used, mid-level cyclocross recommendations

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rick, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Rick

    Rick Guest

    i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    ago)
    and looking to get back into cyclocross.

    i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    $800-$1200 to start.

    some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any strengths
    and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be very
    valuable.
    for me and the group.
     
    Tags:


  2. bfd

    bfd Guest

    Have you considered "used"? You don't say where you live, but there are
    some good deals on craigslist and ebay. I saw a 57cm Rock Lobster cross
    complete with DA 8 for $650. Another good site is roadbikereview.com
    classified.

    Of course, if ya gotta have *new*, then any of the ones mentioned are
    good buys!
     
  3. Neil Brooks

    Neil Brooks Guest

    "bfd" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have you considered "used"? You don't say where you live, but there are
    >some good deals on craigslist and ebay. I saw a 57cm Rock Lobster cross
    >complete with DA 8 for $650. Another good site is roadbikereview.com
    >classified.
    >
    >Of course, if ya gotta have *new*, then any of the ones mentioned are
    >good buys!


    Look at the OP's subject line again....

    "used, mid-level cyclocross recommendations"
    --
    Live simply so that others may simply live
     
  4. Rick wrote:
    > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long ago)
    > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    >
    > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > $800-$1200 to start.
    >
    > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any strengths
    > and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be very
    > valuable.
    > for me and the group.


    Most cyclocross bikes in that price range are pretty decent.
    If you have some spare parts lying around, you can also
    try building up a frame from one of a number of smaller
    builders (e.g. Gunnar, Kelly, Rock Lobster).
    The thing you should look for before anything else is fit.
    There are a couple of issues here, one is that most people
    prefer a slightly more upright position on a cross bike. That
    means ability to get the bars higher, and maybe a shorter
    top tube (by a cm or two) than you would ride on a road bike.

    The second issue is that the geometry of different makes'
    cross bikes varies a bit more than road bikes. Be careful
    when making comparisons becauses "size" can mean
    different things (center-center, center-top, center-top of sloping
    top tube, etc). Also some cross bikes have a higher than
    normal bottom bracket (a holdover from days of pedaling
    on the back of toeclip pedals). This increases standover
    for a given seat tube size. Ordinarily standover is not very
    important, but on a cross bike you have a greater than usual
    chance of dismounting clumsily.

    As an example, I remember concluding that I wouldn't fit easily
    on a Cannondale, because the size that got the head tube high
    enough had too long a top tube and too high standover.
    Other people would fit differently.
     
  5. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Rick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    > ago)
    > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    >
    > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > $800-$1200 to start.
    >
    > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross.


    Look for Jamis Novas, also.

    I'm currently building up a Soma Double Cross with a variety of parts from
    Ebay including some Shimano105 for a total of $1150 plus whichever parts
    required sales tax. I already had a rear derailer, seatpost, saddle, and
    pedals to use.

    Greg
     
  6. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "G.T." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Rick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    > > ago)
    > > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    > >
    > > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > > $800-$1200 to start.
    > >
    > > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross.

    >
    > Look for Jamis Novas, also.
    >
    > I'm currently building up a Soma Double Cross with a variety of parts from
    > Ebay including some Shimano105 for a total of $1150 plus whichever parts
    > required sales tax. I already had a rear derailer, seatpost, saddle, and
    > pedals to use.
    >


    Oh, yeah, for an already built bike the Kona Jake the Snakes are hard to
    beat. Actually, the only reason I didn't go with a new Jake the Snake is
    that it's currently a pretty obnoxious color.

    Greg
     
  7. Nate Knutson

    Nate Knutson Guest

    Rick wrote:
    > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    > ago)
    > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    >
    > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > $800-$1200 to start.
    >
    > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any strengths
    > and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be very
    > valuable.
    > for me and the group.


    I was also going to suggest the Jamis Nova, which is now a bit over the
    top of your price range anyway, until I looked at the new 2006 specs
    and saw that it has some strikes against it over last year's. Last year
    it was really cool because it came with a Tiagra/MA-3/butted spoke
    wheelset as opposed to the overpriced jank ones that most bikes in this
    category have.
     
  8. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Rick wrote:
    > > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind

    of long ago)
    > > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    > >
    > > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to

    spend about
    > > $800-$1200 to start.
    > >
    > > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were

    redline
    > > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any

    strengths
    > > and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be

    very
    > > valuable.
    > > for me and the group.

    >
    > Most cyclocross bikes in that price range are pretty decent.
    > If you have some spare parts lying around, you can also
    > try building up a frame from one of a number of smaller
    > builders (e.g. Gunnar, Kelly, Rock Lobster).
    > The thing you should look for before anything else is fit.
    > There are a couple of issues here, one is that most people
    > prefer a slightly more upright position on a cross bike. That
    > means ability to get the bars higher, and maybe a shorter
    > top tube (by a cm or two) than you would ride on a road bike.
    >
    > The second issue is that the geometry of different makes'
    > cross bikes varies a bit more than road bikes. Be careful
    > when making comparisons becauses "size" can mean
    > different things (center-center, center-top, center-top of

    sloping
    > top tube, etc). Also some cross bikes have a higher than
    > normal bottom bracket (a holdover from days of pedaling
    > on the back of toeclip pedals). This increases standover
    > for a given seat tube size. Ordinarily standover is not very
    > important, but on a cross bike you have a greater than usual
    > chance of dismounting clumsily.
    >
    > As an example, I remember concluding that I wouldn't fit easily
    > on a Cannondale, because the size that got the head tube high
    > enough had too long a top tube and too high standover.
    > Other people would fit differently.


    This is very true of the Cannondale, which I just bought. I
    bought it based on price and on-bike fit, but the stand-over
    height is suprisingly high. I would run the saddle a little
    lower from cross racing and think it will be just fine. I like
    the relatively long top-tube. I bought it primairly for
    commuting.

    I am old and slow, but every year someone tries to get me back
    into racing, and I end up on these early season training rides in
    the rain. I was out this weekend on the Cannondale and was
    rather amazed at how limber the front end was in a sprint,
    especially in light of the humungus forks. When I got the bike
    home, I noticed that the front wheel was way out of true (it is a
    disc, so the rim does not rub the pads). I measured the tension,
    and it was about 50kgf. Way low, and nearly slack on some
    spokes. I tensioned it and trued it, so, now I have to try
    sprinting again on the way home from work tonight and see how
    solid it really is. The rear end stays put because of the long
    stays.

    Other equipment nits to pick about the Cannondale: the Shimano
    chain just did not want to work with the 9 speed SRAM cassette.
    Lots of skipping like a malignant stiff link. I put on a SRAM
    chain, and it works fine. The disc hubs look cheap and have a lot
    of seal drag. It has real cross chain rings which basically
    gives you a microdrive -- not much of a big gear for the road.
    The Avid road discs are great but they do have a break-in period.
    There are some very nice parts at this price point -- an Cinelli,
    FSA, Fisik, Ultegra. The wheels are very straight-forward Open
    Pros 14/15 3X, which I like. Unlike the Empella and some other
    high-end frames, the Cannondale does have eyelets for fenders, so
    it can be used for something other than pure racing. -- Jay
    Beattie.
     
  9. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Nate Knutson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Rick wrote:
    > > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    > > ago)
    > > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    > >
    > > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > > $800-$1200 to start.
    > >
    > > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any strengths
    > > and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be very
    > > valuable.
    > > for me and the group.

    >
    > I was also going to suggest the Jamis Nova, which is now a bit over the
    > top of your price range anyway, until I looked at the new 2006 specs
    > and saw that it has some strikes against it over last year's. Last year
    > it was really cool because it came with a Tiagra/MA-3/butted spoke
    > wheelset as opposed to the overpriced jank ones that most bikes in this
    > category have.
    >


    Yeah, I really tried hard to find a last year's 60cm the last 2 months. No
    luck. And the new spec didn't interest me.

    Greg
     
  10. Kinky Cowboy

    Kinky Cowboy Guest

    On Tue, 3 Jan 2006 15:03:00 -0800, "G.T." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Oh, yeah, for an already built bike the Kona Jake the Snakes are hard to
    >beat. Actually, the only reason I didn't go with a new Jake the Snake is
    >that it's currently a pretty obnoxious color.
    >


    Which colour don't you like? I would have had the 2005 (blue+black)
    for choice, but I bought a 2004 (disturbing metallic green) at a big
    discount and learned to live with the colour. The 2006 (orange+black)
    is worse than either. The 2005s also have auxiliary brake levers,
    which weren't on my 2004 and seem to have been dropped for the 2006.

    Overall a strong recommend for a NOS 2005 JtS if you find one with a
    discount in your size and like the colour; my 2004 is the nicest "do
    anything" bike I've ever owned. My little brother loves his Orbea
    Terra CX/Veloce, which should also be within your price range used.
    Kinky Cowboy*

    *Batteries not included
    May contain traces of nuts
    Your milage may vary
     
  11. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    "Kinky Cowboy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 3 Jan 2006 15:03:00 -0800, "G.T." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Oh, yeah, for an already built bike the Kona Jake the Snakes are hard to
    > >beat. Actually, the only reason I didn't go with a new Jake the Snake is
    > >that it's currently a pretty obnoxious color.
    > >

    >
    > Which colour don't you like? I would have had the 2005 (blue+black)
    > for choice, but I bought a 2004 (disturbing metallic green) at a big
    > discount and learned to live with the colour. The 2006 (orange+black)
    > is worse than either.


    That's the one I'm talking about. I couldn't find a 60cm 2005. I believe
    the 2006 still has auxiliary brake levers.

    Greg
     
  12. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Rick wrote:

    > i'm a former road racer (LONG time ago) and mtb racer (kind of long
    > ago)
    > and looking to get back into cyclocross.
    >
    > i'll ride probably 40-60 miles a week. and i was hoping to spend about
    > $800-$1200 to start.
    >
    > some recommendations that poppped up from a review site were redline
    > conquest, bianchi axis, and cannondale cyclocross. any strengths
    > and weaknesses anyone could share from experience would be very
    > valuable.
    > for me and the group.
    >

    Or the Redline Conquest

    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
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