Vaccine-autism study is overblown

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Mark Probert-Fe, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. http://www.medicalposting.ca/children/article.jsp?content=20040217_085151_4976&topStory=y

    Canadian says vaccine-autism study is overblown

    U.S. research linking preservative to brain disorders called wild over-extrapolation

    A Canadian researcher says a highly publicized U.S. study linking a mercury-containing vaccine
    preservative with autism and other brain disorders is no cause for worry.

    "It's probably one of the best examples of wild over-extrapolation in science I've ever seen," says
    Dr. Brian Ward, a vaccine immunologist at McGill University in Montreal. "At the very least they
    should be chided for overactive imaginations."

    In the study, a team led by Richard Deth, professor of pharmacology at Northeastern University in
    Boston, found that thimerosal -- a mercury-containing preservative used in some vaccines -- could
    interrupt biochemical reactions critical for brain development.

    Although the reactions were studied in special cells in a laboratory, the researchers say the
    concentrations of thimerosal were similar to those typically found following vaccination in humans.

    But according to Ward, the study does not show how thimerosal would actually affect cells in the
    body, nor is it clear how much of the preservative would make it into the brain.

    Furthermore, he says, the findings don't agree with population studies that have failed to show a
    link between vaccines and autism, attention deficit disorder and other neurological problems.

    Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization published a comprehensive review of thimerosal
    a year ago. The review points out few vaccines in Canada contain the preservative, and then only in
    trace amounts.

    "The risk that thimerosal or its metabolites may affect the neurologic development of infants is, at
    most, theoretical," the review states.

    "Because the risk of any health effect from thimerosal in vaccines has never been substantiated, and
    because, compared with the real risk of infection from inadvertent contamination of vaccine, the
    risk of thimerosal-related health effects is negligible. Vaccines containing thimerosal should not
    be withheld if they are needed."

    Still, the committee encouraged vaccine makers to develop alternatives to it.

    Thimerosal has been used to a much greater extent in vaccines made in the U.S., where it is also
    being phased out. In Canada, the preservative is used in vaccines that are distributed in multidose
    vials, such as influenza and hepatitis B.

    "This doesn't mean that the push to get thimerosal out of vaccines is an expression of communal
    guilt," says Ward, who is an associate professor of medicine and microbiology at McGill University
    and the Montreal General Hospital Research Institute.
     
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  2. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Vaccine-autism study is overblown
    >From: "Mark Probert-February 17, 2004" [email protected]
    >Date: 2/18/2004 6:09 AM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    >http://www.medicalposting.ca/children/article.jsp?content=20040217_085151
    _4976&topStory=y
    >
    >Canadian says vaccine-autism study is overblown
    >
    >U.S. research linking preservative to brain disorders called wild over-extrapolation
    >
    >A Canadian researcher says a highly publicized U.S. study linking a mercury-containing vaccine
    >preservative with autism and other brain disorders is no cause for worry.

    This Canadian researcher wouldn't be a member of *organized medicine* would he??

    Sounda a great deal like mercury is ONLY safe *IN* the mouth.

    <snip>

    >But according to Ward, the study does not show how thimerosal would actually affect cells in the
    >body, nor is it clear how much of the preservative would make it into the brain.

    Ummm. But don't worry.

    <snip>

    >
    >"The risk that thimerosal or its metabolites may affect the neurologic development of infants is,
    >at most, theoretical," the review states.

    That's an *opinion*

    <snip>

    >"This doesn't mean that the push to get thimerosal out of vaccines is an expression of
    >communal guilt,"

    Riiiiiiiiighto!!

    Don't ever ever ever admit we erred.

    Jan
     
  3. "Jan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Subject: Vaccine-autism study is overblown From: "Mark Probert-February 17, 2004"
    [email protected]
    > >Date: 2/18/2004 6:09 AM Pacific Standard Time Message-id:
    > ><[email protected]>
    > >
    > >
    > >http://www.medicalposting.ca/children/article.jsp?content=20040217_085151
    > _4976&topStory=y
    > >
    > >Canadian says vaccine-autism study is overblown
    > >
    > >U.S. research linking preservative to brain disorders called wild over-extrapolation
    > >
    > >A Canadian researcher says a highly publicized U.S. study linking a mercury-containing vaccine
    > >preservative with autism and other brain disorders is no cause for worry.
    >
    > This Canadian researcher wouldn't be a member of *organized medicine*
    would
    > he??

    He is a scientist not a salesman, if that is what you mean....
     
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