"vacuum" flasks

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Brian, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Brian

    Brian Guest

    I don't suppose any of you guys could recommend a decent brand of "vacuum" flask?

    My 5 month old "Aztec" 1 litre stainless steel flask is now no longer keeping things hot - when I
    pour in a hot drink, the outside wall of the flask gets hot a half hour later :-(

    Doesn't seem right to me... I did get a replacement stopper free of charge from the manufacturer as
    the rubber o-ring had perished, but even with the new stopper the outer wall is still getting hot.

    --
    Brian
     
    Tags:


  2. "Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > I don't suppose any of you guys could recommend a decent brand of "vacuum" flask?
    >
    > My 5 month old "Aztec" 1 litre stainless steel flask is now no longer keeping things hot - when I
    > pour in a hot drink, the outside wall of the flask gets hot a half hour later :-(
    >
    > Doesn't seem right to me... I did get a replacement stopper free of charge from the
    > manufacturer as the rubber o-ring had perished, but even with the new stopper the outer wall is
    > still getting hot.
    >
    > --
    > Brian
    It is broken. Take it back to the shop and get your money back. Graham
     
  3. Brian

    Brian Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:03:10 +0000, Graham Bowers wrote:

    >>
    >> Doesn't seem right to me... I did get a replacement stopper free of charge from the
    >> manufacturer as the rubber o-ring had perished, but even with the new stopper the outer wall is
    >> still getting hot.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Brian
    > It is broken. Take it back to the shop and get your money back. Graham

    I might get in touch with the makers of the flask, and see if they will exchange for a new one,
    after all it's supposed to have a 10 year warranty. (They did replace the stopper free of charge, so
    hopefully they should replace the flask as it's faulty)

    --
    Brian
     
  4. Druidh

    Druidh Guest

    "Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:03:10 +0000, Graham Bowers wrote:
    >
    >
    > >>
    > >> Doesn't seem right to me... I did get a replacement stopper free of charge from the
    > >> manufacturer as the rubber o-ring had perished, but
    even
    > >> with the new stopper the outer wall is still getting hot.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Brian
    > > It is broken. Take it back to the shop and get your money back. Graham
    >
    > I might get in touch with the makers of the flask, and see if they will exchange for a new one,
    > after all it's supposed to have a 10 year warranty. (They did replace the stopper free of charge,
    > so hopefully they should replace the flask as it's faulty)
    >
    > --
    > Brian
    >
    I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know all
    about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.

    druidh
     
  5. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, druidh wrote:

    >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    >all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.

    I rather like tea without glass shards in it. The stainless steel unbreakable flasks might not be as
    efficient as the silvered glass ones but they don't break if you or your sac take a tumble. Now
    leaving a thermos in the car to drink after a walk is a mighty good idea, especially if you are
    parked miles from anywhere.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    In article <BbN%[email protected]>, druidh
    <[email protected]> writes
    >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    >all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >

    One of the mags did a review of a whole bunch of stainless flasks and at least one
    traditional glass.

    IIRC the best stainless were as good as the glass. The worst stainless were very poor.

    --

    http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/
     
  7. On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, "druidh"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    >all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >

    Gadgetry? Making a flask out of something that doesn't break if you drop it? Hardly. Metal flasks
    keep the liquid hot all day - what more do you want?
     
  8. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    druidh <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    >all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >
    I am convinced they are very poor compared with one I must have had for over 20 years! I just looked
    and it is a genuine Thermos - made in England.

    The SS one was a present from my daughter a few years ago, hasn't been used much, barely keeps
    it warm for a day's walk, and even with the stopper screwed hard in if I shake the flask it
    leaks, probably via the patent pourer, which enables you to pour with the stopper unscrewed part
    way. Useless!
    --
    Gordon
     
  9. Druidh

    Druidh Guest

    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <BbN%[email protected]>, druidh
    > <[email protected]> writes
    > >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents
    hot
    > >as well as old fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me.
    > >(Yes - I know all about priming, insulating etc
    etc
    > >etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    > >
    >
    > One of the mags did a review of a whole bunch of stainless flasks and at least one
    > traditional glass.
    >
    > IIRC the best stainless were as good as the glass. The worst stainless were very poor.
    >
    > --
    >

    > http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/

    Any chance of laocting the article? Very interested to see what was as good as glass.

    druidh
     
  10. Druidh

    Druidh Guest

    "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, druidh wrote:
    >
    > >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents
    hot
    > >as well as old fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me.
    > >(Yes - I know all about priming, insulating etc
    etc
    > >etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >
    > I rather like tea without glass shards in it. The stainless steel unbreakable flasks might not be
    > as efficient as the silvered glass ones but they don't break if you or your sac take a tumble. Now
    > leaving a thermos in the car to drink after a walk is a mighty good idea, especially if you are
    > parked miles from anywhere.
    > --
    > Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"

    Not being in the habit if falling over (touch wood), I've never actually broken a glass flask. I'd
    imagine one would have to be particularly unlucky to fall in just such a manner as to produce such a
    shock (and I'd be more worried about my camera). But I could be convinced if I could find a
    stainless one which worked.

    druidh
     
  11. Druidh

    Druidh Guest

    "Simon Caldwell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, "druidh" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >>
    > >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents
    hot
    > >as well as old fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me.
    > >(Yes - I know all about priming, insulating etc
    etc
    > >etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    > >
    >
    > Gadgetry? Making a flask out of something that doesn't break if you drop it? Hardly. Metal flasks
    > keep the liquid hot all day - what more do you want?
    >

    Well - I'd like a flask that actually DID keep the liquid hot all day. No matter whose SS flask
    I've compared against, and whatever preparatory methods are used, my drinks are always hotter.
    Admittedly this is more of an issue in the depths of winter, but then I never have a hot drink in
    summer anyway.

    and how many times have you dropped a flask?

    druidh
     
  12. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    druidh <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >"Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, druidh wrote:
    >>
    >> >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents
    >hot
    >> >as well as old fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for
    >> >me. (Yes - I know all about priming, insulating etc
    >etc
    >> >etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >>
    >> I rather like tea without glass shards in it. The stainless steel unbreakable flasks might not be
    >> as efficient as the silvered glass ones but they don't break if you or your sac take a tumble.
    >> Now leaving a thermos in the car to drink after a walk is a mighty good idea, especially if you
    >> are parked miles from anywhere.
    >> --
    >> Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
    >
    >Not being in the habit if falling over (touch wood), I've never actually broken a glass flask. I'd
    >imagine one would have to be particularly unlucky to fall in just such a manner as to produce such
    >a shock (and I'd be more worried about my camera). But I could be convinced if I could find a
    >stainless one which worked.
    >
    I broke one in 30 years walking. On a cobbled slippery path my legs shot from under me and I sat
    down painfully. The flask was at the bottom of the sack and took the same blow.

    Since then I have always had some kind of padding under the flask, when I carry one.
    --
    Gordon
     
  13. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    druidh <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >

    >> IIRC the best stainless were as good as the glass. The worst stainless were very poor.
    >>

    >> http://www.dscs.demon.co.uk/
    >
    >Any chance of laocting the article? Very interested to see what was as good as glass.
    >
    ...and how much it costs. ;-)
    --
    Gordon
     
  14. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, "druidh" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >>
    > >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    > >fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    > >all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    > >
    >
    > Gadgetry? Making a flask out of something that doesn't break if you drop it? Hardly. Metal flasks
    > keep the liquid hot all day - what more do you want?
    >
    >
    Quite. I've never had any problems with mine. I've got two stainless steel flasks, and they're both
    brilliant. Much better than the lottery with the glass getting in the water.
    --
    Fran If you need my email address please ask.
     
  15. Chris Street

    Chris Street Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:49:53 GMT, "druidh" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >
    >"Brian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]...
    >> On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 19:03:10 +0000, Graham Bowers wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> >>
    >> >> Doesn't seem right to me... I did get a replacement stopper free of charge from the
    >> >> manufacturer as the rubber o-ring had perished, but
    >even
    >> >> with the new stopper the outer wall is still getting hot.
    >> >>
    >> >> --
    >> >> Brian
    >> > It is broken. Take it back to the shop and get your money back. Graham
    >>
    >> I might get in touch with the makers of the flask, and see if they will exchange for a new one,
    >> after all it's supposed to have a 10 year warranty. (They did replace the stopper free of charge,
    >> so hopefully they should replace the flask as it's faulty)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Brian
    >>
    >I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >fashioned "Thermos" flasks.

    Stainless flasks came first by the way. Then some bright spark in Scotland called Dewar invented a
    glass strong enough to hold a vacuum without shattering....

    > Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know all about priming, insulating
    > etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >
    >
    >druidh
    >

    --
    79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
    looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
     
  16. Chris Street

    Chris Street Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 23:58:22 +0000, Gordon <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >druidh <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>I remain to be convinced that stainless steel flasks keep their contents hot as well as old
    >>fashioned "Thermos" flasks. Tried it, but back to the old fashioned method for me. (Yes - I know
    >>all about priming, insulating etc etc etc). Another triumph of gadgetry over function.
    >>
    >I am convinced they are very poor compared with one I must have had for over 20 years! I just
    >looked and it is a genuine Thermos - made in England.
    >
    >The SS one was a present from my daughter a few years ago, hasn't been used much, barely keeps
    >it warm for a day's walk, and even with the stopper screwed hard in if I shake the flask it
    >leaks, probably via the patent pourer, which enables you to pour with the stopper unscrewed part
    >way. Useless!

    Aladdin do some of the best stainless flasks. My 1 litre one is outperformed by a 1 litre Thermos by
    about 2C in the first four hours which isn't that bad.

    My smaller noname stainless 0.5 litre fares worse although that's probably due to it being smaller -
    6C in four hours (below the Thermos)

    I once took the inner of a three litre Thermos and stuck a base plate and the innards of a
    Mullard 360 tetrode inside - took my father ages to realise that it wasn't actually some form of
    exotic RF tube!

    --
    79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
    looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
     
  17. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 20:09:25 +0000, Phil Cook
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Now leaving a thermos in the car to drink after a walk is a mighty good idea, especially if you
    > are parked miles from anywhere.

    Better still is a stove and kettle and tea and coffee and... various other goodies waiting for
    you when you get back. Takes 5 mins to brew up, and it's much nicer than tea that's been in a
    flask all day.

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  18. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <i6R%[email protected]>
    from "druidh" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Not being in the habit if falling over (touch wood), I've never actually broken a glass flask.
    > I'd imagine one would have to be particularly unlucky to fall in just such a manner as to produce
    > such a shock

    I have broken a flask (the same one) twice and in neither case was it as the result of falling or
    dropping. The first time was on a Scottish summit one Easter back in the 70s when I put my rucksack
    down on what I thought was soft snow. Since then I haven't carried a Thermos on the hill. The second
    only a winter or 2 ago when one of the several bags I was carrying gave the stone jamb of the garage
    doorway a glancing blow. This time the flask went straight into the bin. Sheer carelessness in both
    cases but in neither was much force required, just an unfortunate proximity between a slow moving
    flask and hard stone.

    --

    Roger
     
  19. >Well - I'd like a flask that actually DID keep the liquid hot all day. No matter whose SS flask
    >I've compared against, and whatever preparatory methods are used, my drinks are always hotter.
    >Admittedly this is more of an issue in the depths of winter, but then I never have a hot drink in
    >summer anyway.

    Mine's an Aladdin Atlas and I'd recommend it to anyone.

    >and how many times have you dropped a flask?
    >

    Not sure, but judging by the number of dents, quite a few!
     
  20. Leonard Trim

    Leonard Trim Guest

    Interested in this thread. I have a SS flask but it leaks. It is one of those ones where you press
    in a button then pour. Useless. Can anyone suggest a 0.75 litre SS flask which does not leak,
    preferably one with no fancy press button/pour type thingies. I do not use a thermos, because I have
    broken a couple, mind you that was in my mountaineering rather than walking days.

    --
    Len Trim [email protected]
     
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