Uses for fresh Mozarella

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Daisy, Feb 16, 2004.

  1. Daisy

    Daisy Guest

    I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    better use for this product.

    I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    size of a small golf ball) in liquid.

    Thanx out there.

    Daisy.

    Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.
     
    Tags:


  2. Loki

    Loki Guest

    il Wed, 11 Feb 2004 20:50:21 +1300, Daisy ha scritto:

    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    > better use for this product.
    >
    > I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    > size of a small golf ball) in liquid.
    >
    > Thanx out there.
    >
    >
    > Daisy.

    Slice and add to sliced tomatoes and drizzle with olive oil and maybe a few basil leaves. Scoff
    at leisure.

    --
    Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]
     
  3. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Daisy wrote:

    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?).

    Bocconcini

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot) com
     
  4. Nancree

    Nancree Guest

    Here's what I do with fresh Mozarella. I use the bigger kind, about half the
    size of a fist, that comes sealed in a plastic bag with liquid, found in your
    deli counter. If you have the little balls of Moz. you could cut in half, and
    do this:

    Take slices of baguette. Then, in this order:
    * slice of tomato
    * slice of mozarella
    * fresh basil leaves. *Parmesan shavings Toast until cheese melts. Then die and go to heaven.

    Nancree
     
  5. Mia

    Mia Guest

    "Daisy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    > better use for this product.
    >
    > I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    > size of a small golf ball) in liquid.
    >
    > Thanx out there.
    >
    >
    > Daisy.
    >
    > Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

    I like to roll the small mozzarellas in chopped fresh herbs or red and black pepper, etc ... or you
    can use any spices that you like. I also use them for a marinated mozzarella salad from Jamie Oliver
    where you smear a bit of creme fraiche on the mozz, then sprinkle with lemon zest, squeeze half a
    lemon over then, sprinkle with salt and fresh pepper, toss some finely sliced red chiles over it,
    and then drizzle with very good olive oil.

    Mia
     
  6. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    "Daisy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    > better use for this product.
    >
    > I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    > size of a small golf ball) in liquid.
    >
    > Thanx out there.
    >
    >
    > Daisy.
    >
    > Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.

    Sometimes marinated in oil and garlic.

    Best served plain with a toothpick.
     
  7. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Daisy wrote:

    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    > better use for this product.
    >
    > I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    > size of a small golf ball) in liquid.
    >
    > Thanx out there.
    >

    It's nice with tomatoes, basil and balsamic vinegar.
     
  8. stan

    stan Guest

    Daisy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    > - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be a
    > better use for this product.

    > I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    > size of a small golf ball) in liquid.

    > Thanx out there.

    Take a thin slice of toasted Italian or French bread, top it with a thin slice of a Roma (or plum)
    tomato, a thin slice of the cheeze and a fresh basil leaf. Delicious.
     
  9. On 11 Feb 2004 23:07:23 +1300, Loki wrote:

    > il Wed, 11 Feb 2004 20:50:21 +1300, Daisy ha scritto:
    >
    >> I have now located the latest rave thing here - fresh Mozarella cheese
    >> - called Boccarini (sp?). I am finding it just a tad bland sliced on salads, but there has to be
    >> a better use for this product.
    >>
    >> I would simply love to have some recommendations for this cheese. It is in small balls (about the
    >> size of a small golf ball) in liquid.
    >>
    >> Thanx out there.
    >>
    >> Daisy.
    >
    > Slice and add to sliced tomatoes and drizzle with olive oil and maybe a few basil leaves. Scoff at
    > leisure.

    ...don't forget the balsamic vinegar!

    --
    Tim.

    If the human brain were simple enough that we could understand it, we would be so simple that
    we couldn't.
     
  10. fresh spinach leaves, fresh mozarella, red onion rings, olive ioil, balsamic vinegar, walnuts(just a
    few)....it doesn;t get better than that.....

    also can be used on home-made pizza, but watch the juice, make sure that the tomatoe sauce is very
    thick and pasty cause the mozarella has a high liquuid content..

    hth, LG
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, "Loki"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Slice and add to sliced tomatoes and drizzle with olive oil and maybe a few basil leaves. Scoff at
    > leisure.

    Loki, well-spent leisure ought not be scoffed at.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  12. Jiminy

    Jiminy Guest

    On 11 Feb 2004 10:40:14 GMT, [email protected] (Nancree) wrote:

    >Take slices of baguette. Then, in this order:
    >* slice of tomato
    >* slice of mozarella
    >* fresh basil leaves. *Parmesan shavings Toast until cheese melts. Then die and go to heaven.

    the above, served in a dish (no bread and NO parmesan, bleah!), it's called "Caprese" (mozzarella à
    la Capri)...

    best,

    Jiminy
     
  13. Daisy

    Daisy Guest

    OK - and now thanx everyone for the input.

    I presented the boccancini tonight in the recommended fashion - and NONE of my guests liked it. The
    general opinion was "too bland", "lacked any flavour" and even "boring". Someone described it as
    tasting just like tofu! I was mortified!

    I sliced it very thinly and marinated it for about half an hour in balsamic vinegar and (very good)
    extra virgin olive oil, seasoned with salt and freshly ground black pepper. I then put a thin slice
    of roma tomato on a crostini, then the cheese, and topped with a shredded basil leaf.

    I have to say at this point that I am in New Zealand and it is late summer here; I have basil
    growing and the tomato season is in full swing. We also have sun-ripened vine-tomatoes here (at a
    price) and this was what I used.

    This product may well be good on a pizza - although I am advised it can spread wildly due to its
    liquid consistency.

    I can only say I tried; no one liked it and I won't be buying it again.

    PS - since I am a gorgonzolla and Danish blue cheese fan, perhaps boccancini would be too mild for
    me - whadya think? (I didn't ask my guests what sort of cheese they usually like, but I know that
    one or two reglarly clean up the stronger blue cheeses on the cheeseboard when we get to the port
    and liqueurs stage after dinner. Perhaps that tells us something!) ....


    Daisy.

    Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.
     
  14. Just my opinion, but fresh mozzarella, while not sharply flavored...should not be bland...if it is
    made with milk or cream and kept in milk,and made correctly, it will be smooth.it will taste more
    like a heavenly ricotta than anything else...compared to the sharper cheeses ricotta is pretty bland
    but it's taste is wonderful for those who like it and in some dishes it can;t be beat.....\ LG
     
  15. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Daisy wrote:
    >
    > OK - and now thanx everyone for the input.
    >
    > I presented the boccancini tonight in the recommended fashion - and NONE of my guests liked it.
    > The general opinion was "too bland", "lacked any flavour" and even "boring". Someone described it
    > as tasting just like tofu! I was mortified!

    How very rude! Their loss if they didn't care for it, but why mortify the person who
    brought it. Geez.

    nancy
     
  16. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Daisy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > OK - and now thanx everyone for the input.

    > I presented the boccancini tonight in the recommended fashion - and NONE of my guests liked it.
    > The general opinion was "too bland", "lacked any flavour" and even "boring". Someone described it
    > as tasting just like tofu! I was mortified!

    > I sliced it very thinly and marinated it for about half an hour in balsamic vinegar and (very
    > good) extra virgin olive oil, seasoned with salt and freshly ground black pepper. I then put a
    > thin slice of roma tomato on a crostini, then the cheese, and topped with a shredded basil leaf.

    Sounds like pearls before swine...

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  17. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 18:32:14 +0000 (UTC),
    [email protected] wrote:

    > In rec.food.cooking, Daisy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > OK - and now thanx everyone for the input.
    >
    > > I presented the boccancini tonight in the recommended fashion - and NONE of my guests liked it.
    > > The general opinion was "too bland", "lacked any flavour" and even "boring". Someone described
    > > it as tasting just like tofu! I was mortified!
    >
    <snip>
    >
    > Sounds like pearls before swine...

    I agree.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  18. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 10:30:40 -0500, Nancy Young
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Daisy wrote:
    > >
    > > OK - and now thanx everyone for the input.
    > >
    > > I presented the boccancini tonight in the recommended fashion - and NONE of my guests liked it.
    > > The general opinion was "too bland", "lacked any flavour" and even "boring". Someone described
    > > it as tasting just like tofu! I was mortified!
    >
    > How very rude!
    >
    It certainly was.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  19. Daisy

    Daisy Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 10:15:40 GMT, "Lawrence Gilburtson"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just my opinion, but fresh mozzarella, while not sharply flavored...should not be bland...if it
    >is made with milk or cream and kept in milk,and made correctly, it will be smooth.it will taste
    >more like a heavenly ricotta than anything else...compared to the sharper cheeses ricotta is
    >pretty bland but it's taste is wonderful for those who like it and in some dishes it can;t be
    >beat.....\ LG
    >

    I am in New Zealand, and there appears to be only one company here making this "buffalo" type of
    fresh mozarella. The company (Kapiti Cheeses) sells widely overseas and has a splendid reputation.
    New Zealand cheesemakers are (reputedly) some of the best in the world - certainly there are many
    cheeses available and of very high quality. You could not fault the local parmesan!

    I like ricotta cheese also. The ricotta here is very nice, but I wouldn't call it a
    "flavourful" cheese. Perhaps flavour is just something that is personal - and flavours do vary
    country to country.

    I use ricotta with other cheeses in a sauce when making crespelli (sp?). It works well. Likewise
    brie and camambert cheeses here are reviewed well by overseas cheese experts. The local havarti and
    soft cream cheeses do well also. Not so good at the smoked however!

    It just may be that the fresh mozarella is not to my taste. I really do like sharp strong cheeses
    like gorgonzola, Stilton and aged tasty cheddar. Some blue vein cheeses here are stronger than
    others. I don't buy the creamy blue for instance - its not strong enough for me.

    Cheers

    Daisy.

    Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.
     
  20. In article <[email protected]_s53>, "Lawrence Gilburtson"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Just my opinion, but fresh mozzarella, while not sharply flavored...should not be bland...if it
    > is made with milk or cream and kept in milk,and made correctly, it will be smooth.it will taste
    > more like a heavenly ricotta than anything else...compared to the sharper cheeses ricotta is
    > pretty bland but it's taste is wonderful for those who like it and in some dishes it can;t be
    > beat.....\ LG

    I just stopped at an Italian deli nearby and picked up a ball of fresh mozzarella, a loaf of their
    bread, and about 1/2 cup of their pizza sauce. Sliced some bread, schmeared some sauce, and topped
    with a slice of the mozz and broiled them for a minute until the cheese softened more. (It didn't
    spread) The mozz had the littlest bit of tang to it -- very nice.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 2-10-04.
     
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