given up hope, get a Thomson, they're as light as a USE
    and much easier and more secure in their adjustment.

    Kinky Cowboy*

    *Batteries not included
    May contain traces of nuts
    Your milage may vary
     
  3. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Kinky Cowboy wrote:

    >
    > Apparently the Cyclops clamp
    > http://www.use1.com/products/spares_repairs/cyclops_clamp.php is a big
    > improvement (I haven't tried it, but the USE sales guy was
    > enthusiastic about it when launched), so if you don't already have
    > that get your dealer to supply one - it can be retrofitted to any
    > Alien post.
    >

    Seems the dealers are all in the UK. To answer the OP, I have one and
    don't find it tough to get tight and hold. I use a 2.5 mm T handle allen
    wrench which is about 20 cm long. I can't see possibly doing this w/o a
    lot of grief if using an L shaped allen wrench.

    Mine has held just fine, but the fellow I bought it from sold it cheaply
    as he kept having it come loose & he was disgusted. I figured to use a
    thread locker if I had to, but so far so good.

    BTW, I think the design poor even if mine does hold. I don't recommend
    this post.

    -paul
     
  4. Chris M

    Chris M Guest

    I have a Thomson too, and it is not as light but close enough (about 30
    grams difference even after I trimmed both of them). I have 2 AC
    seat-posts and the USE and Thomson are the non-setback posts I use. I
    rarely have both non-setback posts installed so I use the Thomson or an
    AC, or both Amclassics. I did not know that the update was available as
    a retrofit. I thought it was a new clamp with a single bolt in the
    center to replace the 2 smaller on the side of the first version (that
    I have).

    To the second reply from Paul, I was saying that I can get it to hold,
    but it shifts (changes angle) as I tighten. I think that the difference
    must be the saddle rails. My saddles have "Manganese" rails and they
    are kind of rough and while that helps them grip any seatpost, I think
    they might grab early and that is what causes them to get pushed in to
    a different angle by the time I get enough torque on them to hold it
    solid. Tomorrow I am installing a new saddle (an SKN Selle San Marco
    with titanium rails that I hope are smoother) and if it doesn't clamp
    down at the angle I like I will swap it for the Thomson.
     
  5. Chris M

    Chris M Guest

    I have a Thomson too, and it is not as light but close enough (about 30
    grams difference even after I trimmed both of them). I have 2 AC
    seat-posts and the USE and Thomson are the non-setback posts I use. I
    rarely have both non-setback posts installed so I use the Thomson or an
    AC, or both Amclassics. I did not know that the update was available as
    a retrofit. I thought it was a new clamp with a single bolt in the
    center to replace the 2 smaller on the side of the first version (that
    I have).

    To the second reply from Paul, I was saying that I can get it to hold,
    but it shifts (changes angle) as I tighten. I think that the difference
    must be the saddle rails. My saddles have "Manganese" rails and they
    are kind of rough and while that helps them grip any seatpost, I think
    they might grab early and that is what causes them to get pushed in to
    a different angle by the time I get enough torque on them to hold it
    solid. Tomorrow I am installing a new saddle (an SKN Selle San Marco
    with titanium rails that I hope are smoother) and if it doesn't clamp
    down at the angle I like I will swap it for the Thomson.
     
  6. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Chris M wrote:

    >
    > To the second reply from Paul, I was saying that I can get it to hold,
    > but it shifts (changes angle) as I tighten. I think that the difference
    > must be the saddle rails. My saddles have "Manganese" rails and they
    > are kind of rough and while that helps them grip any seatpost, I think
    > they might grab early and that is what causes them to get pushed in to
    > a different angle by the time I get enough torque on them to hold it
    > solid. Tomorrow I am installing a new saddle (an SKN Selle San Marco
    > with titanium rails that I hope are smoother) and if it doesn't clamp
    > down at the angle I like I will swap it for the Thomson.
    >


    My saddle with Ti rails doesn't do this but I don't like the fore - aft
    adjustment being tied to tilt one. I think that a bad design. Now that I
    have my saddle where I want it fore and aft, it's pointed a bit too down
    for my fit. My previous Thomson was fully adjustable. I sold it because
    it had a lot of setback where I needed none. Aside from that, I would
    have used it forever as I liked it a lot.

    I'm of a mind now to just ride for a while and let the buying / fitting
    / worrying about stuff go as I bought the bike last August (my first
    road bike) and needed to swap the seat post, then the stem and bars (new
    stem needed new bars). I'm sort of weary of spending money on my new hobby.

    I do need new shoes, but that'll be it for me. If I get on a spending
    tear again, the first thing will be the seat post. I'll merrily gain 30
    g to also gain full adjustability.

    -paul
     
  7. Chris M

    Chris M Guest

    My Thomson in a non-setback model. I actually took both Am-classic
    seatpins off and put the USE on my OCLV and the Thomson on the TT bike.
    The TT bike some times needs the longer reach of the AC post but the
    OCLV doesn't matter. I need to shove the seat back on the TT bike quite
    often but I also have a longer stem for it. I have the USE with an old
    Max Flite saddle and I will see how it goes. I think I know which
    Thomson you had, the one with the slight bend? I had one of those too
    and it was not long enough.

    What shoes are you looking at? I am almost always looking at shoes
    because I think they have the biggest payoff in terms of need to get it
    right and the payoff on comfort and performance. The shoes are the only
    thing a roadie has that are more important than wheels. I tried a whole
    bunch of great shoes and every time I go to look, the market gets
    better and better. I love the DMTs, for the heel cup design and I also
    love the North-wave Aerators and Aerator 3s. They fit amazing for me
    and they are so rigid (which I love). The Specialized line has to be
    the best value though not quite as nice as the first 2 I mentioned.
    Have fun and thanks for your help.
     
  8. Paul Cassel

    Paul Cassel Guest

    Chris M wrote:
    > My Thomson in a non-setback model. I actually took both Am-classic
    > seatpins off and put the USE on my OCLV and the Thomson on the TT bike.
    > The TT bike some times needs the longer reach of the AC post but the
    > OCLV doesn't matter. I need to shove the seat back on the TT bike quite
    > often but I also have a longer stem for it. I have the USE with an old
    > Max Flite saddle and I will see how it goes. I think I know which
    > Thomson you had, the one with the slight bend? I had one of those too
    > and it was not long enough.


    I got the idea that a carbon seat post would make my Al bike ride
    smoother. This is the chief reason I was looking for a carbon post when
    I found my Thomson w/setback wasn't right for me. I ended up with the
    USE Alien because I bid low on one after another carbon over at ebay and
    finally got this one for a very low cost. For some reason, others failed
    to bid on it. I'm not very selective on what I try / buy as I'm a
    newbie. I figure I need to try out various things of different natures
    finding what suits me. Anything that doesn't work for me gets sold at
    the Swap, privately or on eBay - thus the tryouts aren't too abusive on
    the wallet.

    I don't think the carbon seat post gives a smoother ride than the Al
    Thomson.
    >
    > What shoes are you looking at? I am almost always looking at shoes
    > because I think they have the biggest payoff in terms of need to get it
    > right and the payoff on comfort and performance. The shoes are the only
    > thing a roadie has that are more important than wheels. I tried a whole
    > bunch of great shoes and every time I go to look, the market gets
    > better and better. I love the DMTs, for the heel cup design and I also
    > love the North-wave Aerators and Aerator 3s. They fit amazing for me
    > and they are so rigid (which I love). The Specialized line has to be
    > the best value though not quite as nice as the first 2 I mentioned.
    > Have fun and thanks for your help.
    >


    Due to my wide forefoot, I've decided to try the Sidi Dominator 5 Mega
    Lorica based on feedback I got here. Like other things, I like to start
    with experts' recommendations and then try for myself rather than a
    complete zero budget. This is like the carbon seat post. Others said
    that carbon is shock absorbing material. I find that true in my front
    end where my forks and bars are plastic giving me a very smooth ride
    (easy on hands) but that didn't translate to the seat post.

    I plan on keeping my SPD mtn bike style shoes / pedals because I don't
    want to lose my easy walking ability.
     
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