V brake front or rear?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bicyclette, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Bicyclette

    Bicyclette Guest

    I just got an Alivio V brake set front and rear. Is there
    any way to tell which is front and which is rear? They both
    look identical. On the box the only label difference is one
    is "BR-MC18 F 22.0 X 1P 2-8GN0100A-39" and the other is
    almost the same except has "8GN0200A" instead of the
    "8GN0100A" in the second to last position.
     
    Tags:


  2. eddie-<< I just got an Alivio V brake set front and rear. Is
    there any way to tell which is front and which is rear?
    >><BR><BR>

    If the brake blocks are not the slide in type or no
    direction arrows on them, it doesn't matter. if the above is
    so, point the arrows forward or the open ends oin the
    holders aft. The units themselves are identical.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali
    costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. bicyclette wrote:

    > I just got an Alivio V brake set front and rear. Is there
    > any way to tell which is front and which is rear? They
    > both look identical. On the box the only label difference
    > is one is "BR-MC18 F 22.0 X 1P 2-8GN0100A-39" and the
    > other is almost the same except has "8GN0200A" instead of
    > the "8GN0100A" in the second to last position.
    >
    The front one has the noodle which is bent back on itself,
    and the brake pads need to face in the right direction.
    Apart from that I could see no difference between the arms.
     
  4. bicyclette wrote:
    >
    >> I just got an Alivio V brake set front and rear. Is there
    >> any way to tell which is front and which is rear? They
    >> both look identical. On the box the only label difference
    >> is one is "BR-MC18 F 22.0 X 1P 2-8GN0100A-39" and the
    >> other is almost the same except has "8GN0200A" instead of
    >> the "8GN0100A" in the second to last position.

    Zog The Undeniable wrote:

    > The front one has the noodle which is bent back on itself,

    That may be true in markets where right/front brake setup is
    common (typically, countries where they drive on the left)
    but it isn't universal.

    In the U.S. market, the noodles are the same front and rear,
    and the only difference is which way the brake shoes are
    installed.

    They used to come with two noodles, a 90 degree and a 135
    degree one, but that's no longer the case.

    > and the brake pads need to face in the right
    > direction. Apart from that I could see no difference
    > between the arms.

    There is no difference.

    Sheldon "Right Front Yank" Brown +--------------------------------------------------------
    +
    | Several excuses are always less convincing than one. |
    | --Aldous Huxley |
    +--------------------------------------------------------+
    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone 617-244-
    9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find
    parts shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com
    http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  5. Sheldon Brown wrote:

    > That may be true in markets where right/front brake setup
    > is common (typically, countries where they drive on the
    > left) but it isn't universal

    Ah, but do you know why we drive on the left? Have a look at
    this gentleman:

    http://www.speedysigns.com/images/decals/400c/SDEPSL1/MASCO-
    TS/KNIGHT4.gif

    and you can see that he would have to mount his horse on its
    left to avoid his sword getting in the way - swords are
    always worn on the left side of the body for right-handed
    knights because they're easier to draw that way. As you
    don't want to stand in the middle of the road (which is
    probably an open sewer in 14th century England) you have the
    horse on the left side of the road and mount it from the
    verge. Having done this, it makes sense to ride on that side
    of the road too.

    Knights were becoming rare at the time of the American
    Revolution, so we can forgive your mistake - but the French
    have no excuse ;-)
     
Loading...
Loading...